Fitness Lab. New Year Injury Prevention

N E W S L E T T E R

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Safely Perfoming Front Raises • Practice Healthy Dieting For 2020 9 Conditions That Stifle Your Stride • Exercise Essentials

N E W S L E T T E R

START YOUR 2020 OFF RIGHT!

KEEP THESE FOUR FACTORS IN MIND TO HELP PREVENT INJURIES! STRETCH. Stretching is one of the most important ways to prevent injuries. Your muscles and other tissues require oxygen, nutrients, and blood flow to be elastic. Stretching helps bring these things into the tissues making them more elastic and allowing them to stretch more. This prevents over-stretching and tearing.

Typically, this person is more prone to injury, just because they are not prepared. If you have a hard time running, then you wouldn’t go out and do a marathon. Make sure that you train properly and safely for the sport or activity you would like to try. WEAR PROPER EQUIPMENT. Make sure you have the right equipment to prevent injuries when doing activities. Good running shoes, proper hiking boots, helmets and much more can make the difference when it comes to preventing injury. Still concerned that you may injure yourself during activity? Contact The Fitness Lab today for a consultation at 303.800.2829! We will help you return to a pain-free and active lifestyle!

HYDRATE AND NUTRITION. Your body is more than 70 percent water and therefore requires water to be supple and function at its best. Without adequate water and nutrition, your body’s tissues are more prone to injury. Hydrate and make sure you replenish the electrolytes you lost during activity with a sports drink like Gatorade. STAY WITHIN YOUR ABILITIES. We have all heard of the term “weekend warrior” which means a person that has not prepared their body at all to go out and do extensive sports or activities on the weekend.

A R E Y O U L E T T I N G Y O U R PA I N H O L D Y O U B A C K ? C A L L T O S C H E D U L E Y O U R A P P O I N T M E N T T O D AY !

S A F E L Y P E R F O RM I N G F R O N T R A I S E S

KEEP THE WEIGHT OFF YOUR SHOULDERS

Weight training offers a variety of muscular benefits. Dumbbell front raises target your the front or anterior region of the shoulders or deltoids and are commonly incorporated in an upper body weight training workout. Perform front raises two or three days per week with at least a day of rest between sessions to allow your muscles to adequately recover. Dumbbell front raises develop your anterior (frontal) shoulder muscles. Depending on your training volume, completing front raises can result in an increase in your shoulder muscular size or strength. Front raises are an isolation exercise, meaning they require movement around only one joint. As a result, it’s an effective exercise for targeting a small number of muscles. Unlike when using front raises on a machine, completing front raises with dumbbells and while standing requires your core muscles to contract to keep you on balance. Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, a dumbbell in each hand, palms facing the fronts of your thighs. Keeping core tight and arms straight and in front of you, raise weights to shoulder height, palms facing the ground. Pause for 1 second. Slowly return to start for 1 rep. Need help with exercises and getting back into shape for 2020? Contact The Fitness Lab today for a consultation at 303.800.2829! We will help you return to a pain-free and active lifestyle!

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EAT MORE OMEGA-3S. Getting more foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, like seafood, might just help you keep your blood pressure down. Research suggests that omega-3s can help improve your mood, which we all need a little help with in the short, dark days of winter. Aim to get two servings of fish a week, particularly fatty fish, such as salmon, sardines and some types of tuna, which are rich in omega-3s. Not a fish lover? Opt for walnuts and flax, which are good non fish sources of omega-3s. PILE ON THE VEGGIES. The majority of people don’t eat the daily recommended 3 or more servings of vegetables, according to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Roasting vegetables

EAT LESS MEAT. A popular reason to cut back on meat is for environmental reasons, but you’ll be helping your heart too. When you replace meat with soy, you’ll naturally eat less saturated fat. While tofu might not have a real “flavor,” that’s what makes it so versatile—it soaks up the flavors of a stir-fry sauce or marinade like a sponge, making it taste terrific! REIN INYOURSUGARADDICTION. We eat too much sugar. We consume 355 calories—or 22 teaspoons—of added sugars a day. Luckily, you can still make treats that satisfy your sweet tooth and cut back on your sugar intake at the same time by choosing treats that are naturally sweet like fruit.

caramelizes their natural sugars so they taste fantastic. It’s an easy way to cook veggies for dinner—pop a pan of them in the oven and make the rest of dinner while they roast. UP YOUR FIBER INTAKE. Getting enough fiber may help prevent cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and a number of cancers. And eating more fiber may help you slim down. But the average person eats about 14 grams a day—the recommended daily intake is 21 to 38 grams. One of the easiest ways to up your fiber intake is to eat more whole grains. Quinoa, whole-wheat couscous, bulgur and polenta are all quick-cooking options to add to your weeknight repertoire.

9 COND I T I ONS THAT ST I F L E YOUR STR I DE Problemswithrunningarenotadirectconsequenceofgettingolder.Rather, theyare theeffects of other conditions that become more common and severe with age. Common risk factors for severe problems with running include advanced age (older than 85) and multiple chronic disease conditions such as heart disease, arthritis, dementia, stroke, hip fracture or cancer. Common conditions that contribute to running problems include some of the following: 1. Back pain 2. Joint pain and arthritis 3. Diseases of the muscles or bones 4. Poor fitness 5. Problems after orthopedic surgery or stroke 6. Low blood pressure and heart disease 7. Parkinson’s disease 8. Vision or balance problems 9. Fear of falling If you’re experiencing any of these conditions and need help to get back on track, call The Fitness Lab at 303.800.2829 today!

ARE YOU WEARING THE RIGHT RUNNING SHOES?

EXERC I SE ESSENT I AL S

R E L I E V E L O W B A C K P A I N !

KEEP THIS IN MIND WHEN CHOOSING YOUR NEW KICKS:

Have a Break-In Period. If you’re trying on shoes that feel heavy, stiff, clunky or not just right they likely are the wrong shoes for you. The right pair will feel comfortable as soon as you put them on: light weight, cushioned, and balanced. Keep Your Feet Level. If you feel your arches “tipping in”or “pushedout”, then thesupport is wrong for you. Too much support will restrict your foot and give the feeling you’re tipped out. Too little support may feel like your foot is caving in and give the tipped in feeling. The proper pair will feel balanced and level. Wear Shoes True to Size. Running shoes should have ample toe room, but secure from the ball of the foot to the heel. Your feet will splay out over time and it’s not uncommon to go up in size. Running shoes won’t break in, so they need to feel like they fit the second you put them on.

PRONE ON ELBOWS While lying face down on your stomach, slowly raise your upper body up and prop yourself onto your elbows. Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat 5 times.

SWAN DIVE Lay on stomach with your arms overhead. Press your chest upwards, keeping the muscles in your trunk and legs relaxed. Repeat 6 times.

IF YOU ARE UNSURE OF COMPLETING THESE EXERCISES OR EXPERIENCE PAIN WHEN DOING SO, STOP AND CONSULT YOUR PHYSICAL THERAPIST.

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H I GH F I BER REC I PE

R OA ST E D B RU S S E L S P R OU T S

INGREDIENTS • 3/4 lb Brussels sprouts (trimmed/halved) • 2 carrots (peeled/sliced into 1/2” pieces) • 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil • 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar • 1 tsp chopped rosemary leaves

• 1 tsp chopped thyme leaves • Kosher salt • Freshly ground black pepper • 1/2 cup toasted pecans • 1/2 cup dried cranberries

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 400°. Scatter vegetables on a large baking sheet. Toss with oil, balsamic vinegar, rosemary, and thyme. Season with salt and pepper. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until the vegetable are tender, shaking the pan halfway through. Before serving, toss roasted vegetables with pecans and cranberries. In a large bowl, toss vegetables with oil, balsamic vinegar, and herbs. Season with salt and pepper. This dish is perfect for your Thanksgiving vegetable side dish. Source: delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a50228/holiday-roasted-vegetables-recipe

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