Lake Travis - Westlake Edition | March 2020

LAKE TRAVIS WESTLAKE EDITION

VOLUME 11, ISSUE 3  MARCH 13APRIL 16, 2020

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HELP WANTED As stang diculties continue for business owners in the Lake Travis area trying to ll hourly positions, job postings are increasing. One example is shown in the Facebook group Bee Cave Worker Bees, which on Feb. 19 tallied 64 dierent job listings . FILLING THE NEED Lake Travis Chamber of Commerce received an employment report from Workforce Solutions that covers all of 2018. Each job was posted through Workforce Solutions.

Following multiple infrastructure evaluations, much deliberation and previous delays, a $22 million capital improvements bond will appear on the ballot for West Lake Hills residents May 2. Since its incorpo- ration in 1953, the city has never gone out for a bond, and according to Mayor Linda Anthony, the decision was four years in the making. The bond is centered on the city’s major infrastruc- ture needs and encompasses a proposition for a new City Hall and police building as well as a proposition devoted to drainage and pavement projects. Various CONTINUED ON 56 Westlake-area cities work on infrastructure BY AMY RAE DADAMO West Lake Hills ocials voted to include a $22 million capital improvements bond on the May ballot, and Rollingwood is examining its critical infrastructure needs starting with several drainage projects. A Tale of Two Cities

514 JOBS 12 JOBS

POSTED

FILLED

ROLLINGWOOD:

Hourly employee stang issues continue SOURCES: WORK IN TEXAS, WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS, WORKER BEES FACEBOOK GROUPCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Capital improvements estimated at $19.72million

Funding not determined

During a late January luncheon at the Sonesta Bee Cave Austin Hotel hosted by the Bee Cave Chamber of Commerce, local childrens’ gym man- ager Dory Kelley made a presentation to several area business owners and professionals. “We struggle with lack of applications, high Local leaders identify lack of aordable housing as key factor BY BRIAN RASH

turnover of employees and a lack of reliable work- ers,” Kelley said. “From our research this aects the service and retail industries the most.” Long lines, cold food, high turnover and slow service are all symptoms felt by communities experiencing stang problems, Kelley said. As one example, she talked about the now closed restau- rant in Bee Cave called Wild Kitchen and Bar. Before it nally closed in August, Wild went through four chefs and had little to no kitchen help

WEST LAKE HILLS:

Capital improvements estimated at $22 million

Funded by a potential bond

CONTINUED ON 54

SOURCES: CITY OF WEST LAKE HILLS, CITY OF ROLLINGWOOD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

PART 1 OF A TWOPART REPORT ON HOURLY EMPLOYMENT ISSUES IN THE LAKE TRAVIS AREA

Bee Cave council preps for new police building

2020 Camp GUIDE

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