Richardson - March 2020

RICHARDSON EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 7  MARCH 18APRIL 22, 2020

ONLINE AT

“OURREQUESTWAS MADE AFTERWORKING FORMORE THANA DECADE TOGET RELIEF FOROUR TAXPAYERS.” RICHARDSON, PLANO, GARLAND AND MESQUITE OFFICIALS

Impacts

Government

Windmill Stables

Tacos YMas

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Unifyin COLLEGE Use of the death penalty for criminals in Texas has seen a precipitous decline in recent years. In Collin County, capital punishment was practically obsolete—at least until Feb. 27, when a jury handed down a death sen- tence for the rst time in 11 years. Brandon McCall was found guilty and sen- tenced to death for the murders of his friend Rene Gamez II and Richardson Police Ocer David Sherrard. The death penalty forMcCall signaled that while the practice is far less common, juries will still impose it for crimes they deem to be the most egregious. Themorality of the death penalty has been debated for years, but what sometimes gets forgotten is the toll capital punishment can Death penalty costs explained Sherrard’s killer sentenced BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER CONTINUED ON 18

EXAMINING THE COST Each county in Texas pays for its trials and appeals in death penalty cases, which are longer and more expensive to carry out. These gures are based on a 1992 study and are adjusted for ination.

$1.3M Average cost of life without parole

LOCAL DEFENDANTS ON DEATH ROW

There are inmates awaiting execution in Texas. 213

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SOURCES: LAW OFFICE OF TEXAS DEFENSE ATTORNEY FRED DAHR, 2015; TEXAS COALITION TO ABOLISH THE DEATH PENALTY; TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

$3.8M Average cost of death penalty

sentenced in Collin County.

sentenced in Tarrant County. 16

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Brandon McCall was sentenced to death Feb. 27 for the 2018 murder of David Sherrard, the rst Richardson police ocer to be killed in the line of duty.

sentenced in Dallas County.

DallasCommunityCollegeDistrict seeks change toboost student graduation rates

By seeking a single accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Dallas County Community College District hopes to increase its graduation rates. 25% To graduate, students must receive at least of their credits from one college. 1,356 students have been unable to graduate due to this policy.

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

institution. This has created issues for so-called “swirl students,” or those who take courses at more than one of the district’s seven campuses. “About 13% of our entire student population [is swirl students],” said Kay Eggleston, president of Richland College, the DCCCD campus closest to Richardson. Over the years, the 25% rule has rendered more than 1,300 students

Students in the Dallas County Com- munity College District who were previously deemed ineligible to grad- uate could soon benet from a new accreditation initiative. The decision to seek a single accred- itation for the district’s seven college is due in part to a policy administered by Southern Association of Colleges and Schools that requires students to take 25% of their credit hours at one

Richland is one of seven DCCCD schools. (Makenzie Plusnick/Community Impact Newspaper)

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SOURCE: DALLAS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

communityimpact.com

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