HSHS Baby Book

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This book is created to help answer some of the questions you may have before and after you meet your little one. Partner with your doctor at your HSHS hospital to help you prepare to be the best parent for your baby!

hat’s Insid

Pregnacy

Mom and Baby: month by month

Life with Baby

Baby: 0-12 months

Toddler: 12 months-2 years

HSHS Hospital Facilities for You and Baby

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First and foremost. . . You’re going to experience changes. Having a baby creates emotional, physical, mental, and environmental changes for you and all those who help you with your baby. Your body is going to be your bab’y home for nine months, so it will change to accomodate him or her. You’re going to be tired and cranky sometimes. You’re going to be scared and stressed at times. And all of it is natural and normal when having a baby. You might have to give up some things for the sake of your baby’s health. There are a few things that your baby cannot handle while in the womb. Here’s some things to protect your baby from, as well as the potential birth defects that come with them. i t and foremost. . . You’re going to experience changes. Having a baby creates emotional, physical, mental, and environmental changes for you and all those who help you with your baby. Your body is going to be your baby’s home for nine months, so it will change to accomodate him or her. You’re going to be tired and cranky sometimes. You’re going to be scared and stressed at times. But, just remember that it’s all natural and normal. You might have to give up some things for the sake of your baby’s health. Smoking & Second-hand Smoke Alcohol Inherited Disorders or Birth Defects Can Cause: Brain damage,

Smoking & Second-hand Smoke Can cause: Premature or low birth weight What to do: Can Cause: Premature or low birth weight What to do: Stop smoking, and stay away from smoke Stop smoking, and stay away from smoke Contagious Diseases Can cause: Contagious Diseases Can Cause: Birth defects What to do: Get immunized before pregnancy; Ask your doctor which shots you need to update Birth defects What to do: Get immunized before you are pregnant. Ask your doctor which shots you nee to update

Alcohol Can cause:

Drugs Can cause: Birth defects, fetal stokes, miscarriages What to do: Don’t do drugs, get help

Inherited Disorders or Birth Defects Can cause: Varied Problems What to do: If you think you baby might be at risk for something, ask about screening tests Drugs heart defects, and ev n miscarriag s What to do: Don’t drink while pregnant, get help if you struggle with drinking Can Cause: Birth defects, fetal st k s, miscarriages What to do: Don’t do drugs, get help

Can Cause: Varied problems What to do: If you think baby might be at risk for something, ask about screening tests

Brain damage, heart defects, and even

miscarriages What to do: Don’t drink while pregnant, get help with problem drinking

COULD I BE PREGNANT? Gaining Weight?

more tired than usual?

HUNGIER?

Moodier?

Sick to your stomach?

having strange cravings?

Breasts Seem To Be Outgrowing Your Bras?

HAVE YOU MISSED A PERIOD OR ONLY HAD LIGHT SPOTTING?

You may be pregnant! See your doctor or clinic

for a pregnancy test as soon as you can.

Now, here’s what you need to know

If I’m feeling okay, do I have to go to visit the doctor? It is important to you and your baby that you receive prenatal care. Your doctor is the only one able to help you during this time and ensure that you and baby are as healthy as can be.

What type of things will the doctor need to know? Things like...

When was your last menstrual period? You and your family’s medical history

A physical exam will take place including a pap smear, pelvic exam, and other tests Blood and urine tests will also be administered to test for certain risks in the pregnancy Measurements of weight, height, and blood pressure When your next appointment will be. You will need to come back at least once a month for 6 months, and then more often once delivery is nearing.

Choosing Your Care Plan

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Momma’s Healthy Body for Baby

Exercise (but not too much)

Gain Weight (but not too much)

1. Determine an appropriate amount and form of exercise for during your pregnancy

1. Discuss with your doctor how much weight you should gain in your pregnancy

2. Exercising regularly is better for your baby

2. 25 to 35 pounds is average for pregnancy

3. Once the first trimester is over, avoid exercises on your back, because it decreases blood flow to your baby 4. Body changes in regards to shape and size can also affect your balance

3. Your baby is only a small part of the weight gain... 7-8 lbs for baby 2-4 lbs for placenta and amniotic fluids 2-2.5 lbs for uterus 8.5-12 lbs for increased blood and fluids 5.5-8.5 lbs for breast and fat stores

Protect You and the Baby

Dental Hygiene

1. You may be asked to limit or avoid sexual activity if there are risks including miscarriage, premature birth, breaking the amniotic sac, and more

1. Inform your dentist of your pregnancy

2. Pregnancy hormones increase your risk of gum disease, so make sure you’re flossing 3. Brushing at least twice a day with fluoride toothpaste will also help fight cavities and gum disease

2. Sex is okay as long as you are comfortable, and you are protecting yourself and your baby from sexually transmitted diseases

The greatest gift you’ll give your baby is a strong, healthy body and mind.

Lactose-intolerent? Get the calcium you need through: broccoli, greens, bok choy,

canned salmon (with bones), low-fat tofu made with calcium, and lactose-reduced milk

Folic Acid & other Vitamins and Minerals Why? Protect baby from birth defects and help baby develop How?

Less of the “Bad Stu” Want Soda? Try 100% fruit juice Sweets? What about Donuts? Substitute yogurt or a peanut butter and jelly sandwich Sweet fruits like apples, bananas, and oranges Fries? Baked potatoes will satisfy your salty craving Craving Something Fried? Try the grilled version

Fruits & Veggies Why? More fruits and vegetables means more nutrition for you and baby, and they have less fat How? Reference the food plate to make sure you’re getting healthy servings for each meal

Lots of dark, leafy vegetables, beans,

asparagus, orange juice, whole grains, and cereals; also try out vitamin and mineral pills to make sure you get all you need **Vitamins will not make you gain weight, feel hungry, or take the place of a balanced diet**

Make Sure You Eat Right

Don’t Worry

Nausea

Heartburn

The burning sensation near your heart area can sometimes be a problem during the last months of pregnancy. Eating five or six small meals a day instead of two or three larger ones may aid this pain, as well as avoiding fatty, fried, and spicy food. You may also attempt to wear clothes that are looser around the waist and simply just relax.

Nausea, also known as “morning sickness,” is common during the early months of pregnancy. It may stop around the third month, but could occur at anytime. Try eating small meals during the day, drinking between your meals rather than with them, and avoiding greasy food to aid in the nausea. Also, consult with your doctor about which medicines you can take for nausea during your pregnancy.

When to Contact Your Doctor

Constipation

- If you want to take any type of unprescribed medication for these symptoms - Experience burning or painful urination - Sudden weight gain - Swelling in hands and face - Decreased fetal movements - Fever or chills - Severe headaches, dizziness, blurred vision or spots before your eyes

During pregnancy, hormones and pressure from growth in your uterus can make bowel movement more dicult.

Make sure your diet includes fruits, vegetables, whole grain breads and cereals, and lots of liquids. Exercise may help elimination as well.

If you experience:

If you are being physically abused, please call for help. Abuse is a serious matter, and no one deserves to suer from it. Being abused while pregnant creates serious health risks for both you and the baby. Crisis centers, shelters, transportation to safety, legal rights, and group counseling are all readily available for you if you need help.

1. Sharp and/or constant pains in your stomach or vaginal area

2. Vaginal Bleeding

3. Watery or pink-colored vaginal discharge Call your doctor immediately, because you may be

experiencing a miscarriage.

Mom and Baby:

month by month

MOM... Changing Body: May find that your breasts are becoming more tender and full Your areola (or the area around your nipples) has begun darkening Your vaginal discharge has become thicker, whiter, and stickier

BABY... About 1 inch in height and 1 ounce in weight

Heart beats

Forming a stomach, brain, and lungs

Has fingers and toes

May experience being emotional or moody You may visit the bathroom more frequently

Beginning to have eyelids and other facial features

At Your Prenatal Visit: Your nurse or doctor will weigh you, measure your blood pressure, check your urine, and measure your uterus.

Questions to ask the doctor:

Mom’s Checklist:

What were my test results?

mood swings

What can I do about my morning sickness?

drinking lots of water

Why am I so tired all the time?

eating a variety of healthy foods

staying away from drugs, caeine, smoking, and alcohol

MOM... Changing Body: You may feel tired more often Nausea and vomiting could still occur, but less frequent and shorter time spans You might have around 3-4 pounds weight gain Your breasts are still increasing in size You may find yourself dizzy or with a headache Increased vaginal discharge is normal At Your Prenatal Visit: Your nurse or doctor will weigh you, measure your blood pressure, check your urine, measure your uterus, and allow you to hear your baby’s heartbeat.

BABY... About 3-4 inches in height and a little more than 1 ounce in weight

Starting to move and suck his/her thumb

Baby’s arms, hands, fingers, legs, feet, and toes are now fully formed

You may see hair beginning to grow on head

Kidneys fully function and send urine to the bladder

Mom’s Checklist:

Questions to ask the doctor:

What am I allowed to do to treat my headaches?

keeping weight gain slow and steady

What should I do if healthy food is making me sick?

hormones are making mom happy at one moment, and sad the next

taking vitamins

MOM... Changing Body: Mom may find herself hungier and craving certain foods You may find yourself getting hot more often throughout the rest of your pregnancy Heartburn and intestinal gas is normal You might have around 6-8 pounds weight gain At Your Prenatal Visit: Your nurse or doctor will weigh you, measure your blood pressure, check your urine, measure your uterus, and allow you to hear your baby’s heartbeat.

BABY... About 6-8 inches in height and 6 ounces in weight

All organs are now fully developed

Baby is becoming more active

You may be able to hear baby’s heartbeat

Mom’s Checklist:

Questions to ask the doctor:

What’s this fluttering feeling I have in my stomach more recently?

Baby is moving

Am I still allowed to have sex?

Having baby now feels more “real”

Mom “looks” pregnant

MOM... Changing Body: Breasts may become more veiny as breasts grow and prepare for breastfeeding You might have around 9-12 pounds weight gain Constipation is normal during this time Fluttering feeling is more apparent as baby moves around At Your Prenatal Visit: Your nurse or doctor will weigh you, measure your blood pressure, check your urine, measure your uterus, and allow you to hear your baby’s heartbeat.

BABY... About 8-12 inches in height and 0.5-1 pound in weight

Muscles are being developed and baby moves regularly

Creating patterns of sleep and activity

Mom’s Checklist:

Questions to ask the doctor:

Is there anything that will help with my constipation?

Baby name ideas are starting to be discussed

Am I still allowed to exercise normally?

Ask friends and family for help once baby arrives

Starting to view and arrange options for child care (even if mom is not returning to work)

MOM... Changing Body:

BABY...

You might have around 12-16 pound weight gain Colostrum (thick yellow fluid) may start to leak from your breasts Increased heartburn may result from spicy or rich foods Morning sickness will likely be gone You will probably not have the intense urge to urinate anymore You will start to really feel your baby’s movement At Your Prenatal Visit: Your nurse or doctor will weigh you, measure your blood pressure, check your urine, measure your uterus, and allow you to hear your baby’s heartbeat.

About 12-14 inches in height and 0.5-2 pounds in weight

Able to hear, swallow, hiccup, move about, turn, and open and close his/her eyes

Patterns for activity, rest, sleep, and movement are also more developed now

You may also have your blood checked to see if you are anemic during this month

Questions to ask the doctor:

Mom’s Checklist:

When is it best to start looking for a doctor for the baby?

Milder or fewer mood swings

Could I have some information about breastfeeding? Is it really best for the baby?

Becoming tired of being pregnant

Learning about what happens during labor to feel better prepared

MOM... Changing Body: You might have around 15-20 pound weight gain You may develop hemorrhoids Begin to feel even more baby movement At Your Prenatal Visit: Your nurse or doctor will weigh you, measure your blood pressure, check your urine, measure your uterus, and allow you to hear your baby’s heartbeat.

BABY...

About 15-16 inches in height and 3 pounds in weight

Bones are becoming stronger and harder

Kicks, moves arms, stretches, and wiggles very often

Gums have started forming tooth structures

You may be asked to start visiting the oce more frequently at this point.

Can hear music and Mom’s voice

Special Concerns: Check in with your doctor if you start experiencing excessive swelling and/or headaches, or decreased baby movements.

Questions to ask the doctor:

Doctor’s Checklist:

When should I sign up for birthing classes?

These are some things you may want to consider when choosing your baby’s pediatrician.

If my baby was born today, what would be the risks?

Clinic or oce hours

I often worry about what could happen to my baby? Is this normal?

Location services provided

Billing and payment expectations

Telephone times for minor issues

How to deal with after-hour emergencies

MOM... Changing Body:

BABY...

You might have around 18-24 pound weight gain It may be dicult to sit, stand, or lie down for long periods time Back pain and discomfort is normal as well Stretch marks on your stomach and hips may develop At Your Prenatal Visit: Your nurse or doctor will weigh you, measure your blood pressure, check your urine, measure your uterus, and allow you to hear your baby’s heartbeat. You may have to have an internal (pelvic) examination to determine if your body is almost ready for delivery. Special Concerns: Check in with your doctor if you start experiencing excessive swelling and/or headaches, or decreased baby movements.

About 18 inches in height and 4-6 pounds in weight

Kicks have become strong

Head bones are soft and movable

Hiccuping, urinating, swallowing, and sucking of fingers are all normal for this time

Can hear music and Mom’s voice

Questions to ask the doctor:

How will I know when I am in labor?

Baby’s Checklist:

What are my choices to relieve pain during childbirth?

These are some things you may want to consider having around once baby is born:

feeding supplies diapers baby skin care items

bassinet or cradle crib baby bed sheets sleepers or gowns t-shirts

What should I do when labor starts?

What should I pack for the hospital?

thermometer infant car seat

blankets

socks or booties

MOM... Changing Body: You might have around 25-35 pound weight gain You may feel tired more often Headaches and constipation are common Breasts increase in size and in fluid leakage Leg cramps and backaches are also common May become grumpy and uncomfortable May feel that baby is now sitting lower and has “dropped” further down At Your Prenatal Visit: Your nurse or doctor will weigh you, measure your blood pressure, check your urine, measure your uterus, and allow you to hear your baby’s heartbeat. You may be asked to start visiting the oce once a week at this point. Special Concerns: Check in with your doctor if you start experiencing excessive swelling and/or headaches, or decreased baby movements.

BABY...

About 19-20 inches in height and 6.5-8 pounds in weight

Baby shifts to birthing position, which is head down

Moves and kicks, but lacks room

Questions to ask the doctor:

I want to breastfeed. When should I tell the hosptial sta?

I can’t get comfortable. How can I get some rest?

Can I get some information on circumcision if it’s a boy?

Mom’s Checklist:

When am I allowed to have sex again after the baby is born?

Ask the baby’s father or close family member or friend to be with you in the delivery room

What birth control methods are safest when breastfeeding?

Prepare a hospital bag for when the baby comes. Include a change of clothes, daily items (toothbrush), clothes for the baby, etc.

your baby Name: ___________________ Birth date: ________________ Time of birth: _____________ Weight: __________________ Length: __________________

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What to Expect When You’re DONE Expecting Congratulations! You have a beautiful baby to love and nuture, bathe and feed, and watch grow up right before your eyes! You’re going to go through a lot trial and error, especially with your first born, but just know that making mistakes is normal. The more you get to know your baby, the better you’re going to be able to take care of him or her. Some things to consider: Visitors and quiet time... People are going to want to meet your bundle of joy, but frequent visitors can make both baby and mom very tired. Visitors should come to help you out with your new baby, or if baby gets too tired, lay him or her down in a quiet place to nap or kindly ask your guests to come back another time. If visitors are sick, politely ask them to come by when they are feeling better to protect the health of your baby. Also, if there are any smokers present, request that they refrain from doing it near your baby. Feeding... You may choose breastfeeding, which can help mom lose weight, can help you bond with your baby, and it’s the best way to feed your baby (protects against infections and great nutrition). If breastfeeding is not an option for you, consult with your nurse or doctor which formula will be best for your baby. Some things to give extra care: Testing... Some diseases have no symptoms, so Illinois law states that all newborns should be tested for inherited and metabolic disorders. If these problems can be found early on, he or she can be treated earlier. Cord Care... It is important that the cord stays clean and dry. You can keep it clean by dipping a cotton swab in alcohol and wiping it around the cord two to three times a day. If you can, keep the diaper turned down from the cord. The cord should fall o in about a week, so do not attempt to pull it o yourself. If there is anything abnormal about the cord (odors, colored discharge, redness, or swelling), notify your doctor. Circumcision... Putting a little petroleum jelly on the penis every time you change him will help heal the circumcision. The cut should be healed between a week to ten days. If you chose not to cicumcise, pull back the foreskin and clean, but do not force it back. At four months old, the foreskin will be easy to pull back and clean. Discuss with your physician if it is not.

“How’s Mom Doing?” Having a baby may not be as easy everyone makes it out to be. These are real feelings and concerns mothers have postpartum.

“Why does my body still look pregnant?” Some people find that it takes nine months to get ready for baby and nine months more to get back to your before baby body. At delivery, you’ll lose about 12 pounds and then up to 5 pounds of fluids over the next few days. You may find your belly still looking large, because it takes a few weeks for your uterus to shrink back down to size. Your doctor can recommend foods and exercises to help you lose the rest of the weight. After you lose the weight, your hips may still be wider and your breasts softer and less firm. You may enjoy your new body more, because you know that it brought your beautiful little one into this world!

“Am I okay physically?” You’re going to be sore after delivery, and probably experience some pain or discomfort while walking or sitting (especially if you had a tear, episiotomy, or stiches). Going to the bathroom will be a bit uncomfortable as well the first few days (let your doctor know if you cannot urinate). Vaginal discharge or bleeding may occur for a few weeks as well. Your breasts may also be sore and tender. How to help: 1. Hot compress or warm plain bath 2. Pain relievers (recom- mended by your doctor) 3. Healthy foods to help keep energy up 4. Drink lots of liquids 5. Lots of rest (sleep when baby sleeps if you can)

“I’ve been really sad since delivery.” Your new baby brings a lot of love and happiness into your home, but he or she also brings sleepless nights and grumpy moods within your little family. You’re going to feel tired, overwhelmed, inadequate, and maybe depressed. These “baby blues” will probably only last a short while after delivery. How to help: 1. Know that this happens to most moms 2. Make sure you’re taking care of yourself 3. Exercise (after you are healed) 4. Ask dad, friends, and family members to help you out. It takes a village. 5. If your mood doesn’t improve in a couple of weeks, or you can no longer take care of yourself and baby, get help as soon as you can

“Why does my baby’s dad act like he just had a baby?” It’s normal for your baby’s dad to feel “baby blues” as well. You can help dad get through this by including him in taking care of baby (this will help you out a lot too) and doing things together as a family. He’s new at this parent job too, and wants the support and encouragement just as much as you do.

“When am I allowed to have sex again?” Usually in about 4-6 weeks, your body is

healed enough to continue in sexual

activity. As long as you are comfortable and feel ready. Make sure you consult with your doctor and partner beforehand, so there are mutual understandings when you are ready again. It is possible for mom to become pregnant again before your next period. Because of this, talk to your doctor about family planning methods.

Always consider you and your baby’s health, and never hesitate to ask your doctor when you have questions.

-12 months

Loving on Baby

Taking care of your little one can be so much fun, but there’s a few things you may need to know before you get the hang of your baby’s needs.

Babies need to be bathed every two to three days. Their skin may get to be too dry if you give them a bath everyday. His or her hair should be washed twice a week with mild soap or shampoo. When changing your baby, clean the diaper area with warm water. Wet diapers can bother a baby’s delicate skin, so try to change him or her as often as poosible. If your baby has diaper rash, try using a zinc oxide ointment after washing him or her. Contact your doctor if the rash doesn’t clear after a few days. If you use cornstarch or powder, be sure to sprinkle it on your hand away from baby before applying (don’t let baby breathe it in). Make sure you clean your hands after changing. Your baby will have about 6 wet diaper changes every 24 hours and a few bowel movements.

Bathing:

Skin Care:

Let your baby sleep on their back, not side or stomach. Newborns need to sleep about 12 to 20 hours a day, but may only sleep two to four hours at a time.

Sleep:

Babies cry for lots of reasons. They cry when they are in pain, hungry, uncomfortable, tired, bored, and tense. If your baby is not hungry or needing a diaper change, try taking him or her for a walk, car ride, or oer a pacifier. Newborns may cry anywhere from two to three hours a day. But infants may only cry for 10 to 15 minutes before falling asleep. Sometimes your baby just cries and there’s nothing you can do. Consult with your doctor if you are struggling.

Crying:

eating good 0-4 months 4 months 6 months 9 months 12 months Breast milk or doctor recommended iron-fortified formula will Once your child can hold his or her head up, sit supported, and Try to accustom baby to drinking milk out of a cup

After your baby is familiar with cereal, attempt to adapt them with vegetables, then fruit. Fruit desserts are not recommended. Breast milk and formula are still important to the baby’s diet, and should be part of it until baby’s first birthday. Stick with a certain food when introducing them to it for a few days. Stay away from mixed vegetables. These tips will help you catch if baby has an allergic reaction to any foods.

Baby should now be able to drink whole milk from a cup. By now, your baby will want to eat the same foods your family is eating, so oer bite size pieces that they can feed themself with. They are not quite ready for hard foods like nuts, popcorn, hot dogs, raw vegetables, or other foods that could choke them.

be all your baby needs for the first 4-6 months. Contact your doctor if you have any complications with breastfeeding your baby. Try avoiding bottles or pacifiers the first 2-4 weeks to really establish your milk supply. The dierent nipples might confuse him or her otherwise. Feed baby at least 8-12 times a day. After 2-4 weeks, you can pump your breast milk and give it to your baby through a bottle. If you are not breastfeeding, be sure your formula is iron-fortified, and you are not adding more water to the formula than called for.

turn his or her head away when full, they are most likely ready to try eating cereal. Start them o with dry, boxed infant rice cereal and a small amount of breast milk or formula. Don’t attempt to mix rice cereal with other cereals, like oatmeal. The cereal should be spoon fed only.

instead of a bottle. Baby should also be sitting in a high chair at this age and be learning to feed himself or herself. Child-sized feeding spoons will be best in learning this skill. Start serving food strained or chopped and without salt, pepper or seasoning. You can use a blender, food mill, or fork to mash table foods.

Making sure your baby gets the right foods in their diet let’s them get a healthy start in life!

Oh, Oh Oral Care Too much bottle is not good Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, or BBTD, is caused from over exposure of liquids to the teeth. It results in tooth decay and early loss of teeth. How to prevent BBTD Have your baby drink from a bottle at feeding time, but not bedtime. If your baby must have a bottle to go to bed, give them water and not milk. Only allow baby to suck on a bottle when he or she is hungry. A pacifier is helpful if he or she wants more sucking time. Facts about fluoride Fluoride in water helps prevent tooth decay. If your water does not contain fluoride and you only breastfeed, ask your doctor if iron drops with fluoride is an option.

Month by month oral care 0-4: Gums should be wiped with a clean, damp cloth after each feeding regarless of breastfeeding or bottlefeeding. Sucking is a natural reflex for babies. If you find that your baby needs a pacifier, purchase some approved by the American Dental Association. 6-9: Baby’s teeth will begin to poke through. This may make baby fussy or irritable during teething. To help baby during this time, rub your fingers on his or her gums or allow have him or her chew on a clean teething ring. Cold, wet washcloths also help with teething. Wrap gauze around your finger and gently rub the teeth to clean them after each feeding and bath time. When the time is right, show him or her how to use a toothbrush or wash cloth.

9: Baby’s teeth should be all the same color. If you find any spots or stains on his or her teeth, take them to a dentist.

12: By now, your one year old should be able to brush their own teeth with a soft toothbrush after each meal, but an adult should always help.

Safe and Sound

6-9 months: If your baby is intrigued by something that is not safe, move it out of reach from your baby. Be very aware of your baby when they are close to or in water. Your baby is still not allowed to grasp small objects. They will feel drawn to put them in their mouth and then risk choking or swallowing them. Ensure that your child’s safety seat is approved the age and weight that they are.

9-12 months: Keep your baby away from sharp edged or hard furniture. Refrain from giving your little one balloons. The balloons could pop and block their airway. Baby is going to be on the move at this age and interested in everything. Watch out for stoves, wall or floor heaters, ironing boards, and other hot appliances. The bathroom is an o-limits area for your baby. Use gates to keep them out of bathrooms as well as stairways.

0-4 months: Make sure you have eyes on your baby at all times. If your baby is left alone on a changing table, on a bed, in a bathtub, or with very young children, you risk your baby getting hurt. The bath temperature should stay between 120 degrees and 130 degrees (Fahrenheit) to avoid scalding from the water. Test with your elbow. Always support your baby’s head when holding or moving him or her anywhere. Do not lay baby on things like water beds, beanbag chairs, or any surface that is soft and moveable that could potentially cover the baby’s face and block his or her airpassage.

Crib slats wider than 2.5 inches apart can trap baby’s head. Lookout for gaps that look dangerous, as well as the side of baby’s crib. Their arms and legs could get trapped too. Keep your baby/infant in a car seat facing the back of the car until they are at least 20 lbs.

Never shake a baby for any reason or allow anyone else to!

Safety MUSTS for all families: 1. Keep baby away from second-hand smoke. 2. Install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in your home. 3. Poisonous household items should be out of reach for baby. The poison center phone number should be readily available in case of emergency as well. 4. Cover all electrical outlets. No smoking, drinking, or carrying hot liquids while holding your baby. 5. In the case of your baby getting burned, immediately immerse the burned area in cold water to soothe until he or she stops crying. Then cover the burn loosely with a bandage or clean cloth. Contact your doctor once baby is settled.

Keep Your Child Safe in the Car

If your baby is loose in a moving vehicle, it can create a deadly situation. Here’s how to best protect your baby while transporting in a vehicle.

1. Protect your baby from passenger side air bags.

Infants in rear-facing car seats should NEVER sit in the front seat of a vehicle with a passenger-side air bag. Children should always be placed in the rear seat. If children over the age of one must ride in the front seat of a vehicle that contain passenger-side air bags, make sure the child is in a front facing safety seat, booster seat, or correct fitting lap/shoulder belt.

2. Keep your child in a car seat.

Children weighing over 20 lbs and over the age of one year are allowed to face forward.

3. Once your child is over 40 lbs and too tall for the car seat switch to a booster seat. Booster seats are necessary until they are big enough to just use a seat belt.

“Hey Mom! Look Newborns Can...

2 month olds Can... Hold head upright for short time Smile at you when you give them attention Coo, especially when you do it with them Recognize your voice and touch Try... Smiling, talking, singing, and cooing to baby Holding your baby during all feedings Massaging baby for a few minutes after a bath Put baby’s cheek to yours and look in mirror Play music your baby enjoys

4 month olds Can... Control head when held upright or put in sitting position Open hands, reach for objects, hold rattle Follow family members and objects with eyes Smile, coo, laugh aloud, squeal Try... Talking in dierent tones to baby and repeating baby’s sounds Play with mirrors (talking in it, touching, and kissing it) Continue to hold for feedings Play pat-a-cake with hands and feet Show baby safe toys

See about 10-12 Inches from their eyes Enjoy looking at human faces Follow a slowly moving object with eyes Recognize human voice and respond to it Move both arms and legs Try... Looking into baby’s eyes and talking to him/her Holding your baby during all feedings Rocking, cuddling, stroking, and singing to baby GIving lots of love and attention

What I Can Do!” 6 month olds Can... Roll over

9 month olds Can... Sit well Creep on hands Crawl or scoot on bottom Grasp objects with fingers and thumb Understand a few words and own name Try... Playing hide and seek with toy under blanket Giving baby pots and pans of dierent sizes Playing puppet or with safe spin and pull toys Calling baby by name and teaching body parts Repeating baby’s sounds

12 months Can... Imitate household chores (dusting, sweeping, etc) Point, bang objects together, fit objects inside each other Stand by themself, walk with help, take few steps by themself

Sit with support, lean forward on hands when seated, scoot and crawl Look and grab at objects Laughs, squeals, babbles, blow bubbles, imitates speech sounds Reaches for toys and objects Try... Holding baby only for breast and bottle feeding Reading books and colorful magazines to baby Teaching animal sounds with images Cuddling, singing, and playing peek-a-boo

Say one to three words in addition to “da da” and “ma ma”

Try... Pointing to and naming objects Talking to baby during common activities

Rocking, kissing, cuddling, singing, and loving baby

Allowing baby to feed themself some foods from spoon and cup.

Grandpa & Grandma Grandpas and Grandmas are so important to children’s lives. They develop a special bond together, and truly make each other feel alive. If you are a grandpa or grandma that takes care

of a young child: Congratulations! You get to provide a sense of care and

security for this little one, but make sure you stay

informed of current health, nutrition, and safety advice.

oddle

your ball full of energy

This is the age where your child wil be changing and growing right before your eyes. But, that doesn’t mean your baby won’t still need help with most things. You, or someone you trust, will have to keep your eye on your curious kid at all times. Reading, singing, and playing are still essential to helping them grow. And most importantly, you have to set limits on what they do, so you can keep them safe. Creating a routine is very beneficial for helping your toddler feel safe and comfortable. For example, try to stick to the same times for eating and sleeping. You can’t control what goes on outside your home, but you can control what happens inside of it. Make your home a safe and secure place for your child.

Disciplining your children can be very dicult, but very important. When they are young, it’s to keep them safe

from things like stairs, hot stoves, and moving cars. How can you implement discipline into your home? 1. Be consistent. 2. Set limits and clear consequences, such as time-out or no TV time.

3. Understand your kid and give them a healthy routine of eating, napping, and resting. No one enjoys being sick, tired, hungry, or frustrated. 4. Pay attention to when you or others around your toddler are tense or angry. Kids are sensitive to those emotions. 5. Make sure you’re practicing your own self-control and discipline. Be a role

model for your child. Give yourself a break, keep your cool, ask for help.

LET KIDS BE KIDS Kids want to try everything, taste everything, touch everything, you

name it! Imagination and exploring are vital to growing, but can sometimes be dangerous. Some dangers to be aware of... 1. The smallest amount of water can drown your child. Watch them closely and never leave them near a bathtub, pail of water, wading or swimming pool, or other water source. 2. Put baby gates up around stairways and screens or window guards over windows. Also remove any sharp furniture. 3. Keep safety caps on all liquids, especially medicines, vitamins, liquor, and toxic household products. 4. Cover your electrical outlets 5. Keep hot appliances away from your child and ensure you have working smoke dectectors. 6. Always buckle your child up in their approved and age appropriate car seat. It’s the law. 7. Make sure you keep hot foods and liquids away from your baby.

What They Can Do

What You Can Do

What You Should Do Distract or remove them from dangerous situations Build a schedule for eating, sleeping, and playing Praise them for good behavior and accomplishments Give them independence and limits Remind them how special they are Let them know emotions of all kinds are good and let them express them

in regards to food...

Read stories and books

Eat with fingers

They may not be as hungry as when they were a baby... watch their appetite adjusting They don’t need a bottle anymore! Let them get used to using cups Cut food into small pieces and avoid foods they could choke on Let them learn to feed themselves. Yes, it will be messy, but this is important. Prepare for “food jags,” or when they only want to eat one or two foods and those foods only. Just continue to get them to try other foods along with those.

Talk about your actions (what you feel, see, hear)

Drink from cup

Speak 3-6 words

Play games that are interactive (Tag, ball, race, etc.)

Identify 2-3 body parts

Recognize family members

Sing songs with them

Spend quality time cuddling and talking

Walks well and is beginning to climb and run

Listen to their thoughts

Scribble

Allow them to watch some tv, but screen and limit it

Stack blocks

Don’t be embarrassed of “baby talk!” Talking to your toddler in high, sing song-y tones, with animal noises, and repeating what they say actually is one of the best ways for your child to learn language.

15 months

18 months

What You Should Do

What They Can Do

What You Can Do

in regards to food...

Oer them snacks and meals around the same time each day Pay attention when they are eating. Especially when they are eating foods that could be easy to choke on Let them try raw vegetables with dips, salad dressings, or peanut butter Allow them one piece of fruit for a snack or part of their meal each day

Play dolls, trucks, blocks, or games with them Keep cuddling, holding, or rocking them Read books or stories and talk about daily activities Sing songs with them and listen to music together Visit the zoo and teach them about the animals that they are seeing

Set specific limits (”I love you, but I do

Take o their clothes

not want you to throw things.”)

Eat with spoon or fork

Stack 3-4 blocks

Keep discipline positive, but consistent

Dump objects out of containers

Give them choices so they learn to make decisions themselves (Do you want this snack or that snack)

Speak 15-20 words

Say short phrases

Understand simple directions

Praise them for good behavior and accomplishments

Incorporate fruit into cereal, pancakes, waes, or desserts

Run, walk backwards, and climb steps

Do not expect them to be potty trained yet

Ask questions

It’s amazing how much energy can be in one little kid! You’re going to try and keep up, but remember that you are allowed to give yourself a break from time to time.

What You Should Do

What They Can Do

2 years

Brush their teeth with help

Tell your toddler they are special, good, and very loved

Wash and dry their hands

Praise them for good behavior and accomplisments

Put clothes on with little help

Stack 6 blocks

Be prepared for lack of toy sharing at this age

Speech is mostly understandable

Give them limits, but allow for safe ventures Distract or remove them from dangerous situations Enforce short “time outs” for unwanted behavior in regards to food...

Likes to imitate older children and adults

Throw and kick ball

Easily identifies family members What You Can Do

Plan 3 meals and 2 snacks for them each day

Play in the park or yard

Make sure your toddler tries each food at meal time

Give them quiet activities like coloring, puzzles, and blocks

If they refuse to try something, do not force them

Keep up the cuddling!

Look at picture books and discuss them

Don’t make food a reward or bribe

Ask them questions

Have them help you prepare the food (wash vegetables and fruit and mix ingredients) Give them a variety of food to learn their likes and dislikes (they will change often)

Have them help out with simple tasks like sorting socks, making cookies, and picking up toys

Encourage expression and be willing to listen

Stable and nurturing homes give children a lot of ease in a stressful world. This is why creating a consistent routine for them will be beneficial in the long run.

Oral Health for Toddlers

Doctor Visits

Your child should now be drinking from a cup, not a bottle. If you are still breastfeeding, be sure to give your child water and other liquids in cups.

Be sure to call the doctor if your child ... - Is having trouble breathing - Has a fever - Is vomiting frequently - Refuses to eat - Becomes unusually fussy or irritable - Has runny or watery stool - Develops a rash - Just doesn’t seem like themself Continue to check in with your doctor every so often to stay up to date on changes in medicine, new vaccines, and new ways to stay healthy Be sure to stay on top of your child’s immunizations, the schedule on the next page will help you do so.

Teach your toddler to brush after each meal and before bed.

All primary teeth, or “baby teeth,” should be in by now. Permanent teeth will be beginning to form now. If you child is struggling to let go of their pacifier or still frequently sucks their fingers or thumb, you should try to break the habit now. Substitue a favorite toy or blanket.

Immunization Schedule Vaccine Birth 1 mo 2 mos 4 mos 6 mos 9 mos 12 mos 15 mos Hepatitis B (HepB) 1st dose 2nd dose 3rd dose

catch up immunizations if you are not

Rotavirus (RV)

1st dose 2nd dose Ask Doc

Diphtheria, tetanus, & acellular pertussis (DTaP: <7yrs) Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

1st dose 2nd dose 3rd dose

4th

catch up immunizations if you are not

catch up immunizations if you are not

1st dose 2nd dose Ask Doc

3rd or 4th dose

Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13)

catch up immunizations if you are not

4th dose

1st dose 2nd dose 3rd dose

Inactivated poliovirus (IPV: <18rs)

1st dose 2nd dose 3rd dose

Influenza

Annual vaccination 1 or 2 doses

Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR)

Ask Doc

1st dose

Varicella (VAR)

1st dose

Hepatitis A (HepA)

Ask Doc

2 dose series,

Meningococcal

Ask Doc

Tetamus, diphtheria, & acellular pertussis (TDaP > 7yrs) Human Papillomarvirus (HPV)

Meningoccal B (MenB)

Pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPSV23)

Name: _______________________________________

Birth date: ____________________________________ 18 mos 19-23 mos 2-3 yrs 4-6 yrs 7-10 yrs 11-12 yrs 13-15 yrs 16 yrs 17-18 yrs

catch up immunizations if you are not

5th dose

dose

catch up immunizations if you are not

Ask Doc

catch up immunizations if you are not

Ask Doc

catch up immunizations if you are not

4th dose

catch up immunizations if you are not

Annual vaccination 1 dose only

Annual vaccination 1 or 2 doses

2nd dose

catch up immunizations if you are not

2nd dose

catch up immunizations if you are not

Ask Doc

Ask Doc

catch up immunizations if you are not

catch up immunizations if you are not

catch up immunizations if you are not

1st dose

2nd dose

Ask Doc

Ask Doc

catch up immunizations if you are not

Tdap

catch up immunizations if you are not

Ask Doc

catch up immunizations if you are not

Ask Doc

Ask Doc

We know having this baby is all new, scary, and exciting. But with HSHS hospitals on your side, there’s nothing you should be scared of when getting ready for your baby. Ready or not, here comes baby!

YOU’VE GOT THIS

In Case of Emergency...

Doctor _____________________________

Dentist _____________________________

Emergency _____________________________

Hospital _____________________________

Police _____________________________

Fire _____________________________

Pharmacy _____________________________

Posion Control 1-800-942-5969

To report child abuse 1-800-25ABUSE (252-2873)

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