NowX March 2019

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ensuing years, Bird’s Celtics and Magic’s Lakers would trade shots in an epic tussle for NBA supremacy, but it all started here.

KRIS JENKINS FTW (2016)

CHRIS WEBBER’S TIMEOUT (1993)

The most stunning moment in recent tournament history came from Villanova’s forward Kris Jenkins and his team. The Philadelphia-area school had not won a title in more than 20 years when they made the championship game in 2016. Their duel with North Carolina in that game was one for the ages — a back-and-forth affair that was tied 74-74 before the final possession. The ball came to Jenkins, who chucked a deep three as time expired, and the buzzer sounded as the ball went through the rim. “When I get it,” Jenkins told reporters after the game, “it’s going up. I always think it’s going in, and this was no different.” It was no different, except for the fact that most shots aren’t destined to be remembered for decades. Which moments from this year will end up leaving an indelible imprint on the sport? You’ll have to tune in to find out.

Michigan’s Fab Five (Chris Webber, Jalen Rose, Juwan Howard, Jimmy King, and Ray Jackson) are the most famous recruiting class in college basketball history. They transformed the sport by injecting a healthy dose of what we know today as “swag.” After reaching the finals of the tournament as freshmen— an unheard-of achievement at the time — theWolverines were expected to romp to a title in 1993. Everything went according to plan until the final when Chris Webber committed basketball’s most famous blunder. Down by two points with 20 seconds left, Webber secured a rebound and headed up the court. The North Carolina defense smartly used a trap defense to funnel him into the corner. Panicked and out of real estate, Webber signaled for a timeout. The problem was that Michigan didn’t have any. As an automatic technical foul, Webber’s gaffe secured North Carolina’s victory.

N.C. STATE’S LAST-SECOND UPSET (1983)

March Madness is known for underdog stories, and few are more inspirational than N.C. State’s shocking upset of Houston in the 1983 title game. Houston, known as Phi Slamma Jamma for their above-the-rim playstyle, was on a 26-game winning streak and heavily favored to make mincemeat of the Wolfpack. But that’s not what happened. With the game tied and time expiring, N.C. State’s DereckWhittenburg had the ball near the top of the key. He heaved up a prayer of a shot that came down well short of the basket. However, his teammate Lorenzo Charles caught the ball as if the errant shot were a perfectly placed alley-oop. He slammed the ball, time expired, and the entire stadiumwent wild. Jim Valvano, N.C. State’s coach, was so overcome that he ran around the court in utter disbelief.

Keep This OffYour Breakfast Table Sugary Cereals Are No Better Than Candy

Honey Smacks is the worst of the two because it contains hydrogenated vegetable oil — one of the unhealthiest food-based oils you can consume. This type of oil keeps the cereal shelf-stable for longer, but the American Heart Association points to it as a major dietary cause of heart disease. Many other cereals are just as bad, including Kellogg’s Froot Loops and General Mills Trix. These two cereals hide behind the guise of “fruit,” which many people associate with better nutrition. But you won’t find balanced nutrition in either of these cereals. Froot Loops is just under 50 percent sugar by weight, and Trix is just under 40 percent. Both cereals also contain artificial food dyes and flavorings. Trix also contains corn syrup, which has been linked to the rising rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes. When you eat 10 grams of sugar in any form—which is in just one cup of Trix — or more, depending on the cereal, you can expect a spike in blood sugar. A blood sugar spike early in the morning can often translate to low energy later in the day. Over time, a diet high in sugar can lead to insulin resistance, which can lead to the development of type 2 diabetes.

It’s no secret that most breakfast cereals are loaded with sugar and carbs. Starting your day with a hefty bowl will inevitably give you a sugar high that crashes into a haze of fatigue not long after. What’s worse, however, is that some cereals are even more unhealthy than you might realize. Do you remember the old Reese’s Puffs slogan: “Candy?! For breakfast?” Reality isn’t far off. Kellogg’s Honey Smacks and Post Golden Crisp are two of the biggest offenders when it comes to sugar content. By weight, Honey Smacks and Golden Crisp are more than 50 percent sugar. That’s more sugar than your average cake or cookie. And there isn’t much more nutritional value to make up for the excess sugar. These puffed rice cereals contain less than two grams of protein and one gram of fiber per serving, which is remarkably low. For reference, Honey Smacks lists 1 1/4 cups as a serving, while Golden Crisp considers 3/4 cup a serving. That said, most people don’t measure out food based on the recommended serving size. With these two cereals, the combination of puffed rice and a lack of protein means you won’t feel full until you’ve overindulged. By eating twice the recommended serving (about two cups), you’ve consumed the same amount of sugar found in one can of soda.

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