CLAS 2021 DEI Annual Report

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College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

2021 DEI ANNUAL REPORT

WELCOME

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On behalf of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences committee on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, I am pleased to share the 2021 CLAS DEI Annual Report. As part of our ongoing work, the DEI Committee prepares an annual report to document the state of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the College. In the interest of transparency and accountability, the role of the CLAS DEI Committee is part of the MOPP (Manual of Policies and Procedures), which calls for an annual report to be written and distributed to the CLAS community. This year, we finalized our CLAS Strategic Plan with the goal of having DEI not be merely a section in the plan, but also a thread that runs through all aspects of our College’s educational, research, and engagement infrastructure. Annually, the DEI Committee will develop a plan which will document how we will work to address the strategic priorities of the College and build systems that ensure equity and inclusion for all students, faculty, and staff, fostering an environment in which all can thrive.

Sara Sanders Professor

Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Director of DEI

As we work toward meaningful change to uplift all members in our CLAS community, we must reflect on the College’s identity. CLAS is home to a wide range of disciplines and a vast array

of individuals with unique stories. At our core, artistic creativity, scientific inquiry, and innovative teaching help our students grow as global citizens and professionals—and we recognize that our faculty and staff have the tremendous responsibility and privilege of guiding future generations and shaping their field of study. This is true not only of the scientific, professional, and artistic skills and concepts that we teach, but also in the values we model and the principles to which we commit ourselves. As we continue our work in DEI, we strive to live our values of appreciation and respect for individuals by listening to each other’s stories and fostering the growth of each person we encounter. We grow by learning from the experiences of others and challenging our own world views. This critical inquiry is at the heart of a liberal arts education. This report shares some of those individual stories and experiences. And, we view it as equally important that the report tells our story with data, sharing the progress CLAS has made on key equity metrics which we are working to improve over time. Through the efforts of the CLAS DEI Committee, we have taken meaningful action to address policies, procedures, and practices that lead to inequities. For example, we implemented and institutionalized the Path to Distinction program in the College, which helps search committees be mindful about, and respond to, implicit bias in faculty searches. We also have provided departments with tools for developing their own DEI action plans and considering how they can implement systemic changes to build more inclusive departments. In 2020-2021, CLAS faculty, students, and staff grappled with critical questions about race and justice—and invited the community to join us—in our theme-year public conversation series, “Pursuing Racial Justice at Iowa.”

Of course, we have ongoing challenges in the College and many opportunities to improve—one critical goal being to hire a full-time DEI Director, a leadership role that I view as imperative for our future success.

Thank you for your continued partnership with the College in addressing the complex issues facing not only this institution but society. We must lead with our values to create the society in which we want to live. We must lead by bringing people together, seeking to understand difference, and building synergies that recognize our interconnectedness and that are powered by our diverse lived experiences. And we must lead as people who are not bystanders of hate but instead allies of unity. We—the faculty, staff, and students of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences—are the most essential element in building the college community that we want for all. We appreciate your continued investment and presence in this process.

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CONTENTS

6 Message from UI leadership

8 DEI Action

Plan Update

10 2021 DEI

Actions and Initiatives

12 Faculty Diversity

16 Staff Diversity

18 Student Diversity While we strive to present accurate data, variations in the ways data are collected, recorded, and labeled may create slight discrepancies. We will make our source data available upon request and welcome any questions or feedback.

24 Interview with Dayanna "Day" Martinez-Soto

28 Roundtable

Discussion at Wild Bill's with CLAS Faculty and Staff

34 2021 Diversity Catalyst Awards

36 Credits

A MESSAGE FROM

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UI LEADERSHIP

It has been great to be back on campus! While being vigilant in our effort to battle the ongoing pandemic, nothing replaces our students, faculty, and staff being together at the University of Iowa. The past year’s events have shown the importance of our work and continuing our momentum to build a diverse, equitable, and inclusive campus experience. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences continues to lead this effort, and I applaud the creative, successful, and ongoing initiatives. Fantastic work is happening for the new university strategic plan to embed DEI into our institution. As the process continues this spring, we are giving careful attention to the alignment of the university with our colleges’ strategic plans. You will see an effort focused on our values, accountability, education, recruitment, retention, mentorship, recognition, and well-being of our students, faculty, and staff to build a new future for the University of Iowa. You will see similarities in the institution’s effort and the new CLAS Strategic Plan to promote an inclusive environment and build stronger infrastructure to support our DEI efforts across our campus – and this is by design. While a plan is the vital backbone of our efforts, it comes to life through the people committed to living it. There has been a collective effort to continue the safe and challenging discussions across our institution, allowing everyone to grow. We must continue to build positive respect for each other every day by listening to learn rather than reacting. It is crucial we retain our current Hawkeyes while we work to recruit an inclusive student, faculty, and staff community. Having many different opinions, cultures, and diverse thoughts is our path forward to prepare the next generation of leaders. Our efforts will focus on building authentic relationships with each other, growing our community to support an inclusive population, and providing paths to leadership distinction. We focus on unity, but what does this mean? It means each of us embraces our differences of opinion. It means we seek out and listen to others. As we embrace our differences, we grow in our understanding and respect for each other. Our mutual care for each other brings us closer together as teachers, colleagues, and students of our campus. Our results will be more substantial and impactful to achieve our shared mission of education and research. I encourage you to lend your voice at the departmental, collegiate, and university levels. The Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion is here to support you and the Hawkeye community. Liz Tovar, PhD Executive Officer, Associate Vice President Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion , The University of Iowa

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DEI action plan UPDATE The CLAS DEI Committee, led by Dean Sara Sanders, is developing an update to our initial CLAS DEI Action Plan (created last year) outlining ongoing actions, adjustments, and opportunities we are pursuing to foster a more inclusive environment for all members of our college community. The DEI Action Plan is a living document and sets our intention for the coming year, building upon and recognizing the extraordinary DEI work of CLAS faculty, staff, and students as well as acknowledging the challenges we face. As we look ahead to the 2022-2023 academic year, we anticipate sharing new updates to the DEI Action Plan in Spring 2022, and you will be able to find it on the CLAS DEI website. We’ve highlighted some of our action steps and initiatives launched in CLAS during the first year of our DEI Action Plan on page 10. With sustained partnership and support from our fellow CLAS faculty, staff, and students, we continue to work together toward the goals we set with the initial DEI Action Plan. Summary of Goals

Climate and Retention • Provide mechanisms to enhance, create, or inform policies and procedures related to DEI challenges in the College • Provide feedback mechanisms to respond to DEI issues in the College • Assess and strengthen Diversity and Inclusion (DI) general education (GE CLAS Core) requirement CLAS Community Support • Enhance educational opportunities for the college community to increase awareness, knowledge, and skill development about DEI • Strengthen departmental and unit infrastructure on DEI • Leverage resources to enhance faculty, staff, and departmental DEI engagement

• Raise awareness and increase availability of learning opportunities • Develop opportunities to amplify voices and experiences of faculty, students, and staff at the University of Iowa

To accomplish our vision of a genuinely diverse, equitable, and inclusive College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, together we must:

• Reflect and build upon past successes and challenges • Strengthen partnerships with key constituencies on campus including centers, councils, programs, departments, and student groups • Tackle difficult questions and craft equitable solutions • Commit ourselves to the work of addressing policies, procedures, and practices that lead to inequities • Prioritize the needs of our students, faculty, and staff in their own development and growth MORE ABOUT CLAS DEI 9

WHERE WE ARE 2021 DEI Actions and Initiatives

Departmental DEI Action Plans

Art and Art History The Institute of Excellence and Impact in the Visual Arts Interdisciplinary collaboration with University of Iowa Stanley Museum of Art, the Iowa Writers Workshop, Obermann Center for Advanced Studies, and the University of Iowa Center for the Book, expanding opportunities for First Generation, BIPOC, and URM students through a visiting artist and scholar program and a summer residency /mentorship program. Geographical and Sustainability Sciences and Sociology / Criminology Advancing Environmental Justice at Iowa Two-year project including a series of seminars and expansion of curricular offerings exploring environmental injustices and interrogating their root causes, to advance the goal of creating an interdisciplinary certificate in Environmental Justice. Political Science and Sociology / Criminology Supporting Under-Represented Minority CLAS Undergraduates: Law School and Research Opportunities Interdisciplinary initiative to encourage URM students to apply to law school and prepare them for what to expect in law school; as well as expanding research opportunities for social science majors, with an emphasis on URM students.

• By the end of this year, all CLAS departments will create their own DEI workplans in alignment with the CLAS DEI Action Plan, integrating shared DEI goals into their departmental strategic plans and reporting on them annually. • The Dean’s Office has assessed each department’s strategic plan and will give guidance to help departments make their workplans actionable, sustainable, and comprehensive. • The College anticipates ongoing assessment of progress, and improvement of campus climate, as each department implements its plan in concert with the College’s plan. Departmental DEI Projects Funded The College granted strategic initiative funding to support the following departmental and interdepartmental DEI enhancement initiatives this year: African American Studies; Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies; and History Civil Rights and Racial Justice A new pilot program for Civil Rights education and community-engaged learning for University of Iowa undergraduate and graduate students, centering on the role and experiences of African American women in the Civil Rights movement.

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Pursuing Racial Justice Theme Year

Social Work Increasing BIPOC Student Inclusion and Belonging in the School of Social Work through Anti-Racist and Trauma-Informed Strategies Initiative to develop new content and an enhanced process for faculty, staff, and students to support the educational development and cultural competence of each other, with an emphasis on BIPOC student inclusion and the intent to share these new resources for use by other CLAS departments. World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures Supporting Undergraduate Education in Translation Effort to create a new BA in Translation, the first of its kind and only the second such bachelors’ degree in the US, which will emphasize community outreach experiences and engagement with area high schools that enroll significant heritage speaker populations (students who learned a language other than English at home).

• In our “Pursuing Racial Justice” theme-year initiative, we grappled with critical questions about race and justice, through interdisciplinary lenses. • We considered how the UI’s history as a predominantly white institution has shaped the university and CLAS; the knowledge we produce and convey to students; the interactions among our community members; and the relationship of the university to Iowa City and the state of Iowa. • We welcomed more than 500 faculty, staff, students, and community members to fourteen virtual sessions throughout the academic year, featuring our own scholars as well as experts from outside of our campus. • Videos of these sessions are available at https://bit.ly/RacialJustice_CLAS .

Supporting Departmental DEI Committees

• The CLAS DEI Committee is currently evaluating resources for education, training, and best practices for departmental DEI committees to ensure the College provides optimal support to departmental committees. • Independently, departmental DEI committees have reported pursuing training on topics including implicit bias, gender bias, bystander intervention, intersectionality, inclusive teaching, mentoring, cultural competence / proficiency, and anti-racist work climates.

Student DEI Advisory Committee

• In Spring 2021, CLAS created a standing Student DEI Advisory Committee to collaborate with the College and its DEI Committee, keeping us informed of barriers to student success. • In Fall 2021, the Student DEI Advisory Committee was expanded from 11 to 15 student members, nominated by DEOs. (Students are listed on the back page of this report.)

SEAChange

• The College is joining SEA Change, a national initiative of the American Association for the Advancement of Science to effect sustainable change with regard to diversity, equity, and inclusion in STEMM at U.S. institutions of higher education.

EquityAudits

• The CLAS DEI Committee is working with the University of Iowa Human Resources team to pilot a process for UI-wide equity audits. • CLAS has volunteered to be the first college to undergo this benchmarking process. • The process is expected to begin in Spring 2022. Path to Distinction • CLAS implemented the evidence-based Path to Distinction process to enhance faculty searches and reduce implicit bias in hiring practices. • Path to Distinction processes are now standard procedure for faculty hiring college-wide. • The College is working on a plan to also implement Path to Distinction processes for staff hiring. • The Dean’s Office is working with UI Human Resources to establish a system for measuring and tracking our improvement over time.

TATraining

• Training for graduate students who teach general education classes in Diversity and Inclusion remains a priority, though the realities of the ongoing COVID pandemic have delayed implementation. • The Dean’s Office and DEI Committee will be working with the associate deans for undergraduate education and graduate education to assess how best to support faculty and teaching assistants in these courses.

Governance Committees

• The Dean’s Office has conducted a review of our college’s leadership and governance committees to evaluate the current state of representation by race and gender in these areas. • The CLAS DEI Committee is discussing strategy to build diversity and representation on committees college-wide, including language to encourage underrepresented faculty and staff to self-nominate.

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FACULTY DIVERSITY

The following graphs compare the 2020-2021 and 2021-2022 reported demographic data for race/ethnicity and gender.

Increasing faculty diversity is one of the College’s most significant DEI goals and is critical to fostering the community defined in our mission. This goal is enmeshed with our goals to recruit and retain diverse students, too, because we know how much it matters for students to learn from instructors with whom they can identify. To promote growth in this area, CLAS has standardized the use of the Path to Distinction program in recruitment efforts, which supports hiring committees in addressing implicit bias during the hiring process. The College has also increased its use of exit interviews to build awareness of challenges surrounding retention and inform our actions and interventions in the future.

In the last year, the gender balance in the College has moved to be slightly more male dominated at 51.7%. Overall, the gender balance is fairly close and favorable given the size of the College’s faculty. The CLAS DEI Committee would like to note that the gender data has been collected and reported as binary. While we don’t view gender as binary, our data is binary at this time.

CLAS Faculty by Gender 2-Year Scope, by Academic Year

Male Female

Tenure, Clinical, and Instructional Track

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

450

382 48.2%

2021

410 51.7%

393 50.4% 386

49.5%

2020

Source: University Human Resources Information Systems, December 2021

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Last year, we set a goal to increase underrepresented minority (URM) faculty by 5% over the next five years. When we set this goal, we knew it would be a high bar to reach—and that it will likely take the whole five years to get there. While the numbers have fluctuated in a number of identity categories, it is worth noting the increase of 6 FTE Black/African American faculty members as a significant step forward in diversifying the College’s faculty. While our faculty diversity is still far from where we would like it to be, the College’s work with Path to Distinction and intentional use of exit interviews are steps in the right direction to increase our diversity over time.

The CLAS DEI Committee will continue to engage in conversations regarding how to increase faculty diversity and seek creative solutions to become more diverse, equitable, and inclusive. We encourage departments to do the same when they reflect on hiring and retention practices, as all members of the college must engage in this work for us to see real change at the college level.

URM* Faculty Total** *American Indian/Alaska Native, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latinx **Total includes all represented groups

CLAS Faculty by Reported URM Status, 2020 and 2021

Tenure, Clinical, and Instructional Track

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

800

900

1000

792 Total

2021

74 9.3%

779 Total

72 9.2%

2020

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CLAS FACULTY BY REPORTED RACIAL/ETHNIC STATUS 2020 – 2021 Tenure and Instructional Track

American Indian or Alaska Native Two or more races Hispanic/Latinx Black/African American Asian White, not of Hispanic origin

Not Specified

900

800

700

600

77.8% 616

500

76.2% 594

400

300

200

11.1% 88

10.8% 84

5.4% | 43

100

5.8% 45

3.5% | 29

2.5% | 2

2.9% | 23

0.5% | 4 1.1% | 9

6.2% 49

1.0% | 8

2.9% | 21

0

2021

2020

15

Source: University Human Resources Information Systems, December 2021

Our staff play a vital role in the College’s success. Staff members are largely responsible for the daily operations within CLAS and are integral and impactful members of the campus community who contribute significantly to not only the work of the College, but also its culture and identity. We view staff diversity as equally essential to our institution as faculty and student diversity.

CLAS has made some improvements in the gender balance among staff from 66.6% female / 33.3% male last year to 64.5% / 35%, respectively, this year. As with faculty diversity, some of our numbers of staff with diverse identities have increased while others have decreased. As we work through our DEI Action Plan, CLAS will be paying attention to our retention practices among staff, and we intend to implement a program similar to Path to Distinction for the recruitment of and hiring process for new staff members, as well as conducting exit interviews to address and reduce reasons for leaving.

Comparing the 2020-2021 and 2021-2022 reported race/ethnicity and gender data, the following graphs capture our most recent staff numbers.

CLAS Staff by Gender 2-Year Scope, by Academic Year

Male Female

Professional and Scientific, Merit

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

242 64.5%

2021

133 35%

250 66.6%

2020

125 33.3%

CLAS Staff by Reported URM Status, 2020 and 2021

Total**

URM*

*American Indian/Alaska Native, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latinx **Total includes all represented groups

Professional and Scientific, Merit

0

50

100

150

200

300

350

400

10 2.7%

375

2021

12 3.2%

375

2020

16

Source: University Human Resources Information Systems, December 2021

Asian White, not of Hispanic origin CLAS Staff by Reported Racial/Ethnic Status, 2020 – 2021 STAFF DIVERSITY

Hispanic/Latinx Black/African American

Two or more races

American Indian or Alaska Native

Professional and Scientific, Merit

Not Specified

400

350

300

250

85.6% 322

86.0% 326

200

150

100

50

6% 21

6.1% 21

0.3% | 1 1.1% | 4 1.1% | 4 1.3% | 5

0.2% | 1 1.6% | 6 0.5% | 2

3.9 % | 14 2.4% | 9

4.2% | 16

0

2021

2020

17

Source: University Human Resources Information Systems, December 2021

STUDENT DIVER

“ Educate yourself and make people feel like they they belong in this environment and they are ca

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RSITY

matter. Let them know apable of success. “

– Dayanna “Day” Martinez-Soto

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This graph compares the 2020-2021 and 2021-2022 race/ethnicity data for our undergraduate students. There is a slight difference from how fall 2020 undergraduate enrollment was counted, but the method for calculating URM and International students is consistent. In CLAS and University-wide, we have seen a steady decrease in the enrollment of international students, which can largely be attributed to the COVID pandemic, safety concerns, and restrictions on international travel. It will take time to rebuild these enrollment numbers once the crisis has passed. In CLAS we value the contributions of our international students and their diverse perspectives, and we recognize that we learn from them while they are learning in our classrooms. In the coming years, as we are able, the College will place an emphasis on rebuilding our international enrollments. UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS BY REPORTED RACIAL/ETHNIC STATUS 2020 – 2021

International

Total**

*American Indian/Alaska Native, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latinx **Total includes all represented groups

URM*

8000

0

2000

4000

6000

2021

2.6% 360

12.4% 1721

2020

3.6% 532

12.3% 1806

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Iowa Edge is a summer transition program for selected African American, Alaskan Native, American Indian, Asian American, Pacific Islander, Latino/a, first-generation, and LGBTQ+ students entering their first year at the University of Iowa. TRIO Student Support Services serves UI students who demonstrate academic need and are first-generation, or low-income, or have a verified disability.

The percentage of underrepresented minority (URM) students has held steady over the past year while the actual count of students has decreased, following a university- wide (and nationwide) trend of declining enrollments. As the College builds our overall recruitment strategies to boost enrollment, we will place particular emphasis on not only recruiting diverse students but also creating a more robust system of student supports and resources to improve retention and success rates. University of Iowa programs such as Iowa Edge and TRIO offer strong supports for URM students, but CLAS needs to examine how to build on those central programs and deepen internal support for our students throughout their experience in the College.

10000

12000

14000

16000

13,891

14,649

Source: MAUI census data, fall 2020 and 2021

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GRADUATE STUDENTS BY REPORTED RACIAL/ETHNIC STATUS 2020 – 2021

This graph compares the 2020-2021 and 2021-2022 reported race/ ethnicity data for graduate students. We have seen a small increase among international students. This increase is encouraging to see given the added barriers created by the COVID pandemic, safety concerns, and restrictions on international travel. The College is reviewing recruitment efforts for international students and is seeking to increase the diversity of its graduate student population.

International

Total**

URM*

*American Indian/Alaska Native, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latinx **Total includes all represented groups

1

0

200

400

600

800

1

11.4% 213

21.1% 392

2021

11.1% 205

19.3% 356

2020

22

1000

1200

1400

1600

1800

2000

1000

1200

1400

1600

1861

1849

Source: MAUI census data, fall 2020 and 2021

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SUPPORT EVERY DAY Dayanna “Day” Martinez-Soto is a fourth-year Social Work major from Des Moines. Day serves on the CLAS Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee, which aims to identify, understand, and change institutional structures that perpetuate inequity. During a conversation with Dean Sara Sanders, who also chairs the DEI Committee and is a Professor in the School of Social Work, Day shared her experience as a first-generation, LGBTQ+ Latina student in the College.

What has your experience at Iowa been like as an underrepresented minority student? Day: My first year here at the university was really hard. I was in Iowa Edge before classes started, and that really helped me. I met a lot of people who also identified the same way I do. It was just a little family. But then classes started, and that’s when it was like a huge cultural shock. It was just very lonely. I was an hour and a half away from home, and I wasn’t guided to more resources. I didn’t know who to go to with identities like mine. As a first-gen student, I don’t have that backbone at home, where I could go to my parents and tell them what’s going on and they would know what to do. I didn’t have that, and it really made me lose myself and who I was as a person here, for a while. Throughout the years, I learned to rely on myself to be successful. I did create relationships with professors, but I felt like I still couldn’t relate to anyone who was like me or had the answers I wanted.

How did you get involved with Iowa Edge? Day: I got an email from the university. It was this cool thing. We moved into the dorms a week early, and we just spent all day together for a week. But then after that, we went our own ways, and I would still see a lot of them around campus, but it wasn’t the same. What do you wish would have happened? What did you need? Day: I just wanted someone to come behind me and just tell me, “You’re doing it!” I needed people to acknowledge what I’ve been putting up with, what students like me have to endure, over and over and over again. It’s so frustrating. I have to dig deeper and work harder to do the same thing my partner (who is white and grew up here) is doing. I see other people who seem to be easily making it through, paying for school and having emotional support from home and the people around them who share their experience. They don’t have to worry about the same things I have to worry about. It was a daily battle for me.

LEARN MORE ABOUT IOWA EDGE

You felt like you were on an island without a strong community to prop you up. Has that changed since you’ve been here? Day: Now, I’m a senior and I don’t live on campus. I spend most of my time at my house, and I just do my homework there with my dog. I have my partner, and I guess I’ve just built a better relationship with her and her roommates, who have given me that support I was looking for. They know who I am and everything I’ve had to deal with. It’s like having the support of a family. I still feel like I don’t fit. In my lecture classes, it’ll often be me and maybe one other person of color. They say Iowa City is the most liberal and diverse city in the area—but when I came here, I didn’t see that. When I talk about my identity, I say I’m Mexican. I’m proud of my heritage. It’s a struggle because a lot of people say, “But you’re American. You’re here.” And I’m like, “I’m from Mexico. So I’m Mexican.” There is a disconnect between my identity and how society wants me to identify myself.

What advice would you give to your freshman self?

Day: It may seem cliché, but I would say to her, “You got this. You made it this far.” If someone identified similarly to me, I might warn them, “Hey, it’s not looking good out there. You just have to really work hard to get what you want.” But also: “You can power through it. You can do it like I’m doing it.” I don’t know how I even did it, but I pushed through. I held onto this American Dream fantasy; my parents didn’t come here for nothing. I have to push through for their sacrifice. What made you want to enroll at Iowa? Day: I wanted that full college experience—like you would see on a television show. I wanted that. I wanted to be American so badly. I was like, “If I go to college then I’m fitting into American values.” Do you still feel that way? Day: No, no. I love the way I am. I’m so different, and I feel like I have been able to teach so many people that I’ve met, more about how society is. I just learned to love myself and all of my experiences. Someday when I have kids, I’m going to be able to tell them, “Yeah, your mom did it, and you can do it too. Just be your authentic self.” And they will have the advantage of my experience, too. What support from CLAS added to your success? Day: I’ve been able to create relationships with my professors—School of Social Work professors—who have pushed me to be my better self, as an individual and in the profession. Mentor-wise, they have really helped me.

Would you say there’s been a greater conversation about DEI? Do you think we’re actually having more difficult conversations within the College? Or do you think that’s really still not happening? Day: I do know that there have been a lot of DEI committees being created. I’ve had a lot of people come to me for my opinions on things. There are also issues that are not being given proper attention. The university might put out two sentences or an announcement about it, and it’s never brought up again. I feel like the university is trying to keep the students at ease. A lot of students are very passionate and want more action done, but the university responds by giving them a small piece of closure or comfort and then not doing what is needed. How do you see us navigating as an institution in the climate that is walking a thin political line at all times? Do you feel that it is creating an openness to diversity of views? Or do you think that it’s actually forcing people like you to retreat and have more fear? Day: Just a couple of years ago, a student organization on campus put up a big banner saying “Build the Wall.” And a lot of students, including me, were very much caught off guard. The group said they were not trying to cause harm, that they were just trying to have these conversations. But it was harmful. When I saw that, I didn’t feel safe. I felt racially attacked. You don’t want to feel that way on your university campus.

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What changes does the College need to make to be more successful? Day: More resources for people like me. Mentorships. Scholarships. There are not enough scholarships, and it takes so much work and knowledge to even find them. I’ve looked, but I either don’t meet the GPA requirement, or I don’t see the representation. I don’t see people like me getting the assistance. It’s like when little kids see someone that looks like them, and they’re like, “Oh, I can do that, too, because you did it.” I didn’t have that growing up. My parents don’t have a college education. I told myself that I was going to be a construction worker because my dad was one. My roommate is going to be a teacher, and she talks about her class experience and how there are immigrant students who don’t speak English. She doesn’t know how to help them. I have told her what I will tell you: “Educate yourself and make people feel like they matter. Let them know they belong in this environment and they are capable of success.” I don’t think a lot of professionals are educated or have knowledge on better ways to deal with students who come from different backgrounds. I’m tired of having to educate each person. As a student, I shouldn’t have to be the role model. I shouldn’t have to be the teacher at the same time.

I also had an experience freshman year with a professor who asked me if I speak English, and if he was talking too fast for me. I was speaking with him in fluent English. I reported it. I did everything right. And nothing happened. The only option for me was to drop the class and take the W, or just keep on going with the class. I dropped the class, and I just retook the next semester with a new professor. What do you feel are our greatest strengths as far as diversity? Day: I think the outreach here is much improved. Now I get more emails providing information about resources and how to access them. I see more and more people here at the university who are trying to work toward progress and make DEI more prevalent here. I feel like a shift is taking place, but I think it’s going to be very slow. These are big problems, and we have to be persistent. What areas of DEI do you feel like the College needs to focus more on in the next few years? Day: You have to build a more diverse student body and make college more accessible. College is extremely expensive, and a lot of these underrepresented minority students come from low-income neighborhoods and families. Not saying all of them do, but I know five of the people in my high school came here, and the rest can’t afford it. And the costs get higher every year.

STUDENT SUPPORT NETWORKS

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HARD CONVERSA deep respec On a Thursdaymorning in

December, Dean Sara Sanders gathered a small group of CLAS faculty and staff inWild Bill’s, the School of SocialWork’s learning lab and meeting space in North Hall devoted to social justice, access, and inclusion. Sara asked the participants to reflect on the past year in the College, and to talk openlywith each other about their

impressions of our Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion efforts, achievements, setbacks, and aspirations.

Participants included Bradley Cramer, Associate Professor in Earth and Environmental Sciences and Provost’s Faculty Fellow for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Natalie Fixmer-Oraiz, F. Wendell Miller Associate Professor in Communication Studies and Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies; Naomi Greyser, Associate Professor in English, American Studies, and Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies; Ashley Howard, Assistant Professor in History and African American Studies; Jen Knights, Marketing and Communications Engagement Specialist in the School of Social Work; and Gabriella McDermott, Administrative Services Specialist in the Dean’s Office.

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Participants shared stories of how they came to be a part of the University of Iowa, and many agreed that a strong sense of communitywas a draw in the beginning and a factor that continues to contribute to their decisions to make a life here. All present observed important and ongoing problems of inequality and exclusion that they and colleagues face. And everyone expressed as well a sense that, within the university and in Iowa City, they have found community theymight not find elsewhere — from professional aspects such as a thriving, prolific culture aroundwriting, emphasis on creativity and interdisciplinary collaboration, and abundant opportunities to pursue research, to quality-of- life elements such as excellent public schools, parks for children, a vibrant queer community, and a manageable small citywith a quirky, artsy personality.

“After my first visit, I walked away saying, ‘Iowa is it.’ There was the intellectual life, the creativity, the curiosity, the camaraderie, the solidarity. It was amazing,” one participant said. “I felt like I understood what my mentors always told me when they said I’d know when it’s the right place.” So, what happens next? Once a new CLAS faculty or staff member—or student—joins the UI, how can the College work to support people’s careers, recognize their value as community members, and honor their experiences as humans? Considering this question, conversation participants voiced concerns about faculty retention, especially for faculty of color. The group agreed that colleagues often leave for a pay increase, and that there are also contributing factors of service fatigue, invisible labor, and at times disrespect— particularly for women and people of color. “Think about just the constellation of time, money, and resources, and then also, respect and celebration,” one participant said. “Sometimes we do the respect and celebration and don’t talk about the resources. Or we talk about resources, but not respect. These need to come together.” The group thought that time and pay should take into account DEI efforts, which typically fall on the shoulders of underserved and underrepresented, and often untenured,

I felt like I understoodwhat my mentors always told me when they said I’d knowwhen it’s the right place. “

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asked, “How can we inspire, reward, and incentivize more people to share this important work?” While they noted these challenges within CLAS, conversation participants also have witnessed advancements in equity during the time they’ve been a part of the College—in particular, in the past two years, when the College has sustained attention to DEI and included DEI targets and tactics in its Strategic Plan. Many pay disparities within departments have been acknowledged and changes have been made where possible. The College continues to analyze salary data and work to uncover and address other kinds of inequity. We know that disparities (of labor load and pay, for example) within a department, especially if those disparities follow trends based on faculty identity, can cause bitterness, reinforce negative stereotypes, deepen fatigue, and foster tension between colleagues—making productive, collective DEI work all the more difficult.

The group applauded CLAS’s adoption of the Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellowship program, created in 2019 to serve as a pipeline to tenure-track positions and increase faculty diversity in alignment with the University’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Action Plan. By following a similar model, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences could hire selectively and contribute to and benefit from the work of a talented and diverse group of fellows. “That opportunity to come in, get your feet underneath you, get mentorship, get your program up and running, then start teaching slowly, and transition to faculty is such an unbelievably supportive opportunity,” a participant said. “It’s super cool, and roundly applauded not just here but nationally.” Another colleague agreed, expressing appreciation that CLAS is emphasizing action. “I’ve noticed a shift toward discussing experience, practice, and structure—not just aspiration or image.” This emphasis involves candor about problems alongside problem-solving.

faculty and staff. They observed that the energy and effort of self-advocacy and working for a more just university leaves minoritized colleagues contributing more labor than their peers. Additionally, faculty participants indicated that several peer institutions are leading the way by offering additional incentives for individuals with joint appointments or other forms of uncompensated labor. By adopting such practices, CLAS could build a culture that not only recognizes this burden but also values it. “We keep seeing the same people in BUILD trainings and serving on committees or councils that focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion,” said one participant, who also

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The group is encouraged by the fact that CLAS is pursuing a project with the University of Iowa Human Resources team to pilot a process for UI-wide equity audits, with CLAS being among the first colleges to undergo this benchmarking process. “This will help us to illuminate areas of inequity in our hiring, employment, and advancement practices,” said one participant. “Then the DEI Committee and the dean can build realistic, data-driven plans to correct them.” The College is similarly assessing how we recruit, support, and retain underserved and underrepresented students. CLAS secured funding this year to discern best practices in student support through the Hawkeye Introductory Course Initiative, which analyzes drop-fail-withdraw rates in critical introductory courses; addresses root causes of students falling away from these classes (particularly URM students); and proposes changes to reduce attrition rates among first- and second-year students. Community continues to be a driving force for CLAS’s success in DEI. We recognize that not all in the College have access to the equitable, stimulating and supportive work environments they deserve. We want to recognize what is working well, as well as our growth-edge. Our research networks and collaborative environment connect CLAS faculty, students, and staff to other UI colleges as well as to national and international peers. And CLAS is striving to enact DEI work that connects us to each other in meaningful— and increasingly just—ways. “I say this to graduate students, and I mean it,” said one participant. “I’m like, ‘Look, we don’t have mountains. We don’t have oceans, but we have community. I can’t build mountains for you, but I will help you build community.”

Participants agreed that unity doesn’t necessarily mean unanimity. They suggested a shift in expectations that does not require agreement amongst colleagues. Different cultures and opinions can co-exist, even with friction, in every department, as long as there is a baseline of mutual regard, real listening and support. “To be clear, we argue, disagree, and fight in our department,” a participant said. “But we’re having hard conversations about diversity and equity with deep respect. I wish that weren’t unusual.” The group had several additional suggestions to align CLAS DEI activities with best practices and continue meeting our DEI benchmarks. They urged the College to provide resources to foster inclusion and retention. The group suggested finding ways to enhance access to community for URM faculty. Ideas included regular gatherings to help people connect with others who share their identity, a multicultural resource directory, and better spousal hiring programs—including reinvigorating a link between the university and the wider community of employers in the area. They noted that spousal hiring programs are another resource that saw a decrease in funding as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and deep budget cuts. One participant urged, “From the moment new faculty get on campus, endeavor to enrich all aspects of their lives: Support their research, service, family life, relocation.

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All of that needs to be attended to.” This is recognized as particularly critical for URM faculty arriving in a community and campus that is predominantly white. As the discussion came to a close, the group emphasized the importance of CLAS literally “building in” inclusion, such as more gender-neutral bathrooms and attention to accessibility for people with disabilities. “I think about space,” a participant said. “If you always have a space that is wheelchair accessible, if you always have captions on your Zoom calls, then we are building a culture where everyone is welcomed because we are eliminating barriers before you even get here. These changes are benefits to everyone.”

The group agreed that DEI work can and should belong to everyone, too.

“Lasting change can’t only come from advocacy by people with marginalized identities,” said one participant. “It’s really important to recognize that building a more equitable, more inclusive culture requires all of us working shoulder to shoulder.”

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DIVERSITY CATALYST AWARDS 2021

For more than twenty years, the Diversity Catalyst Awards have honored faculty, staff, students, programs, departments, and student organizations each year who engage meaningfully in DEI initiatives, promoting the development of an inclusive and diverse campus community. Congratulations to the CLAS faculty, staff, students, and alumni who were recognized at the 2021 Diversity Catalyst Awards, presented by the UI Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.

Diversity Catalyst Award Yolanda Spears (Social Work faculty, 2004 BA, 2007 MSW) Jessica Padilla Solis (2014 BA)

Diversity Catalyst Seed Grants Lindsay Moen (2011 BA) Rachel Howell (2005 BA)

BUILD Certificate The BUILD (Building University of Iowa Leadership for Diversity) Certificate is an opportunity for UI faculty, staff, and graduate students to gain strategic knowledge and skills to contribute to a welcoming and inclusive environment for all. By completing a series of workshops, participants can earn a certificate demonstrating their commitment as leaders for diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace and classroom. Learn more at https://diversity.uiowa.edu/programs/training-programs/build-training-initiative Register through Employee Self-Service

These members of the CLAS community completed the BUILD Certificate in 2020- 2021:

Nominations for the 2022 Diversity Catalyst Awards are nowbeing accepted. Please take time to nominate someone in your area who has gone above and beyond the scope of their jobs to promote diversity and inclusion on our campus. Recipients of the award are selected by a committee of UI students, faculty, and staff and will receive up to $500 and an engraved award. Nominations are due by noon on Monday, February 14, 2022. diversity.uiowa.edu/programs/diversity catalyst-awards The 2022 recipients of the Diversity Catalyst Award, Diversity Catalyst Seed Grant, the Alliant Energy/Erroll B. Davis, Jr. Achievement Award, and BUILD Certificates will be recognized at the 2022 Diversity Catalyst Awards Reception, to be held virtually on Wednesday, April 20, 2022. This event is free and open to the public to attend.

Jennifer Kayle Colleen Kelley Megan Knight Amy Korthank Rebekah Kowal Nicole Linderholm Angela Looney Heather Parrish Sara Pettit

Sohair Abul Haija Tiffany Adrain Cassandra Bausman Jaime Bell

Tiffany Phillips Adrienne Rose Praneel Samanta Jill Tobin Debra Trusty Pauline Wieland Plowan

Allison Bierman Stephen Bloom Jessica DeYoung Frank Durham

Tori Forbes Kathy Ford

Laura Goddard Megan Gogerty Mallory Hellman Adam Hooks Sarah Horgen Jane Huffman

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Get Involved! • Give Us Feedback or Ask A Question • Earn a BUILD Certificate • Nominate for a Diversity Catalyst Award • Watch Pursuing Racial Justice Videos

• Participate in Unity Week • Join a UI Diversity Council • Report a Problem

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College of Liberal Arts and Sciences | The University of Iowa 2021 ANNUAL REPORT ON DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND INCLUSION

Editor – Jen Knights Contributing writers — Grace Culbertson, Gabriella McDermott Photography — Jill Tobin, Office of Stratetgic Communication Design — Austin Montelius Administrative support — Gabriella McDermott Special thanks to Ryan Kinser, Karen Noggle, and Julie Rothbardt

Committee on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion College of Liberal Arts and Sciences | 2021-2022

Chair: Sara Sanders, Dean and Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion — College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Andrew Boge, Graduate Student — Department of Communication Studies Kajsa Dalrymple, Associate Professor — School of Journalism and Mass Communication Patrick Dolan, Lecturer — Department of Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies Jennifer Eimers, Associate Director — CLAS Academic Programs and Student Development Mark Fullenkamp, Director — CLAS Web Services, and Vice President, CLAS Staff Council Naomi Greyser, Associate Professor — Department of American Studies; Department of English; Department of Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies Jennifer Janechek, Lecturer – Department of Rhetoric Ryan Kinser, Associate Professor — Department of Mathematics Jen Knights, Marketing and Community Engagement Specialist – School of Social Work, and Secretary, CLAS Staff Council Dayanna Martinez-Soto, Undergraduate Student – School of Social Work Sara Mason, Associate Professor - Department of Chemistry Jane Nachtman, Professor — Department of Physics and Astronomy Yasmine Ramadan, Assistant Professor — Department of French and Italian Christine Rutledge, Professor — School of Music Denise Szecsei, Associate Professor — Department of Computer Science Deborah Whaley, Professor — Department of American Studies and African American Studies Program, and Administrative Fellow for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in the Dean’s Office Rachel Young, Associate Professor — School of Journalism and Mass Communication

Student Advisory Committee on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion College of Liberal Arts and Sciences | 2021-2022

Chair: Andrew Boge – PhD Candidate, Communication Studies Chair: Dayanna Martinez-Soto - Undergraduate student in Social Work, Spanish, Pre-Law

Souad Ahmed –Undergraduate student in Social Work, Psychology Rupanti Bose – Graduate student in Electrical and Computer Engineering

Mariana Dal Pra – Undergraduate student in Art and Art History Devin Ensley – Undergraduate student in Political Science, Pre-Law Selveyah Gamblin – Undergraduate student in Political Science, Ethics and Public Policy, Theatre Arts, Pre-Law CeCe Kelly-Harvey – Undergraduate student in International Studies Katie Michalski – Undergraduate student in Computer Science, Mathematics, Spanish, Pre-Law Sandrah Nasimiyu – Undergraduate student in Global Health Studies Tommy Nguyen – Undergraduate student in Biology Klaus Nsende – Undergraduate student in Social Work Brittney Osborn – Undergraduate student in Therapeutic Recreation Anup Poudel – PhD Candidate, Mathematics Madison Rambo – Undergraduate student in Actuarial Science, Mathematics

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