Risk Services Of Arkansas August 2017

SPECIALIZING IN YOU

Agriculture

Ministries

Education

Environmental

Hospitality

Not-For-Profit

Technology

August 2017

Financial

Construction

Energy

Health Care

Manufacturing

Staffing

Transportation

Learning Outside the Classroom THE NECESSITY FOR ACTIVELY SEEKING KNOWLEDGE

you’ve spent some time figuring out your own learning style, and that is a key indicator that you’ll continue striving towards true learning in the real world. I believe that if you want to be successful, you need to be equipped with that passion for learning that will propel you forward through your career and your life. That’s why, as I’ve talked about before, I’m always reading, searching for the tools and wisdom that can guide me. Each morning, I set aside at least an hour to sit down with my books. I’ll first read the Bible — faith is such a huge part of my life, and the wisdom given in those pages is unparalleled — and then I’ll move on to other books that help me understand the principles and precepts of the Bible. When that is done, I might tackle a business book, or a leadership book, or simply a book that strives to help me be a better person. The last book I finished, “Ask More” by Frank Sesno, is the perfect example of out-of-school learning that applies to every facet of life. In the book, Sesno stresses that the quality of the information we glean — from clients,

All the way through formal education, from junior high to high school to college, there’s one thing nobody ever tells you until you graduate and make your way out to the real world: School alone can’t prepare you for the rest of your life and career. I have a deep respect for the teachers and facilitators of organized education — and I’m a huge advocate for getting as much education as you can — but that fact is true. When a high school student in chemistry asks “When are we going to use this?” the answer is probably “Never.” Unless you’re in a highly technical, specialized field, there’s little chance you’ll directly apply the concepts you learn in class to your everyday work. However, what school does prepare you for is further learning outside of the confines of the classroom. When I look at a resumé, what a college degree tells me is not that you’re going to instantly understand your job, but that you’re teachable, you know how to learn, and hopefully, you are able to apply an evolving body of knowledge. Not only that, but it shows that

friends, or family — is directly based on the quality of the questions that you ask. After the many years I’ve spent doing risk management, it’s relatively easy to figure out the basic risk management and insurance needs of my clients. However, it’s their motivations, their desires, their goals, their problems, where they want to be and why they want to get there and how we can help that are more difficult to determine. All I know is that if we learn to ask better questions, we’ll be able to serve our clients better and on a much deeper level. It’s just one example of the necessity for the drive to learn, past the point at which you graduate organized education. Sure, school equips you with many of the basics, but to really grow as a person you have to do it yourself. It takes a spirit of curiosity, humility, persistence, and imagination to push the limits of your knowledge forward. None of us have all the answers, but I think it’s our job to consistently search for them. understand your job, but that you’re teachable, you know how to learn, and hopefully, you are able to apply an evolving body of knowledge ... When I look at a resumé, what a college degree tells me is not that you’re going to instantly

– Brad Johnson

President, Risk Services of AR Specialized Insurance Programs For Specialized Industries. • www.insurica.com • 1

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