Foust Law - September 2020

Foust Law Office

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

www.lucasfoustlaw.com 406-587-3720 Fax: 406-879-4400

3390 South 30th Avenue Bozeman, MT 59718

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Sending Young Men Into This New World PAGE 1 Should You Be Able to Change Your Legal Age? PAGE 2 Shop Online for Your Kids Like a Pro PAGE 2 3 Fun Family Activities for Fall PAGE 3 Take a Break PAGE 3 Bacon and Egg Breakfast Pizza PAGE 3 How 11 Days Were Deleted From History PAGE 4 SOLUTION

11 DAYS DELETED FROM HISTORY How the British Changed Their Calendar System and Caused Chaos

For centuries, Europeans used the Julian calendar, created by Julius Caesar in 46 B.C. It was based on the solar calendar, so most of Europe thought it was the most accurate calendar. However, over the centuries, dates had “drifted,” and many important days, like Easter and the spring equinox, were no longer falling on the dates they were supposed to. To compensate, the new Gregorian calendar was developed and put to use by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582. It helped put things back in order and eliminated the extra day every 128 years. However, not everyone adopted the Gregorian calendar right away, such as the British. That meant that Europeans were using two diverging calendars for over 200 years. Talk about confusing! People realized that as the world started to expand and as countries

The people were not happy. English historians found research that British citizens chanted “Give us our 11 days!” in the streets. The phrase became so popular that some politicians even campaigned with that as their slogan. Several other historical accounts state that many people were worried that by cutting the calendar, their own lives would be cut 11 days shorter. There was a lot of confusion and chaos, but over time, dates fell where they were supposed to, and everyone lived their full lives, those 11 days included.

became more connected, having a single calendar system was critical.

Finally, the British chose the year 1752 to make the change. But, in order to make it work, they had to “jump” forward. For instance, 1751 could only be 10 months long — starting with March and ending with Dec. 31, 1751. But even that adjustment didn’t quite bring the English up to speed in time to make the shift. They also had to cut 11 days from 1752. The unlucky dates that were cut were Sept. 2–14, 1752.

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