CellCheck Newsletter September 2019 FINAL

September Edition 2019

ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

CellCheck NEWSLETTER

PROGRAMME NEWS | 03

www.AnimalHealthIreland.ie

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR | 06 CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH | 09 RESEARCH UPDATE | 11 SERVICE PROVIDER NOTES | 12

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27

AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of our stakeholders.

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41WN27

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie

CELLCHECK PROGRAMME

Programme news

Finola McCoy, Programme Manager

W elcome to this month’s CellCheck newsletter. While it may seem a little premature, the focus of this month’s newsletter is on drying off cows……..because it is never too early to start preparing for the most important job of the year! Many people consider drying off cows as the last job of the season, with a chance to have a break afterwards. However, maybe we should think about it as the first job of 2020, one that you can do before things start to get really hectic?! This month’s top tip looks at things that we can do in the lead up to drying off, that can help us get the best outcome possible. Take your time-the goal is to dry off the last cow as well as you did the first! Our research feature looks at the risk factors during drying off and the dry period that affect the rate of clinical mastitis after calving. Remember, what happens at drying off can make or break your 2020 lactation. Short cuts taken now will cost you in the long run. We have taken a different approach to our guest contributor’s piece this month. This month we have an interview by Fionnuala Malone, Senior Milk Quality Manager, Glanbia Ireland with Martin Davin, a dairy farmer from Laois. Martin has moved to a selective drying off strategy and has now four years’ experience. Martin is also one of the host farmers for our on-farm CellCheck events this autumn. With the right hygiene, management and support, many herds are successfully reducing their antibiotic use at drying off. For anyone considering a selective dry cow strategy this year (even just putting a toe in the water!), don’t forget that there is support available for herd owners (eligibility criteria apply). Applications are still being accepted from herd owners for free Dry Cow Consults, delivered through the Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health, funded by the Rural Development Programme and coordinated by Animal Health Ireland. Applications will be accepted until the end of November, although in the event of over-subscription, eligible herds will be selected according to the timing of their applications….so don’t delay! For more information and online applications click here . Finally, don’t miss the opportunity to come along to one the CellCheck on-farm events this autumn. Commencing on September 30 th , in partnership with Teagasc and the local co-ops, AHI will be running these events over a 3-week period.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | September Edition 2019

CELLCHECK ON-FARM EVENTS Teagasc | Animal Health Ireland Rule changes to antibiotic use on dairy farms is coming ARE YOU READY? | i l lt I l l i i i i

SELECTIVE DRY COW STRATEGY – THIS FARM’S EXPERIENCE I I ’

IRISH RESEARCH ON SELECTIVE DRY COW STRATEGIES I I I

PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATIONS - HOW BEST TO DRY OFF COWS? I I -

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If you want to learn more about any of these topics, come along to one of the Animal Health Ireland/Teagasc CellCheck Open Days If l f i , l f i l l I l ll

ANTIBIOTICS – WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD? I I I T D ES FUTURE HOLD?

APPLYING FOR A FREE ‘DRY COW CONSULT’ I FREE ‘DRY COW ’

FOR INFORMATION: www.animalhealthireland.ie 071 96 71928 F I I : . i l ealt ir l .i

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41WN27 I I I ni al ealth Ireland, 4-5 The rch ays, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitri , 41 27

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CELLCHECK ON-FARM EVENTS Teagasc | Animal Health Ireland Rule changes to antibiotic use on dairy farms is coming ARE YOU READY? l i i i i

ON FARM VENUE | START TIME: 11.00 AM

DATES MON 30 SEP TUE 01 OCT WED 02 OCT THURS 03 OCT FRI 04 OCT MON 07 OCT TUE 08 OCT WED 09 OCT THURS 10 OCT FRI 11OCT MON 14 OCT TUE 15 OCT WED 16 OCT THURS 17 OCT

EIRCODE

Richard Starrett, Killendaragh, Lifford, Co. Donegal. Supported by Aurivo

F93 VH30

George Chambers, Rathganny, Multyfarnham, Co. Westmeath. Supported by Lakeland Dairies

N91 TF34

Gerard Sherlock, Tydavnet, Co. Monaghan. Supported by Lakeland Dairies Martin Davin, Eglish, Rathdowney, Co. Laois. Supported by Glanbia Ireland

H18 HY66

R32 YE00

Kevin Muldoon &Mella Briscoe, Cloncela, Ballycrissane, Portumna, Co. Galway. Supported by Arrabawn Patrick & Noreen Cronin, Cahirkereen, Kilnamartyra, Macroom, Co Cork. Supported by Dairygold Peter Hughes & Paul Maguire, Carron, Tipperary, Co. Tipperary. Supported by Tipperary Co-op Thomas & Christine Curran, Churchquarter, Cappagh, Dungarvan, Co. Waterford. Supported by Glanbia Ireland IRISH RESEARCH ON SELECTIVE DRY COW STRATEGIES John O’Connor, Ballindrohid Farm, Currans, Farranfore, Co. Kerry. Supported by Kerry Agribusiness John & Jimmy Bourke, Rathcunikeen, Two-Mile-Borris, Thurles, Co. Tipperary. Supported by Centenary Thurles Donal Buckley, Mountnorth, Ballyclough, Co. Cork. Supported by Dairygold Jonathan Nyhan, Reacarrigeen, Ballinascarthy, Co. Cork. Supported by Lisavaird/Carbery William Stack, Moyvane South, Listowel, Co Kerry. Supported by North Cork Creameries Salesian Agricultural College, Pallaskenry, Co. Limerick. Supported by Kerry Agribusiness If you want to arn more about any of these topics, come along to one of the Animal Health Ireland/Teagasc CellCheck Open Days

H53 CP21

SELECTIVE DRY COW STRATEGY – THIS FARM’S EXPERIENCE

PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATIONS - HOW BEST TO DRY OFF COWS?

P12 XW98

E34 FH94

X35 R620

V93 EN22

E41 W253

P51 FX52

P85 Y516

V31 TD60

V94 X991

ANTIBIOTICS – WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD?

APPLYING FOR A FREE ‘DRY COW CONSULT’

FOR INFORMATION: www.animalhealthireland.ie 071 96 71928

This series of CellCheck events is being run with the help and support of the local Co-op in each region.

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41WN27 I I ni al ealth Ireland, 4-5 The rch ays, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitri , 41 27 I

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Selective Dry Cow Strategies

Fionnuala Malone, Glanbia Ireland

Martin Davin , Dairy Farmer

This autumn a series of on-farm events are being held around the country to prepare farmers for the upcoming legislative changes and developments in the use of antibiotics when drying off cows. These events are a partnership between AHI, Teagasc and the Dairy Co-ops. Fionnuala Malone, Senior Milk Quality Manager with Glanbia Ireland talks to one of the host farmers Martin Davin of Rathdowney, Co. Laois about his drying off practices and the reasons why he has developed a selective drying off strategy for his farm.

Q. Why the move to a selective drying off strategy? I could see it coming down the road, and it made sense to move towards using less antibiotics especially with everyone talking now about the build-up of Antimicrobial Resistance. We only treated 50% of the herd last year and it worked really well. Q. How long are you doing it and what is your new routine? Four years – it’s working well. We use information from five milk recordings and the ICBF report to select cows that have been under 100,000 cells/ml all year, have had no mastitis and have good udders, teats etc. We then also review cows at 120,000 cells/ml to see if any of these should be considered.

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | September Edition 2019

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CELLCHECK DRY-COW STRATEGY

Q. What do you use? We use a sealer on everything. Then we sample a selection of cows and heifers across the herd for milk culturing at Glanbia’s lab, and use the results to pick out the right antibiotic tube for those that need to be tubed. Q. How does the drying off day itself run? Its days! We aim to dry off between 10 – 24 cows only each day. We find by doing this we have enough time to do it as hygienically as possible. The week before we select out the cows being dried off, and restrict their diet by feeding straw and silage for a week. This helps avoid having cows running milk. The cows’ tails and udders are all clipped and singed the week before to make them as clean as possible. On the day, we milk the cows, draft and mark red those being dried off, teat disinfect and then go in to have breakfast. Once we’re fed, we get started. I clean the teats using surgical spirits and strong paper. I don’t like using cotton wool as I find it dissolves and goes everywhere. We then either: • treat with an antibiotic, then sterilise again with surgical spirits, and then tube with the sealer. • or we just seal the cows after using the surgical spirits. • When we’re finished, we use teat disinfectant on them. We wear gloves – and I have plenty of help. One person restrains the cows, I treat the cows. Q. How are your SCC trends going now? This year our SCC is approx. 50,000 cells/mL for the year so we are delighted with our trends and there was absolutely no ill effect on any cows not treated. We now milk record very early to track how the drying off went. Q. In spring how do you manage the cows? During the dry period we focus on making sure the cubicles are clean and limed. As soon as the cows spring up, we get them into the straw bedded area. We don’t spare straw. If it is not nice enough to lie down yourself, you shouldn’t calve a cow there. We also feed at night time. Q. How important is milk recording? Essential!

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | September Edition 2019

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CELLCHECK DRY-COW STRATEGY

Q. How do you identify the cows that receive each treatment? We mark all cows being dried off with red spray. If they have only been teat sealed then they get a green leg band too. Then at calving, if this leg band is lost, the cow will be regarded as having been treated with antibiotics. We find that’s safer than banding the cows that received antibiotic treatments. We have been delighted with how our drying off strategy has worked for us and I look forward to having a chat at the event in October with anyone who has questions about my results and any issues I had. It is more work but so easy to manage once you get going. It is probably not for everyone – if you haven’t enough cubicles or you are under pressure for accommodation in sheds, I suggest you wait until these are sorted and you are ready to do it.

For Martin, he feels the keys to his success have been: • Preparation • Planning • SCC Information • Clean cows • Hygienic drying off technique • Plenty of cubicles and cubicle space • Liming cubicles

The CellCheck Open Day is taking place on Martin Davin’s farm Eglish, Rathdowney, Co. Laois (Eircode R32 YE00) on Thursday 3rd of October at 11am. All are welcome.

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | September Edition 2019

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CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH

Plan ahead for drying off!

[Click here] for previously published tips

Every cow needs a dry period! This is the time when mammary tissue regenerates, repairs and prepares to produce milk again. It is also the period when cows have an opportunity to reach the optimal body condition score, in preparation for calving and the start of the next breeding cycle. While you may not be planning to dry off the herd just yet, there are things that you can do now to make sure that you are ready and prepared! 1. Organise help, in plenty of time! → Remember, when done properly and hygienically, drying off cows is a slow and tedious job. If your goal is to dry off the last cow as well as you did the first cow, then don’t try and do more than 20 cows at a time. 2. Have the necessary gear ready → Have disposable gloves, teat wipes/cotton wool and methylated spirits and intramammary tubes organised. → Invest in a head torch so you can see what you’re doing! 3. Manage production levels in advance, if necessary → Review expected calving dates – plan so the cow has a minimum of 6 weeks dry, and preferably 8 weeks. → Where cows are yielding > 12 L /day in the week before you plan to dry them off, reduce feed intake, but not water access.

4. Consider drying off some animals early → Dry off low yielding cows (< 9 litres / day) earlier than the planned date. → 1st lactation animals will often benefit from a longer dry period.

→ Drying off high SCC cows means they won’t keep pushing your bulk tank SCC up. It also means they are not a source of new mastitis infections for other cows. And if you need another reason, cure rates from antibiotic dry cow therapy (DCT) are usually better than treatment during lactation!

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | September Edition 2019

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PLAN AHEAD FOR DRYING OFF!

5. Milk record the herd → Having recent and up-to-date individual cow information is an absolute necessity if you are considering a selective dry cow strategy i.e. only treating selected cows with antibiotic at drying off. → A milk recording towards the end of lactation, followed by another in early 2020 will allow you to critically assess the dry period performance of your herd and identify future opportunities for improvement. 6. Discuss your treatment options in advance with your vet → Discuss appropriate DCT antibiotic selection, based on herd history, culture results, previous response rates etc. → Remember that a selective dry cow strategy is not without risk and is not something to embark on without seeking professional support and advice. → Consider applying for a free Dry Cow Consult (TASAH-funded). For more information, click here .

TIP

For more information and practical tips on drying off cows, see CellCheck Farm Guidelines for Mastitis Control-Guidelines 16 – 18 & Management Notes C – F

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | September Edition 2019

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RESEARCH UPDATE

J. Dairy Sci. 90:3764–3776 | doi:10.3168/jds.2007-0107 | © American Dairy Science Association, 2007.

Cow, Farm, and Management Factors During the Dry Period that Determine the Rate of Clinical Mastitis After Calving M. J. Green,*† 1 A. J. Bradley,‡ G. F. Medley,§ and W. J. Browne† ABSTRACT The purpose of the research was to investigate cow characteristics, farm facilities, and herd management strategies during the dry period to examine their joint influence on the rate of clinical mastitis after calving. Data were collected over a 2-yr period from 52 commercial dairy farms throughout England and Wales. Cows were separated for analysis into those housed for the dry period (8,710 cow-dry periods) and those at pasture (9,964 cow-dry periods). Multilevel models were used within a Bayesian framework with 2 response variables, the occurrence of a first case of clinical mastitis within the first 30 d of lactation and time to the first case of clinical mastitis during lactation. A variety of cow and herd management factors were identified as being associated with an increased rate of clinical mastitis and these were found to occur throughout the dry period. Significant cow factors were increased parity and at least one somatic cell count ≥200,000 cells/mL in the 90 d before drying off. A number of management factors related to hygiene were significantly associated with an increased rate of clinical mastitis. These included measures linked to the administration of dry cow treatments and management of the early and late dry-period accommodation and calving areas. Other farm factors associated with a reduced rate of clinical mastitis were vaccination with a leptospirosis vaccine, selection of dry-cow treatments for individual cows within a herd rather than for the herd as a whole, routine body condition scoring of cows at drying off, and a pasture rotation policy of grazing dry cows for a maximum of 2 wk before allowing the pasture to remain nongrazed for a period of 4 wk. Models demonstrated a good ability to predict the farm incidence rate of clinical mastitis in a given year, with model predictions explaining over 85% of the variability in the observed data. The research indicates that specific dry-period management strategies have an important influence on the rate of clinical mastitis during the next lactation.

KEY WORDS: mastitis, dry period, dairy cow, Bayesian multilevel model

*School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, LE12 5RD, United Kingdom †School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, United Kingdom ‡Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS40 5DT, United Kingdom §Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, United Kingdom 1 Corresponding author: martin.green@nottingham.ac.uk

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | September Edition 2019

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SERVICE PROVIDER NOTES

Free Dry Cow Consults

Applications are still being accepted from herd owners for free Dry Cow Consults, delivered through the Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health, funded by the Rural Development Programme and coordinated by Animal Health Ireland. Applications will be accepted until the end of November, although in the event of over-subscription, eligible herds will be selected according to the timing of their applications. NOTE: For veterinary practitioners who completed CellCheck TASAH training (October 2018), there will be a lunchtime webinar on September 20 th . You should already have received email notification of this, if not, contact the AHI office.

As part of the Rural Development Plan 2014- 2020, DAFM, in conjunction with the EU, are funding a Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health (TASAH) for farmers, delivered by trained veterinary practitioners. To date, the Service has focused on the following diseases of cattle: • Bovine Viral Diarrhoea (BVD) • Johne’s Disease (JD) • Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR) 2018 saw the commencement of the CellCheck TASAH service, delivering one to one Dry Cow Consults (DCC) to eligible farmers. This service will continue in 2019. Only PVPs who have been trained by AHI in relation to each disease will be eligible to provide the Service and to be paid by AHI on behalf of DAFM for its delivery. AHI have run multiple training events for delivery of CellCheck DCCs. A full list of trained vets who are available to conduct consults is available on the AHI website click here . Trained PVPs can prepare for and complete their consults by logging in to their account on the Service Provider Portal click here.

ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

Standard Operating Procedure for Trained Private Veterinary Practitioners

Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health - CellCheck Dry Cow Consult

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | September Edition 2019

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CELLCHECK REGIONAL COORDINATORS

A Resource and Point of Contact for CellCheck Activities in your Area

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Tom Starr 087 6697010

Mícheal Guinan 086 3511852 micheal.guinan@aurivo.ie Mayo/Sligo Aurivo

tstarr@arrabawn.ie Tipperary/Limerick National Co-op

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John Fitzpatrick 086 0426567

John Murphy 066 7163200 john.murphy@kerry.ie Kerry/Clare Kerry Agribusiness

fitzpatrickj@glanbia.ie Kilkenny/Laois/Carlow/ Kildare/Dublin Glanbia

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Aoife Feeney afeeney@carbery.com 087 3484901. West Cork Carbery Group

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Andrew O’Neill 086 1836505 aoneill@tipperary-coop.ie Tipperary Tipperary Co-Op

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Tom Downes 087 2564669

Denis Guiry 086 8098639 dguiry@dairygold.ie Cork/Tipperary/Limerick Dairygold

downest@lakeland.ie Longford/Monaghan Lakeland Dairies

Brendan Dillon 087 2626851 BrDillon@glanbia.ie

Cork/Waterford/ Wexford/Wicklow Glanbia

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | September Edition 2019

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