Dickerson Oxton - February 2020

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FEB. 2020

ANIMAL BITES

CAR ACCIDENTS

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE

Learning to Recover

BICYCLE/ MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENTS

WHAT MY ACCIDENT TAUGHT ME

Last summer, I got into a car accident. Honestly, the situation could have been a lot worse, but it still left me with a prolonged injury. For a long time, I was hesitant to even bring it up, especially considering the serious health challenges many of our clients face. But with some time to reflect on the recovery process, I can at least say I’ve learned a lot from the experience. Most importantly, I learned how to say “no.” I’m one of those people who’s used to keeping a dozen plates spinning at once, especially as a mother. Our kids are at that age where they get invited to plenty of activities, and Tom and I strive to get them involved as much as possible. But chronic pain isn’t exactly something you can schedule around, so I had to accept that sometimes, I really couldn’t do it all.

not being able to keep up with my kids — these things weighed on me day in and day out. At times the sheer frustration with my situation would eat away at me. That’s why I’m glad I’ve had so much support through this process. whole process. He was fantastic: working late nights and watching the kids as I went through physical therapy. Even my eldest daughter pitched in to lend a hand where she could. I couldn’t have gotten through this as well as I have without their support, even if it meant swallowing my pride and allowing myself to be cared for. This is something I’ve seen many clients struggle with and I completely empathize. No matter how much an As much as it pains me to say it, I relied on Tom so much through this

BRAIN & SPINAL CORD INJURIES

realizing that sometimes you need to care for yourself so you can then do the same for others. “Self-care” has become a bit of a buzzword, but in regards to rehabilitation, it’s a valuable concept to hold onto. Making those physical therapy appointments, getting rest, setting aside time for yourself — these sorts of acts are important to your recovery. Two things that helped me were keeping a journal and finding a neurologist I trusted. Journaling made it possible to slow down and parse out my day, helping me notice the progress I was making in the healing process. Having a care professional I had faith in made my appointments that much less stressful. So, while I won’t go as far as saying I’m grateful for being rear-ended, I’m glad I was at least able to gain some perspective on this experience. If you’re facing a similar struggle, be kind to yourself. You don’t have to grit your teeth and try to go on as if nothing ever happened. Perfection

BURN INJURIES

CONSTRUCTION INJURIES

NURSING HOME ABUSE

SLIP & FALL ACCIDENTS

"This is what so many people who've neverexperienced a chronic injury can fail to understand: The pain seepsinto every aspect of your life."

BOATING ACCIDENTS

This is what so many people who’ve never experienced a chronic injury fail to understand: The pain seeps into every aspect of your life. It’s one thing to know this philosophically, as most personal injury lawyers do, but another thing entirely to experience it yourself. Wincing my way through meetings, struggling to sleep at night,

injury might be holding you back, you still want to be a superhero for your family. As strange as it may sound, just learning to take a step back and focus on your own well-being can be a monumental task. No one wants to feel like a burden or they can’t help the people they care about. But the key to actually getting better is

isn’t everything. Give yourself time to heal, and please reach out if you need support. –Chelsea Dickerson

TRUCK ACCIDENTS

PHARMACEUTICAL & DRUG INJURIES

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