Byron Villager Jan:Feb 2020

Villager JAN/FEB 2020 ISSUE 47

Issue 40 Jan-Feb 2020 www.villagerpublications.com Managing Editor: Cathy Wood Cathy@VillagerPublications.com Sales: Gloria Rae Gloria@VillagerPublications.com 519-495-4564 Publisher: Barb Botten Villager Publications P.O. Box 134, Lambeth Station Ontario N6P 1P9 Barb@VillagerPublications.com 519-282-7262 Graphic Artist Cathy Wood Photos, article suggestions, article submissions welcome. We look forward to hearing from you: Cathy@villagerpublications.com

Back in the day

Byron Villager Issue #47 Jan/Feb 2020 www.villagerpublications.com Publisher and Editor Barb Botten Villager Publications P.O. Box 134, Lambeth Station Ontario N6P 1P9 Barb@VillagerPublications.com 519-282-7262 Graphic Artists Jon Botten To advertise: 519-282-7262 or barb@villagerpublications.com We look foward to hearing from you!

New

Byron’s own Vortex 5 See story on page 4

Springbank Park Horse Rides Circa 1970s

arts, entrepreneurs, business, urhood people and passion to to advertise. The 100% locally n times a year with thousands r local market.

We want your stories! Do you have a personal story, know of an event or perhaps have information that might lead to a story in the Byron Villager? We want to hear from you! Email Barb at barb@villagerpublications.com ! agerpublications.com don Public Lib ary

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Our Founder: Simon Zelotes Watson (1757-1814) By David McKelvey

Our community’s Founding Father has no monument: not even a plaque on the library wall...Nothing. Our Founder’s name was Simon Zelotes Watson. One of his detractors once said of him, in effect, that while he may have been named after Simon the Zealot, he didn’t exhibit many of the Saint’s characteristics. Perhaps, when you have finished reading the sad tale of this man’s contribution, you may also disagree with this statement. Simon Zelotes Watson was American born, a Loyalist and a surveyor from the hamlet of Hemmingford, Quebec, a stone’s throw from the American Border and about an hour’s drive south of Montreal. He was also a successful businessman and magistrate for the District of Montreal. He was hired as an agent by 210 Loyalist families to settle them in Upper Canada where the laws, culture and in particular, the language, was more to their liking. His task was to find them some land, survey it into lots and handle the details. For this he was to receive $100 (American currency) per settler of which $37.50 would go for government settlement fees while the remaining $62.50 would go to him for services rendered. We know nothing about S.Z.Watson’s physical characteristics except for one thing: he was approximately 53 years old, which is a tad long in the tooth for banging about in the woods in the creation of a new settlement! The task of surveying the frontier is not for softies. In Brantford he picked up eight novice Mohawks as his surveying crew; a rod man, two chainmen and five axemen. In addition to their duties as axemen, these men doubled as wild animal control. Wolves and bears notwithstanding, the worst tormentors were the blackflies and mosquitos who rose up out of the dank and putrid swamps to attack them in droves. Other obstacles, such as hills, endless trees and very inconvenient bodies of water,

(Pond Mills), created difficulties that frustrated a surveyor’s natural penchant for straight lines. SZW began his survey on May 28th, 1810 by hammering a black cherry marker into the ground in Dorchester. From it he blazed a trail through Westminster along what is now Southdale Road, marking off lots 20 chains wide by 100 chains deep with a one chain side road allowance every six lots, until he planted another stake in Delaware. Ordinarily, a 200 acre lot would be 30 chains wide by 68 chains deep (one chain = 66 feet), but SZW was hoping that the narrower width would make the likelihood of two “squatters” ending up on the same lot less likely, since no one could know ahead of time where the lot lines would fall. Still, Peter Hagerman’s farm wound up on the lot of his brother-in-law, Archie McMillan. By June 29th, SZW, his survey finished, was back at Putnam’s Hotel in Dorchester with his feet up and a brew in his hand. Early the next day he set out for Port Talbot. He had a business proposition for Colonel Talbot. This will be continued in the next issue of the Byron Villager.

Survey Party, 1793 David F. Thomson’s drawing of Surveyors of 1793 appeared in the Calendar of the Toronto Art Students League for 1897, one of a series of booklets that today are among the rare items of Canadiana.

Issue 47 - Jan/Feb 2020 Page 3

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Caught in the Vortex: Byron’s Vortex 5 By Barb Botten

What do you get when you take five long-time musician friends, four guitars, a keyboard and mix in a whole lot of laughs? Why, Byron’s own party band – Vortex 5 – of course! Bandmembers recently took time out from their rehearsal for the 3rd Annual January 25th, 2020 Night of Rock & Blues benefit concert for the LHSC Multi-Organ Transplant Unit Patient Assistance Fund at the London Music Club to tell their group’s story. The five musicians are all born and bred Byronites. Guitarist Paul Marshman – nickname Paul ‘Pit’ Marshman – has been playing for over 30 years. His nickname refers to a hockey trade many years ago between Chicago and Boston. Paul’s brother Cam Marshman – nickname F. Clive – also on guitar has been playing for 50+ years. He used to entertain the Byron community with his first band called 5th Hour at the Byron Teen Dances. Cam was also at the Woodstock concert in 1969. Gary Reed – nickname Gary ‘Zart’ Reed – plays keyboards. He has been playing for 25+ years. His nickname is shortened down from ‘Mozart’ due to his piano playing skills. Gary’s brother is Wayne Reed who played bass in another Byron band called The New Set featured in a previous Byron Villager. On guitar and harmonica is Mark Horne – nickname Mark ‘Horny’ Horne – just because well, that nickname was just too easy! He has been playing for 32+ years. Mark mentioned that 6 years ago, he broke his thumb. This injury affected his ability to play so he decided to give up the guitar. Three years ago, Bobbo Drake is credited with convincing Mark to get back to playing guitar and Mark appreciates the push. And, finally, Bobby ‘Bobbo’ Drake, who has been playing guitar for around 3 years. The band practices in Bobby’s heated Byron garage, nicknamed ‘Branch 1200’ for its friendly similarity to the Byron Legion, which is known as Branch 533. The nickname was contributed by Bob ‘Curly’ McMahon. The Marshman brothers went to both Byron Northview and Byron Southwood, while Mark and Bobby are Southwood alumni. Gary attended St George’s. Vortex 5 practise once a week and simply break out into song. One member will start, and the others will follow in. There is no leader or frontman, and everyone sings.

“We are like the Beatles, but without all the arguing,” says Cam. “We have a ton of fun. It’s a reason to hang out, have a brew and play music for fun.” Paul explains how the band got involved with Night of Rock & Blues. “Long time Byron friend, Andy ‘Monk’ Moncreiff stopped by the Branch one day and asked us to play at his function called Night of Rock & Blues,” recalls Paul. “Now, the story goes that Andy asked us to play although some have suggested it was more like we were told we were going to play.” All kidding aside, the band was happy to support their life-long friend and Vortex 5 was born. The boys have never looked back. The band’s setlist for this year’s benefit will include tunes from CCR, Beatles, Neil Young, the Stones, among other favourites. Night of Rock & Blues has sold out the last two years. At press time, there were only four tables left for the January 25th event at the London Music Club. For ticket availability, visit http://www.londonmusicclub.com/

LOOKIN' BACK ON BYRON BOOK

GET YOURS TODAY!

A compilation of photos and stories about the Byron Community

Available at Moonstone Path or email barb@villagerpublications.com $25 (taxes included)

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Byron Villager

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When it comes to travel, Blowes knows! Byron Neighbourhood Reunion By Ruth-Anne Calhoun

Tica #50025059

A huge thank you to the attendees of this event. Without you, it would not have happened! Thank you also to the Hermitage Club for hosting this reunion of past and present Byron Residents. A good time was had by all! This event raised $200.00 each for Sports equipment for the three schools: St. George, Byron Southwood and Byron Northview. The committee worked very hard to make Sept. 28, 2019 a very enjoyable and memorable one. Approximately 60 people attended throughout the evening. Ticket draws were pulled by various attendees for prizes from Byron Artisans. Mark Legge won a lovely painting done by Brad Boug as did Jim Calhoun. Kerry Shearer won a beautiful painting by Brenda (nee) Muir. Doug Hatch came the farthest, from B.C., Tara Robinson-Kovach was the youngest attendee and Ron Calhoun the eldest. The last three won various Gemstone

creations by yours truly. Thank you so much to Brad and Brenda for your stunning works donated for an excellent cause! Delicious food was supplied by Belmont Catering. Great group conversations with laughter and delightful squeals helped make this a fun night. Have a look at these photos taken---maybe you will see people you know! Last, but not least, thank you to the core committee: Alan Sharp, Marilyn Hutton, Sandra Davies, Phil Price and Gary Dorman. Associate members Sarah Watkins, Paul Phillips, Pete Granger and Dennis McGee also contributed immensely to a successful night of reuniting ‘Byron Home Grown Kids’ and ‘Welcome Imports’. A village, our Beloved Byron, we all make! Keep your eyes open for the next Byron Reunion coming in 2020.

Issue 47 - Jan/Feb 2020 Page 5

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Byronite Brad Boug’s Art By Barb Botten

Creating art has always been part of Brad Boug’s life. The Byron-raised retired mechanic grew up on Stephen Street and married fellow Byronite, Megan. They have two grown daughters. Brad started drawing around the age of four and credits Gord Sackville, a teacher at Byron Northview with encouraging his artistic abilities. Two of his sisters also taught him different techniques and boosted his confidence. Brad still has pencil sketches of classmates he did during math class. He continued his artistic education with five years in the Saunders Secondary art program.

His school-days nickname has also followed him through life. Friends Mat McGhee and Lenny Foran called him Seaweed because of a long, blond mane of hair. Artwork is always on his mind. At any given time, Brad has 20 or 30 ideas rolling around in his head for what he’ll make next. Like any true artist, it’s about creating and expressing himself. Many of his pieces are for sale but Brad humbly shrugs his shoulders and says, “If they like it, they like it, and some will buy it”. He says with a laugh “I just really enjoy doing it”. Since retiring from Harry’s Spring Service two years ago, Brad has had more time for his art. He says you can see in his recent works that he feels freer and happier because he’s started using more vibrant colour. Although most of his work has an abstract feel to it, the mediums change from piece to piece. He paints with oil and dry pastels, watercolours, art markers, pen and ink and has just started dabbling in digital art. Brad describes himself as a self-taught hobbyist whose techniques are always evolving. The journey from conception to completion is a mystery even to the artist. “Sometimes I just start painting without knowing what the outcome is going to be. It’s almost always a work in progress”. He rarely relies on photos when creating a landscape, preferring to depend on theatre-of-the-mind instead. Brad names his pieces and most have a backstory of inspiration. For example, one painting was motivated by the song Call Me by the English band Shine On. Part of the lyric is, ‘Call me a sinner, call me a saint’. The piece is a visual interpretation of the song. As he explains on his website, “I believe art is everywhere and in everybody. Everyone just has a different style and appreciation, which makes it a wonderful experience for everyone to take part in”. You can view Brad’s art portfolio on his Facebook page. Many pieces are also featured and for sale on The Arts Collective website, www.taclo.net .

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Byron Villager

Losing a piece of Byron’s History

It appears that a piece of Byron’s historymay have been lost forever. Dozens of neighbours of a collapsed 130-year-old Byron barn are disappointed with the city for moving so slowly on their request to have the structure designated a heritage building. They’re also upset with the property’s owner, whom they claim removed much of the red barn’s roof without a demolition permit last September. The barn’s support beams collapsed in December, leaving the building with what’s believed to be irreparable damage. More than thirty area residents applied to London’s Advisory Committee on Heritage (LACH) to have the barn declared a heritage site and save it from the wrecking ball. After applying to save a building, there’s supposed to be a 60-day review period during which the owner must request a permit if he wants to tear the building down. Heritage advocates are asked to weigh in and a decision is made whether to issue the demolition permit or declare that the building is a heritage property that must be preserved. City of London building inspectors did visit the site twice, but neighbours say it’s too little too late. Neighbours claim a stop work order was issued but dismantling of the barn continued. Another inspector visited the site and ordered that the removed boards be put back because there was no permit. Neighbours also say the collapse occurred on the day many more of the boards were removed. This situation is nothing new for Byron or London. While the preservation process ambles along, the property owner is on site, sometimes begging forgiveness rather than asking permission to do what he or she wants, regardless of the rules. The barn at 247 Halls Mill Road was built in 1890, as part of William Griffith’s woolen mill property. At that time, it was the mill’s warehouse as well as a coach house and barn. The original home was Queen Anne-styled with gingerbread trim and an open veranda. The big red barn was raised some thirty years after the Halls Mills village was renamed Byron, and neighbours hoped it would continue to stand in tribute to the area’s rich roots. The City listed the Halls Mill area among its neighbourhoods under consideration for a Heritage District Designation, and the barn an “asset” to the historical value of the area. It’s been one of the more visible structures on Halls Mill Rd., easily seen from the fire hall and the Sanitorium Rd. bridge. In their letter to the Heritage Committee, concerned neighbours described the barn as a dominant part of the Halls Mill landscape and worthy of both “architectural and historical conservancy”.

Byron residents can only speculate about what’s next as LACH is scheduled to discuss the issue on Jan 8. Letters of support for saving what’s left of the barn and the house must be submitted by 9 am Jan 13 and advocates hope for a good turnout for the public participation meeting on Jan 20. After that a decision will come from LACH on what should be done with what’s left of this unique part of Byron’s heritage.

Issue 47 - Jan/Feb 2020 Page 7

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Eyes on Byron – Keeping Our Community Safe

Brad Stokkermans saw a need in Byron. A need for all of us to come together and protect our treasured Byron community. In Brad’s words, “This year I was hit by thieves. We left a vehicle unlocked on our driveway, and the spare keys were left in the center console. This meant the thieves had keys for both vehicles and our house. We were lucky in the sense that they took the keys and some change, but did not steal the cars or enter our home. With a bill of $1000 dollars, I started reading more and more about other people in this neighbourhood experiencing the same issues. I set up a community meeting and was shocked by the exceptional turnout. This led me to reach out to the community for volunteers to help support this initiative. I am so excited to the tell you the support from the community has been more than I could ever have expected. The core group of volunteers involved in pushing this forward has been nothing short of amazing.” Eyes on Byron is a community based organization of volunteers with a focus on deterring crime in our community. Through communication and reporting strategies, we can all keep Byron safe and strong. Brad has created a website that has crime prevention tips, crime stats in this area and ways to communicate ideas and concerns in an open forum. “One of the most important things to do is report all break-ins and occurrences to the London Police.”

Byron safe. A safe community impacts the way people feel and interact in the community. There is strength in numbers, so the more people involved in this endeavour, the stronger we are. For more information or how to be a part of this growing group of concerned Byron residents, visit www.eyesonbyron.ca or Facebook at Eyes on Byron (previously Byron Neighbourhood Watch).

Josh Morgan is a regular contributor to the Hyde Park-Oakridge Villager Magazine, providing information on things that are happening in our community. Josh is currently serving his second term as Councillor for Ward 7. He resides in the Hyde Park area of Ward 7 with his wife Melanie and their three children. Josh studied at Western University where he completed a Combined Honours Degree in Economic and Political Science, and a Masters of Political Science (with a focus on Local Government). He is the Recruitment and Development Officer for Western University’s Local Government Program. If you have a question, comment or issue you would like to discuss, email or call Josh directly: Cell phone: 226-927-0395 Phone: 519-661-2500 Ext. 4007 Facebook.com/JoshMorganLDN Instagram.com/JoshMorganLDN Email: joshmorgan@london.ca Councillor’s Office at 519-661-5095 Twitter: @JoshMorganLDN The London City Police encourage all crimes be reported. No incident is considered too small to report. The benefit of reporting all occurrences is that you have a documented case and file number. This helps the police with crime statistics, mapping a neighbourhood patrol pri rities. You will also need this if you plan to file with insurance. You can file online at www.londoncitypolice. ca Go to Services tab, go to Make a Report.

Brad and the volunteers of Eyes on Byron encourage you to get involved to strengthen this cause and keep

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To advertise here please contact Barb@villagerpublications.com Hyde Park - Oakridge Villager • December 2019 • Page 9

Rhett McClenaghan 519-438-4813 Rhett@rdfinancialsolutions.ca www.rdfinancialsolutions.ca

YEAR-END CHECKLIST As the end of the year approaches, now is the time to consider your tax savings strategies. Contact us for 2018 year-end tax planning tips.

CANADIAN TAI CHI ACADEMY Introduction to Tai Chi classes

St. Anne’s Anglican Church, 1344 Commissioners Rd.W www.londontaichi.ca london@canadiantaichiacademy.org Facebook: Canadian Tai Chi Academy-London Branch Ask about our introduction classes.

Issue 47 - Jan/Feb 2020 Page 9

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CORNELL Farms Deep Roots in Byron By Ruth-Anne Calhoun

During the early to mid 1800’s several families emigrated from the U. S. A. to this area then known as Upper Canada. The Cornells made that move when Jesse Cornell (Cornwell, Cornwall) applied for and was granted 200 acres from Col. Thomas Talbot in Westminster Township. The land was lot 78 WBNTR on the North Talbot Road. At that moment, the Cornell Family became part of our Beloved Byron Family. In 1816 Jesse wed Rachel Rymal, cleared land to build a log house and raise crops. Then he hewed trees for a road way which is Colonel Talbot Road today. Jesse and Rachel’s sons, George and Harmon, lived on the family land all their lives. When George married Elizabeth Shannon, he was gifted 90 acres where, in 1883, he built a large yellow brick house that stands today. Harmon lived on Lot 78 with Jesse which he inherited in 1881. Harmon married Clement Kilbourne who bore him three sons, John, Jesse and Herbert and one daughter, Alfretta. In 1860, Harmon added a second story to their home that he made three bricks deep. John wed Clementine Blashill and remained on the farm. Jesse became a Veterinarian and moved to Michigan. His brother, Herbert, was the Grandfather of the Cornell Meat family business on Pack Road. Sister Alfretta married William Harris of Delaware and they resided in Lambeth. John and Clementine had two sons and two daughters. Stanley was born in 1887 and Basil in 1894. Upon John’s death in 1928, each son received 45 acres, Stanley on the north side and Basil the south. Stanley had been buying land on Lot 79 from the north side of Concession 2, now Southdale Road, where he began planting fruit trees. In 1918 he married Verna Sutton of Scottsville, built a house and welcomed a newborn son, Ronald in 1919. In 1939 Ronald began farming apples, pears, strawberries, raspberries, currants, cherries, plums, asparagus and rhubarb with his father. Stanley died in an auto accident in 1958. In 1946, Ronald married Betty Styles and built a house on Lot 79 across the road from his parents. Between 1949 and 1961, Ronald and Betty had three children: John, Tom, and Susan. Later they adopted a daughter Anne. Both boys worked the farm and later Tom became the manager. A market store was built in 1989 and customers were greeted by the family dog, Jesse. Fresh fruit, produce and home baked goods were sold to Byron and area residents until 1999 when a fire destroyed the market. The loss was devastating to both the Cornell and Byron area families. Tom passed away in 2003 and Ronald in 2014 just a few days shy of his 95th birthday. Basil continued to live on the farm except for a brief time he spent in Alberta. He returned in the 1930’s to plant trees and grow fruit. Both he and his brother, Stanley, had stands in the Covent Garden Market in London. Basil kept his stand there until he died in 1957. Mary and their daughter, Beulah, operated the stand until the 1970’s. Basil’s 45 acres still belongs to the family. The “three brick thick” farmhouse still stands and Beulah Cornell Frezell holds the original deed signed by both Colonel Thomas Talbot and Jesse Cornell, with affixed wax seal on the parchment document. Currently, the land is rented out for hay. Beulah’s daughter, Donna, resides on the land and operates “Golden Opportunities Assistance Dogs” which is training Golden Retrievers for disabled people’s mobility.

Thank you to the wonderful Cornell family for all their contributions to the area and to our Beloved Byron’s growth and residents! Many thanks to Beulah (Cornell) Frezell for her contribution of photos and information for this article.

The home that Beulah Cornell (Frezell) grew up in. This one was bricked in the 1800’s (it is three bricks thick) then stucco’d in the 1930s. This house is still standing. It’s located on the West side of Colonel Talbot Rd just South of Southdale. Circa 1891

Sign on Cornell Market Store on south side of Southdale just west of Colonel Talbot on Jan 1, 1991

George Cornell home built in the 1883. Pictured here sitting is George and Elizabeth Clemente Kilbourne Cornell. Standing behind his father is John Wesley and standing beside her mother is Ida. Also standing is Eliza Tunks, neighbour. The children in front are Stan, Gertrude and Mabel Cornell. Circa 1884

This is the same house George Cornell built pictured here in the 1930s.

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Byron Villager

Byron gets Outdoor Skating Rink!

Free winter skating in Byron was a long-time dream that’s now a reality. The Optimist Club of Byron’s proposal for an outdoor rink was one of the 2017 winners in the City of London’s Neighbourhood Decision Making Program. After the hard work of volunteers, the rink is finally in place at Byron’s Jorgenson Park. The ice rink kit was supplied by a Byron resident.After they learned how it was done, a group of volunteers assembled the rink on top of the tennis court in the park. Once the floor and boards were in place, it was just a matter of waiting for temperatures to drop so volunteers could start making ice. The Optimists say they’d like to expand the rink’s size in years to come if more funding becomes available. They plan to open it every winter if there are enough volunteers available to do the work. The rink will be available for skating even when the Community Centre is closed. However skating is only permitted until 10 pm under the city’s Parks and Recreation bylaw. When the Centre is open, there’s washroom access available for skaters. The Optimists recommend that young skaters wear a helmet and skate only with adult supervision. There is no outdoor lighting on the tennis courts, however there’s perimeter lighting on the Community Centre and the parking lot. Everyone is welcome to use the rink and enjoy some winter skating for free. `1Every year service clubs, groups and individuals submit hundreds of ideas to the City’s Neighbourhood Decision Making Program. Twenty projects to improve a neighbourhood are chosen to share in a $250,000 budget. The finalists are put to a

public vote on the city’s website. Tens of thousands of votes are cast to choose the winning concepts. In a statement, Mayor Ed Holder praised the NDM program. “We’ve seen Londoners of all ages get creative with the Neighbourhood Decision Making program, and we’re really looking forward to see these winning projects come to life.” Do you have an idea that would make our neighbourhood better? Visit https://getinvolved.london.ca/NDM to learn more about how the NDM process works.

A Welcoming Place to Nurture Faith and Engage Community 1344 Commissioners Road W., London N6K 1E1 | www.stannesbyron.ca 519-471-0800 St. Anne’s Anglican Church (Byron) Be a spark of hope! Join us on the journey… Sundays 8:00 a.m. Book of Common Prayer 9:30 a.m. Family Service with Choir Sunday School Childcare for Infants and Toddlers

Issue 47 - Jan/Feb 2020 Page 11

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Whats Happening in Byron January

Royal Canadian Legion Branch 533 Byron-Springbank

2020

1276 Commissioners Rd. W. Phone 519-472-3300

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Weekend Mass Schedule Saturday - 5:00 pm Sunday - 7:30am / 9:00am / 11:00am Monthly Family Movie Nights (6:30pm) (movie & snacks all for free)

Meat Draw 3:30 – 5:00 PM

Friday Specials 2-7:00 PM

Legion Hours 12 – 8 PM Levee 3 – 6 PM

Contact Jamie Hughes 519-472-1001 ByronLegion@Bell.net

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Meat Draw 3:30 – 5:00 PM Dance 8PM – 12AM Organized KAOS Meat Draw 3:30 – 5:00 PM

Senior’s Euchre 1:00 – 4:00 PM

Friday Specials 2-7:00 PM

Fun Darts 7 – 9 PM

Exec Mtg 6:30 PM LA Mtg 7:00 PM

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Senior’s Euchre 1:00 – 4:00 PM

Friday Specials 2-7:00 PM Friday Supper 5-6:30 PM

Fun Darts 7 – 9 PM

Friday January 24 The Lion King (2019 edition)

Friday February 21 Toy Story 4

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Meat Draw 3:30 – 5:00 PM Chili Cookoff Starts at 1:00PM Trivia Night with Mike Delaney 7-11 PM

Senior’s Euchre 1:00 – 4:00 PM

General Meeting 7:30 PM

Friday Specials 2-7:00 PM

Fun Darts 7 – 9 PM

Monthly Parish Breakfast (eggs, pancakes, sausage, fruit) Sunday January 19th and Sunday February 16th after the 9am and 11am Masses We have Babysitting and Sunday Friends Programs for Children ages 4-7. Check out our website for details. Everyone Is Welcome!! 1164 Commissioners Rd W. London ON N6K 1C7 www.stgeorgelondon.ca

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Senior’s Euchre 1:00 – 4:00 PM

Friday Specials 2-7:00 PM

Family Breakfast 9 – 11:30 AM

Fun Darts 7 – 9 PM

Next Sunday Breakfast 26 Jan 2020 Bacon, Eggs, Sausage, Home Fries, Pancakes, Toast, Coffee, Tea, Juice ********** $8.00 (Kids 8 and under Free) 9:00 am – 11:30 am

Daily Draft Special 20 ounce glass $4.50 All Brands 2-7 PM

Bar Hours Mon - Wed – 11:00 AM – 10:00 PM Thursday – 11:00 AM – 11:00 PM Friday – 11:00 AM – 12:00 AM Saturday – 11:00 AM – 1:00 AM Sunday - 12:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Bar may close earlier at Bartender’s Discretion ) February

Join us for Friday Specials Any large jug of draft - $13.00 2:00 – 7:00 PM

February Events Preview Dances Feb 8; Toast & Jam Feb 22: KAOS

Royal Canadian Legion Branch 533 Byron-Springbank

2020

1276 Commissioners Rd. W. Phone 519-472-3300

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For Hall Rental

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Storybook Gardens Skate Trail The 2019-2020 Storybook Gardens outdoor winter skating season is open Tuesday through Sunday, weather permitting. Our winding refrigerated 250 skating track offers beautiful outdoor skating six days a week from December through to the end of February. Take a break to enjoy a cup of hot chocolate and a fresh hot Beavertail pastry from our rink-side Beavertails location. Private site rentals are available for corporate and group functions. Skate rentals are also available. Special Holiday hours are in effect from December 21 2019 to January 4 2020. Open daily from 10:00am to 8:00pm, except: Dec 24, Dec 26, Dec 31 and Jan 1 10:00am to 4:00pm. and Dec 25 – Closed Planning to be open starting Dec 7, 2019 Snowybook Village is open December 21-January 4th. Program includes; Extra skating hours, holiday lighting and mascot meet and greets. Come be part of the magic this holiday season! Storybook Gardens For more information on any of these events at Storybook – visit www.Storybook.london.ca

Meat Draw 3:30 – 5:00 PM

Contact Jamie Hughes 519-472-1001 ByronLegion@Bell.net

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Meat Draw 3:30 – 5:00 PM Valentine Dance

Senior’s Euchre 1:00 – 4:00 PM

Friday Specials 2-7:00 PM

Fun Darts 7 – 9 PM

LA Mtg 7:00 PM

8PM – 12AM Toast & Jam

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Meat Draw 3:30 – 5:00 PM

Senior’s Euchre 1:00 – 4:00 PM

Friday Specials 2-7:00 PM

Fun Darts 7 – 9 PM

Exec Mtg 6:30 PM

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Meat Draw 3:30 – 5:00 PM Dance 8PM – 12AM Organized KAOS

Senior’s Euchre 1:00 – 4:00 PM

Friday Specials 2-7:00 PM Friday Supper 5 – 6:30 PM

Fun Darts 7 – 9 PM

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Meat Draw 3:30 – 5:00 PM Trivia Night with Mike Delaney 7-11 PM

Senior’s Euchre 1:00 – 4:00 PM

Friday Specials 2-7:00 PM

Family Breakfast 9 – 11:30 AM

Fun Darts 7 – 9 PM

Next Sunday Breakfast 23 Feb 2020 Bacon, Eggs, Sausage, Home Fries, Pancakes, Toast, Coffee, Tea, Juice ********** $8.00 (Kids 8 and under Free) 9:00 am – 11:30 am

Daily Draft Special 20 ounce glass $4.50 All Brands 2-7 PM

Bar Hours Mon - Wed – 11:00 AM – 10:00 PM Thursday – 11:00 AM – 11:00 PM Friday – 11:00 AM – 12:00 AM Saturday – 11:00 AM – 1:00 AM Sunday - 12:00 PM – 7:00 PM (Bar may close earlier at Bartender’s Discretion )

Join us for Friday Specials Any large jug of draft - $13.00 2:00 – 7:00 PM

February Events Preview Mar 14 Paddyrama March 28 Toast & Jam

Page 12

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Byron Villager

The Royal Canadian Poppy Campaign for 2019 is over and again was very successful. Through the generosity donations of residents and businesses of London West, Branch 533, Byron-Springbank Legion was able to collect just under $43,000 for our Poppy Fund. These donations stay in our community. As an example, at our General Meeting, on 27 Nov, the Branch presented a cheque for $23,800 to Sue Hardy of St. Joseph’s Health Care Foundation, Veteran’s Care. These funds will go to purchasing a Bed Power Lift and 7 ergonomic mattresses for Veterans living in Parkwood Hospital. 2019 Royal Canadian Legion Poppy Campaign

To show our appreciation to the Branch Poppy Chair, our Branch President, John Morris, presented Michael Beatty with his Legion Poppy Chair Medal. Once again, our Veterans and the Byron-Springbank Legion, Branch 533, would like to thank the residents and businesses of west London for their generosity and support.

Michael Beatty (Branch Poppy Chair), Sue Hardy (STJHC Foundation), John Morris (Branch President) The Poppy Campaign is only as successful as the Branch’s Volunteers that distribute Poppy Boxes to the businesses in London West and who man the Poppy Tables at Costco and Cherryhill Village Mall. Also, the 27 City of London Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron provided help in assembling 800 Poppy boxes. assembling the Poppy Boxes. At our November General Meeting, we also showed our appreciation to two young volunteers who put in a lot of work for the Campaign.

James Beatty, over three Poppy campaigns, has volunteered almost 100 hours, assisting his Dad, Michael Beatty (Branch Poppy Chair) to assemble Poppy Boxes, open boxes, count money, recycle boxes, and deposit donations. Both Tyler and James were presented Certificates of Appreciation for all the work they have put in to help our Veterans.

Tyler Brookes, again this year, helped his Grandmother Marilyn to man four Poppy table shifts at Costco and Cherryhill.

Issue 47 - Jan/Feb 2020 Page 13

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Our Trivia Night would not be a success without the continuing support of our players. Many teams return year-after-year including some who have attended all 15 trivia nights. We are also thankful for our many generous sponsors and advertisers who contribute to the success of the event. If you are interested in participating in our 2020 Trivia Night scheduled for Saturday, February 1st, you can put your name on the waiting list for a table by sending an email to trivia@ oakridgeoptimists.ca.

The first Saturday night in February has been Trivia Night for the past 15 years for hundreds of people from Oakridge and across the city. The Oakridge Optimist Club held its 15th annual Trivia Night on February 2nd at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel where 520 players enjoyed dinner then put their brains to work trying to answer the 100 trivia questions. Optimist Jim Easton faced some skepticism when he initially brought forward his idea for a trivia night to the club’s board of directors in 2004. Jim believed it would offset a decline in revenue from bingos which were the club’s main source of fundraising. He pressed on and Oakridge Optimist members got on board to make the first Trivia Night on February 5th, 2005 a success. The event grew in size and popularity over the years and quickly replaced bingos as the club’s major source of revenue. The 15 Trivia Nights have raised a total of more than $350,000 to support many youth-related activities over the years. Each trivia night requires many hours of organization and preparation by our Optimist club members. More than 50 volunteers are required to make the evening run smoothly. Optimist Jim who has prepared the trivia questions from the beginning serves as quiz master for the night. We sometimes receive feedback that the questions are too difficult. To mark Optimist Jim Easton serves as M-C and quiz master for the Oakridge Optimist Trivia Night.

One of the 65 trivia teams participating in the 2019 Trivia Night on February 2nd.

The Oakridge Optimist Club is made up men and women who volunteer to work with community partners to bring programs and support to youth in the areas of health, recreation, safety and education. For more information on the club, visit our website at www.oakridgeoptimists.ca. Aerial shot of Storybook Gardens circa 1970s

Have you had changes in memory? Are you feeling forgetful?

Judith Colbert, 1975 4 A re you 60 years or older? 4 Do you have trouble remembering things? 4 Do not have Alzheimer’s Disease? Dr. Montero-Odasso invites you to take part in a physical exercise study that may help to improve your memory and mobility. For more information, contact (519) 685 4292 ext. 42179 When you call in, you will be asked questions about your memory and general health. If eligible, you will be invited to visit the Gait & Brain Lab at Parkwood Institute, 550 Wellington Road South, London, Ontario.

Principal Investigator: Dr. Montero-Odasso, Geriatric Medicine GaitAndBrain.com

Page 4 Hyde Park - Oakridge Villager • March 2019 To advertise here, please contact Barb@VillagerPublications.com

Employee of the Month November

MAKE 2020 THE BEST YEAR YET! ALL AGES. ALL GRADES. ALL SUBJECTS. NOW ENROLLING!

Nowadays excellent customer service is considered as the biggest merit that a company can earn. It is the attribute that people value more than good price of a product or even more than its quality. Byron Pizza has always exceeded in customer service and now we’d like to recognize these valuable employees.

Keegan Bechard

oxfordlearning.com Byron 226.270.3069

Page 14 Byron Villager

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Dear Neighbours, London City Council is facing an unprecedented budget decision as we move into the 2020-2023 Multi-year Budget. The reality of the provincial government’s decision to reduce expenditures

As a Candidate for Ward 9 in t will be a number of conversati constituents.

means that London has been notified of $6 million in downloaded costs. To date we’ve also heard about ambulance service, transit service and conservation authorities receiving less money for vital services to name just a few. That means hard decisions for local tax levies. I’m not looking forward to this budget decision. How are we going to maintain services that Londoners need? Do we postpone needed infrastructure repairs? What happens when a homeowner decides to wait on fixing the roof? We may be able to do that for the short term, but eventually the cost will be greater than if we had done the projects when we needed to do them. If you want Council to hold the line on tax increases, Londoners must be willing to give up services. It’s that simple. Below are two questions which I’m asking residents to give me some feedback on. Which service(s) do

As a Candidate for Ward 9 in this year’s Municipal Election will be a number of conversations that I will be talking about constituent .

you think we need to increase or improve? The second is which service(s) are you willing to give up? Please answer both questions, either by submitting your responses online at www.annahopkins.ca or contacting me at ahopkins@london.ca or 226-927-0439. My website has links to the City’s dedicated budget pages and information on services offered to residents. Looking forward to hearing your thoughts and comments and welcome to 2020!

Talbot Village – Raleigh Concerns Thursday, March 5th from 7 to 8:30pm

Byron Northview Sidewalk Plan Community Drop-In meeting Thursday, February 20th from 6:30 to 8:30pm Byron Public Library Meeting Room (Community Room) Hosted by Anna Hopkins, Councillor for Ward 9

Bostwick Community Ctre 501 Southdale Rd. West Multi Purpose Room #1

WE ARE HIRING

Supervisors, Assistants, and Supply Educators for Programs at Byron Northview, Byron Southwood, and Byron Somerset

Are you a person who would like to: · be a part of an organization with demonstrated global impact · make a difference in the lives of others, both locally and globally Are you a person who would like to: • be a part of an organization with demonstrated global impact • make a difference in the lives of others, both locally and globally • spend time with a fun group of women and men • learn from interesting speakers Then come and see what the Rotary Club of London-Lambeth is all about. We meet twice a month, on the second and fourth Tuesday at the Village Pantry Restaurant on Main Street in Lambeth. Email Bob Boyce or Jan Polgar at lambeth.rotaryclub@gmail.com. Contact us today! · spend time with a fun group of women and men · learn from interesting speakers

BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS (OPERATING FROM 7:30 AM UNTIL SCHOOL START AND SCHOOL DISMISSAL UNTIL 6:00 PM) FOR AGES 4-12 IN OVER 65 ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS IN LONDON AND MIDDLESEX COUNTY

Then come and see what the Rotary Club of London-Lambeth is all about. We meet twice a month, on the second and fourth Tuesday at the Village Pantry Restaurant on Main Street in Lambeth. Email Bob Boyce or Jan Polgar at lambeth.rotaryclub@gmail.com. Contact us today!

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Creative work environments A competitive rate of pay

Professional Learning within a supportive network A Monday through Friday schedule

Apply online today!

PART-TIME AND SUPPLY POSITIONS AVAILABLE

lcc.on.ca/work-part-time-byron

Issue 47 - Jan/Feb 2020 Page 15

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J&A Arbory and Lawn Care

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