Florida Women's Law Group - September 2018

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WOMEN’S

Advocate September 2018

HOPE FOR THE BEST, EXPECT THEWORST Advice for Hurricane Season

If you’re lucky enough to have friends and family in the region you can stay with, keep those avenues open. You should still look up a list of shelters in your area just in case. Thankfully, even the most powerful storms are slow-moving and relatively predictable. So as long as you keep an eye on the Weather Channel, you should have time to decide if and when you and your family are going to evacuate. I would advocate for earlier departures based on my experience with Irma last year. I thought I was leaving in time to beat the traffic, but I found myself in 11 hours of gridlock. Keep bottled water and snacks on hand this time of year; you’ll need them if you get stranded in a shelter or on the interstate. Evacuations do add an extra level of stress to anyone going through a separation or custody battle. Contacting your ex will always be hard, natural disaster or not. But you should find a way to inform them of where you’re evacuating your children. Chances are that they are worried about their kids’ safety, and taking the time and emotional energy to let them know they will be safe is a great gesture of good faith. If you absolutely do not want to have contact with your ex, consider having a mutual friend relay the message. This is just my advice as one Florida mother to another. There are a lot of great resources online that can help you develop a hurricane plan that fits your family’s needs. At ready.gov/hurricanes, you’ll find great hour-by-hour advice for preparing for and dealing with the aftermath of a severe storm. The City of Jacksonville also has an app called JaxReady, which will give you the most up-to-date information on evacuation zones and local shelters in the lead-up to a storm.

2018 Jacksonville Business Journal Fast 50 2018 Florida Super Lawyers list

At the time of writing, it’s still relatively early in hurricane season, and we’re keeping our fingers crossed that this year will prove quieter than the last. But as writer Angela Carter once said, “Hope for the best, expect the worst.” Keeping last September’s experience with Hurricane Irma in mind, it’s important to remember that storms can pose a threat to northeast Florida. Having been born and raised in this state, I tend to be more skeptical than alarmist when it comes to hurricanes. But since becoming a mother, I’ve realized it’s best to be safe and comfortable rather than miserable — or worse, in danger. So as we hit the high point of the season, I urge our readers, especially those new to the area, to have a plan in place. First and foremost, if you live in a mandatory evacuation zone, evacuate . The authorities are serious when they say that no rescue crews will venture into those areas in the immediate aftermath of a storm. No one is coming to help you in an emergency. I cannot stress enough that you should not take this risk. Evacuations have been put into effect in the past two years, so even if this year turns out to be quiet, it’s best to know your options ahead of time.

FloridaWomensLawGroup.com

(904) 241-0012

4312 Pablo Professional Ct. Jacksonville, FL 32224

Here’s hoping for a quiet season,

“EVACUATIONS DO ADD AN EXTRA LEVEL OF STRESS TO ANYONE GOING THROUGH A SEPARATION OR CUSTODY BATTLE. CONTACTING YOUR EXWILL ALWAYS BE HARD, NATURAL DISASTER OR NOT. ”

-Heather Qu ick

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FloridaWomensLawGroup.com

www.floridawomenslawgroup.com

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