Razumich & Delamater - January 2019

OPENING STATEMENTS JANUARY 2019 WWW.LAWYERSREADYTOFIGHT.COM 317-934-9725 | INFO@RDLAWOFFICE.COM

FROM THE DESKS OF Razumich & Delamater

2019 is here, and, like a lot of people, I’ve made a New Year’s resolution. This year, my resolution is to eat at least three hot breakfasts each week. Breakfast is probably the meal I skip the most, since apparently I’m a bigger fan of sleeping than of eating. It’s probably also the one I should skip the least, since my staff routinely tells me I get cranky if I miss breakfast and then have to work through lunch (which happens WAY more regularly than I’d like to admit). It’s also not that hard; it takes about 20 minutes to fry up a half pound of bacon, 20 minutes to fry up 7 sausages, and an indeterminate amount of time to make pancakes; I make those infrequently enough that I’ve not bothered to time myself. Like most things in life, getting time to eat a hot breakfast is a matter of prioritizing your goals. I usually spend about 20 minutes checking emails each morning, so why not 20 minutes over a skillet instead? I’ll probably be happier. Hopefully your own resolutions go well, too. I’ll update everyone in six months to see how I managed.

SHERLOCKHOLMES’ 164 TH BIRTHDAY! ‘E lementary , M y D ear W atson .’

The most beloved of all fictional detectives, Sherlock Holmes, celebrates his 164th birthday this month. It’s speculated that Holmes would have been born on Jan. 6 of 1854, and fans across the globe gather each year on this date to observe his “birth.” People don their pipes, top hats, and long coats and, with a chorus of “The game’s afoot,” settle down for a weekend marathon filled with novels, short stories, movies, and TV shows. The character Sherlock Holmes was created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who finished his first novella in 1886, called “A Study in Scarlet.” Although Doyle is best known for his four novels and a handful of short stories about the private detective Holmes and Dr. John Watson, it wasn’t his life’s goal. Doyle wanted to become a historical novelist and wrote several novels of the genre which were admired in his time but did not receive the same attention as Holmes. The author became so disgruntled with Holmes and his popularity that he finally killed the beloved character in 1893. But due to the public’s overwhelming reaction, Doyle grudgingly brought him back in the early 1900s. One of the most noticeable characteristics of Holmes’ character is his ability to use observation to solve cases. Through reasoning and scrutiny of the people and areas around him, Holmes solves seemingly impossible mysteries. These characteristics were inspired by a professor Doyle met while attending medical school, Dr. Joseph Bell.

-John Razumich and Joe Delamater

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The professor impressed on the students how important observation was when diagnosing a patient. Bell also enjoyed picking a student from his class and guessing their particular profession based only on observation and inductive and deductive reasoning. Over the years, Holmes has influenced the creation of a number of characters in our modern world, including Dr. Gregory House from “House” and Spock from “Star Trek.”While many individuals enjoy the plethora of characters and shows inspired by Sherlock Holmes, there are also plenty of outright remakes, from “Sherlock” starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman to classics such as “The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes” starring Jeremy Brett and David Burke. To this day, fans continue to drink up the phenomenon Doyle created. Although fans may come together to celebrate the birth of their favorite detective on Jan. 6, it isn’t his canon birthday. Doyle never mentions an exact year or date. In

fact, in all Doyle’s works, Holmes’ age is mentioned only once, and that is in “His Last Bow,” Holmes’ final adventure. The detective is described as “a tall, gaunt man of 60.” From this, fans deduced that, since the book is set in 1914, Holmes must have been born in 1854. But why Jan. 6? The date was decided by a dedicated fan, renowned journalist and novelist Christopher Morley. Morley started the largest organization for Holmes fans, known as the Baker Street Irregulars. He speculated that Holmes’ birthday was on Jan. 6 because Holmes references William Shakespeare’s play “The Twelfth Night” twice within one story.

Morley wrote an article in the U.S. magazine “Saturday Review of Literature,” which was published on Jan. 6 of 1933. In it, he proposed that Holmes’ birthday was on the twelfth day of Christmas — Jan. 6. Ever since, fans across the world have dedicated this day as Sherlock Holmes’ birthday.

SGT. FIELDY COMES HOME Reuniting Brothers in Arms

There are around 2,500 military working dogs currently in service, and their efforts help save the lives of countless soldiers and civilians every day. One of these brave military dogs is Sgt. Fieldy, an 11-year-old black lab who was trained to locate the No. 1 threat in Afghanistan: IEDs. Sgt. Fieldy was deployed to Afghanistan with his handler, Cpl. Nicolas Caceres, in 2011. Early in their deployment, their vehicle struck a pressure plate while they were on patrol. Fieldy and Caceres were all right, but one of the other Marines in their company was badly injured in the explosion. The injured Marine could not be evacuated by helicopter until the landing zone was secured. Fieldy found another IED in the area and alerted Caceres. The bomb was quickly disarmed, and the injured soldier was taken to safety. This wasn’t the only IED Fieldy found. His sharp nose and dedication helped save thousands of lives. After his deployment, Caceres returned home, but Sgt. Fieldy served several more tours without him. While

Fieldy continued to protect soldiers and civilians by tracking down IEDs, Caceres worked tirelessly to make sure he could bring Fieldy home when his service was over. Military working dogs can be adopted by former handlers, law enforcement, or qualified civilians when they retire. After three years apart and a total of four tours served, Sgt. Fieldy was reunited with Caceres. In 2016, Fieldy received the K9 Medal of Courage Award, and in 2018, he won the American Humane Hero Dog Award for his service. “These dogs are out there with us,”said Caceres when he and Fieldy accepted the Hero Dog Award.“The dangers we face, they face them too. They deserve to be recognized. We ask so much of them, and all they want is to get petted or play with a toy. They’re amazing animals, and Fieldy is just an amazing dog. I can’t begin to express the gratitude I have for him.” If you are interested in supporting our nation’s working dogs or would like to adopt a retired working dog yourself, you can learn more at Missionk9rescue.org.

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Commemorating MLK Jr. A Message of Universal Love

2. EDUCATEYOURSELF ANDOTHERS ABOUT THE STRUGGLES PEOPLE HAVE FACED.

Inmany of his speeches and sermons, Martin Luther King Jr. spoke about love. He wasn’t talking about the romantic kind, though. King often used the term“agape,”an Ancient Greek word used to refer to the unconditional love of God for man, to talk about universal love for all people, regardless of race, religion, or circumstance. We commemorate King on Jan. 21. It’s a celebration and a National Day of Service, so take the opportunity to honor King’s message of universal love. Here are three ways to put agape into practice. Immerse yourself in King’s message this month by visiting the places where these historic events occurred. Our nation is full of opportunities to become better acquainted with the birth of the civil rights movement, from the King Center in Atlanta, Georgia, to Selma, Alabama, where protest marches were held in 1965. After all, if we don’t know our past, we are doomed to repeat it. 1. PAY AVISITTO A HISTORICAL SITE.

club, select an autobiography or biography that puts yourself in someone else’s shoes, like Maya Angelou’s “I KnowWhy the Caged Bird Sings,” or Rebecca Skloot’s “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.”

Learning about the experiences of others cultivates empathy. When you interact with someone across cultural or subcultural boundaries, it helps to reduce prejudice. Promote positive interactions in your community by hosting a film night or book club focused on the civil rights movement. You can feature a movie like “Selma” or “13th.” For a book

3. SHARE THE MESSAGE OF NONVIOLENCE AND GIVE BACK TO YOUR COMMUNITY.

At the center of King’s message was the principle of nonviolence. Consider how you can advocate for nonviolence in your community. You could donate your time or money to a local shelter for victims of abuse, or volunteer your home to foster abandoned pets. If you’re part of a PTA or another school organization, encourage students to put an end to bullying. The Mix It Up program has anti-bullying lessons and activities that support King’s message. Take some time to reflect on Martin Luther King Jr.’s vision this month and take part in the universal message of love. Don’t we all want more of that?

Take a Break!

CHICKEN CHOP SUEY Ingredients

2 large or 4 medium chicken thighs 3 pounds bok choy, cut into 3–4-inch ribbons

2 teaspoons sugar

2 tablespoons cornstarch, mixed with 4 tablespoons water

2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil

4 tablespoons vegetable oil

3 tablespoons oyster sauce

Salt and pepper, to taste

Directions

1. In large pot, boil three cups of water. Add chicken and reduce to simmer, cooking for 30 minutes. Remove chicken and let cool. Once cooled, remove skin and bones, chop, and set aside. Reserve the cooking liquid. 2. In a large skillet over high heat, heat vegetable oil. Once shimmering, add bok choy and cook for 1 minute, stirring throughout. Add half of reserved cooking liquid, cover skillet, and cook for 2 minutes. Remove cover and cook for an additional 5 minutes. Transfer bok choy to a plate. 3. Add remaining cooking liquid and chicken to the pan, maintaining high heat. Heat chicken, then add oyster sauce, sugar, cornstarch-and-water mixture, sesame oil, and bok choy. Season to taste, toss together, and serve over rice.

Inspired by The New York Times

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For many people, preparing for the New Year’s countdown is the most exhilarating part of the holiday season. You tune your TV to the Times Square ball drop, hand out party hats, confetti, and noisemakers, and meticulously line up some champagne flutes. What’s left to do? Pop open the champagne! There are many partiers who pop the cork with enthusiastic and careless abandon, while others point the bottle away from their faces and anxiously twist the cork until they hear those bubbles surge to the surface. Turns out, while the latter practice may be slightly less fun, it’s certainly the safer approach. On April 8, 1978, Charles J. Murray was injured when a natural cork stopper spontaneously ejected from a bottle of previously unopened Almaden Blanc de Blancs champagne and struck him in the left eye. He was preparing to serve the bubbly to a party of 40 people, so he placed 12 bottles INSIDE THIS ISSUE From the Desks of Razumich & Delamater PAGE 1 Who Is Sherlock Holmes? PAGE 1 What Happens to Military Service Dogs? PAGE 2 Put MLK Jr.’s Message of Love Into Practice PAGE 3 Take a Break PAGE 3 Chicken Chop Suey PAGE 3 Watch Out for Rogue Champagne Corks This Year PAGE 4

PUTTING THE ‘PAIN’ IN CHAMPAGNE Spontaneously Ejecting Cork Causes Lawsuit

on a rolling cart and removed the foil and wire retainer from three or four bottles — including the one that eventually injured him. Once he started to roll the cart toward the guests, the cork shot out of the bottle all on its own.

bottles: “WARNING: THIS BOTTLE IS UNDER PRESSURE. THE STOPPER WILL EJECT SOON AFTER THE WIRE HOOD REMOVAL. TO PROTECT AGAINST INJURY TO FACE AND EYES, POINT AWAY FROM SELF AND OTHERS WHEN OPENING.” When it comes to bubbly-induced mayhem, the greatest potential trouble lies in the eye of the beholder — literally. With an estimated velocity of 60 miles per hour, uncontrolled corks do in fact fly faster than the blink of an eye. To avoid having to explain a not-so- fashionable eye patch at work on Monday, handle those fizzy drinks with care.

Due to the severity of his injury, Murray sued Almaden Vineyards, Inc.,

National Distillers and Chemical Corporation, and Carbo, Inc., alleging that they were responsible because they failed to include

a proper warning label on the bottle. The defendants, however, argued that the cork stopper did not and could not spontaneously eject unless Murray had handled the bottle improperly. The case was argued by both sides for two years, but eventually, Murray won. Almaden Vineyards now prints the following on its

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