Generations_Roadmap

GENERATIONS – Journal of the American Society on Aging

A Roadmap Toward Safer, Happier Lives: The National Collaboratory to Address Elder Mistreatment By Kristin Lees Haggerty, Rebecca Jackson Stoeckle, and Terry Fulmer The safety and welfare of elders must be prioritized to ensure they live free from harm. T he National Collaboratory to Address Elder Mistreatment is a group of elder mistreat- ment (Acierno et al., 2010), and not nearly enough is being done to stop it. Elder mistreatment includes any “knowing,

ment experts, innovators, researchers, and clini- cians who are working together to design and test a scalable care model for addressing elder mis- treatment in hospital emergency departments. At a recent convening hosted by The Collab- oratory, the thirty participants took part in an ice-breaking activity in which they were asked to introduce themselves and describe an older adult who is important to them. Participants described grandparents, neighbors, and friends who in­ spire them with strength, wisdom, and energy. They described older adults who work hard, care for their adult children and grandchildren, and pass on important values and culture. Taking a moment to recognize the enormous influence older adults have on our lives and the incredible value they bring to our families, com- munities, and the wider society makes it easy to understand why it is important to work to ensure older adults’ right to live free from harm and to prioritize their safety. Yet, one in ten older adults in the United States are victims of elder mistreat­

intentional, or negligent act by a caregiver or any other person that causes harm or a serious risk of harm to a vulnerable adult” (National Center on Elder Abuse [NCEA], 2019). Types of mistreat- ment include physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, neglect, exploitation, and self-neglect (NCEA, 2019). Elder mistreatment costs billions of dollars in healthcare expenditures annually (Dong, 2005), and has devastating consequences for older adults’ physical, emotional, and social health (Dong, 2015; Gibbs and Mosqueda, 2014). Rapid increases in the older adult population, coupled with changing and complicated net- works of providers and caregivers, necessitate improved resources, tools, and education for pre- venting and addressing elder mistreatment. Inside this Issue of Generations This Spring 2020 issue of Generations focuses on how to take immediate action to prevent,

abstract This article introduces the contents of the Spring 2020 issue of Generations , which tackles how to prevent, intervene, and ultimately eradicate elder mistreatment. It describes how the publication was envisioned and mentions initiatives working to end elder mistreatment. | key words : elder mistreat­ ment, elder abuse, emergency departments, the National Collaboratory to Address Elder Mistreatment, Age- Friendly Health Systems initiative, Adult Protective Services, Geriatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network

Copyright © 2020 American Society on Aging; all rights reserved. This article may not be duplicated, reprinted or distributed in any formwithout written permission from the publisher: American Society on Aging, 575Market St., Suite 2100, San Francisco, CA 94105-2869; e-mail: info@asaging.org . For information about ASA’s publications visit www.asaging.org/publications . For information about ASA membership visit www.asaging.org/join.

8 | Spring 2020

Taking Action Against Elder Mistreatment

intervene, and ultimately eradicate elder mis- treatment. It provides a roadmap for clinicians and care providers, and includes tools and strategies for overcoming pressing challenges for addressing elder mistreatment in diverse settings. Foregrounding this issue is The Col- laboratory’s new model for screening and re­ sponding to mistreatment in the emergency department setting. The issue’s content is bookended with wide- lens perspectives addressing elder mistreatment, beginning with pieces that present strategies for reframing public perceptions of aging and mis- treatment and the pressing need to prioritize cultural context as research, policy, and practice advance. The issue closes out with updates on federal efforts and priorities, elder justice pro- motion at the national and state levels, and keen insights on accessing funding. In between, the issue uses a narrower lens, turning frst to innovative health systems–based strategies for mitigating elder mistreatment, including the Age-Friendly Health Systems ini- tiative, the National Collaboratory to Address Elder Mistreatment, and the Geriatric Emer- gency Care Applied Research Network. Next, issue content traces a path through the various health- and community-based settings that pres- ent opportunities for identifcation and response, zeroing in on specifc tools and strategies involv- ing frst responders, emergency departments, Adult Protective Services, legal aid, housing, and

rural and remote populations in efforts to iden- tify and respond to elder mistreatment. Interwoven throughout this issue of Gener- ations are program spots illustrating the prom- inent themes in the articles, such as a case example of two older adults’ journey to safety in the face of homelessness; the National Cen- ter on Elder Abuse’s strategies for promoting an evidence-based communication strategy; and ElderAbuse.org’s mission to eradicate elder abuse through policy, research, and public advocacy. Collectively, the articles presented herein highlight the emergence and spread of effective approaches to addressing elder mistreatment, convey the importance of early support from foundations and federal agencies to promote inno- vation and dissemination, and show the promise of collaboration across sectors and disciplines. Importantly, there remains a clear need for more research, intervention design and testing, and, especially, funding to continue this promis- ing trajectory of growth and improvement in the feld of elder mistreatment. Kristin Lees Haggerty, Ph.D., is project director for the National Collaboratory to Address Elder Mistreat­ ment at the Education Development Center (EDC) in Waltham, Massachusetts. Rebecca Jackson Stoeckle is a vice president and director of Private Sector Partnerships at the EDC. Terry Fulmer, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., is president of The John A. Hartford Foundation in New York City.

References Acierno, R., et al. 2010. “Prevalence and Correlates of Emotional, Phys- ical, Sexual, and Financial Abuse and Potential Neglect in the United States: The National Elder Mis- treatment Study.” American Jour- nal of Public Health 100(2): 292–7. Dong, X. 2005. “Medical Implica- tions of Elder Abuse and Neglect.” Clinics in Geriatric Medicine 21(2): 293–313.

Dong, X. Q. 2015. “Elder Abuse: Systematic Review and Implica- tions for Practice.” Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 63(6): 1214–38. Gibbs, L. M., and Mosqueda, L. 2014. “Medical Implications of Elder Abuse and Neglect.” Clinics in Geriatric Medicine 30(4): xv–xvi.

National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA). 2019. “Frequently Asked Questions.” Washington, DC: Administration for Community Living. ncea.acl.gov/FAQ.aspx. Retrieved July 20, 2019.

Copyright © 2020 American Society on Aging; all rights reserved. This article may not be duplicated, reprinted or distributed in any formwithout written permission from the publisher: American Society on Aging, 575Market St., Suite 2100, San Francisco, CA 94105-2869; e-mail: info@asaging.org . For information about ASA’s publications visit www.asaging.org/publications . For information about ASA membership visit www.asaging.org/join.

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