ReddyCare: Relieving Low Back Hip and Knee Arthritis

N E W S L E T T E R PHYSICAL AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY FOR ARTHRITIS

Arthritis treatment may include physical therapy and/or occupational therapy. People with arthritis often have stiff joints -- largely because they avoid movements that can increase pain. By not moving arthritic joints, however, the stiffness and pain only get worse. Therefore, people with arthritis often benefit from physical therapy. A physical therapist can teach you how to work out stiffness without further damaging your joint. Physical therapy also is useful after an injury, such as from a fall, and after joint surgery, especially for artificial joint replacement. Occupational therapy can teach you how to reduce strain on your joints during daily activities. Occupational therapists can show you how tomodify your home and workplace environments to reduce motions that may aggravate arthritis. They also may provide splints for your hands or wrists, and recommend assistive devices to aid in tasks such as driving, bathing, dressing, housekeeping, and certain work activities. What Is the Goal of Physical Therapy? The goal of physical therapy is to get a person back to the point where he or she can perform normal, everyday activities without difficulty. Preserving good range of motion is key to maintain the ability to perform daily activities. Therefore, increasing the range of motion of a joint is the primary focus of physical therapy. Building strength in the involved muscles surrounding the joint also is extremely important, since stronger muscles can better stabilize a weakened joint. Physical therapists provide exercises designed to preserve the strength and use of your joints. They can show you the best way to move from one position to another and can also teach you how to use walking aids such as crutches, a walker or a cane, if necessary.

What Are Some Benefits of Occupational and Physical Therapy? If you have arthritis, there are many benefits to participating in a physical and occupational therapy program, including: • You gain education about your type of arthritis, so that you can be well informed. • You gain foot-care advice, including information on well-fitting shoes with shock-absorbing outer soles and sculptured (orthotic) insoles molded exactly to the contour of each foot. • You will learn therapeutic methods to relieve discomfort and improve performance through various physical techniques and activity modifications. An occupational therapist can show you ways to do everyday tasks without worsening pain or causing joint damage. Some joint protection techniques include: • Using proper body mechanics for getting in and out of a car, chair or tub, as well as for lifting objects. • Using your strongest joints and muscles to reduce the stress on smaller joints. For example, carrying a purse or briefcase with a shoulder strap rather than with your hand. • Distributing pressure to minimize stress on any one joint. Lifting dishes with both palms rather than with your fingers and carrying heavy loads in your arms instead of with your hands. • If your hands are affected by arthritis, avoid tight gripping, pinching, squeezing, and twisting. Ways to accomplish the same tasks with alternate methods or tools can usually be found. Call today to start your recovery journey with Reddy-Care Physical & Occupational Therapy!

(WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by David Zelman, MD on April 21, 2017)

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