1912

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Jl1bli~{,.b bu I:lJqr ~l'ui(lr allnnn IDQr iuffalo Normal §rQool illitffaln. N. 'Ilf.

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irbtrnttnu

'rhtripal iantd Upton t4r i>ruior mlnaa of NiurtrtU iliuullrrll null w\urlnt moat grntrfullu null ftllprctfullu lItllirntt t4i 5 lIflllumt

DANIEL UPTON, B.S. , M.E. Principal

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1Boarll of 1£lltiorn

I-IELEN MAKEY Editor-in-Chief

SAMUEL F. KING Business 1\1 anager CORA C. KAUTH Assistant Edito1·

EDKA SAYLES Treasurer

RUTH JAMES Litemry Editor

BEK JA"IlN H. TIMM A dver/ising Editor

YlARY BONNET Pictures

SAVILLE MCCON)1ELL Il-umorou5 Editor

LORETTA ~CQUADE K indergaften

LENORA E. \VALKER R. PRA"IT KRULL

o r Ut o r N INETEEN hundred and twelve has wit– nessed many important events during its school life, and among others is the first appearance of "THE ELMS." The Editors realize the shortcomings of this pioneer volume, but we trust that our critics will be lenient. We are su re that each succeeding volume will excel its predecessor, until "THE ELMS" takes its place among the best school annuals. May the following pages serve at least to recall to the memories of our class the happy hours spent beneath the "old elms" of the Buffalo Normal School.

At knoUt l~~gm~ntn T HE Board of Editors acknowledge with t han k s the kindly assistance of Mr. Upton, Mr. Maycock, Miss Viele, Miss Kempke and JVliss Benson, in the preparation of this Volume.

1Boar~ of :!IIauagrrn

HON. EDWARD I-I. BUTLER P.resident

HON . HENRY W: HILL Secretar,), and Treasu'fet

:vIR. ROBERT L. FRYER H ON. GEORGE A. D AVIS

:\IR. HOBART WEED

HON. HENRY W. H I LL

H ON . GEORGE A. DAVIS

MR. HOBART WEED

HON. EOW!\RD H . BUTLER President.

II

!I

.1J1urulty

GERTRUDE i\lI. BACON Principles of Education, Supervisor of Teaching

GRACE VIELE, B. L. Histor y, Librarian

MARK M. MAYCOCK, M. P. Drawing, Penmanship

SUSAN FRANCES CHASE, B. L., M.A., Ph.D. Psychology

MARCUS A. G. MEADS, B. S. Mathematic!, Logic

IDA L. KEMPKE, Ph.:B. English

HELEN G. ENGLEBRECK, A. B. HiJtory of Education, If is/ory, Recoras

IRVI NG P. BISHOP, :VL'S. Science) Natw"e Study

HARRISON C. G IVENS, M. E. f/ ocational Edu{ali m

15

BESSIE 1. BISHOP Science

J ANE E. KEEr..ER Methods in Rt ading"Calistkenics

GEORGINA E. CIIAf>'lOT 111anual Training, Sewing

ELIZf\ BETH C. LANGE Principal, Department of If ousehold Arts

HELENA M. SIMONDS Houuhold Arts, Science

LOUISE M. CASSETY

Principal, Kindergarten Department

AMELI A B. S~RAGUE Dra'wing

CORA M. SAGER Music

HELEN 1. DUNSTON School Economy, 'History CAROLINA E. FLANDERS Methods in Geography

2

114ru t4r ®111 ~r4nnll1a!i Nrm (From Iht" Prospectus of tht Slate N01"mal School and College al Buffalo, N, Y,", 18 7 1 ) lI/iniury uf tl)r ~d!UUl O N the occasion of the annual festival of the teachers of the Public Schools of the city, held June 23, 1866, on the present sitc~of the school"addresses were made by Jesse Ketchum, Esq., O. G. Steele, Esq., Judge Clmton and others strongly urging those present to take immediate steps for securing the locati~n of a Normal School at Buffalo. The lot of ground at present occupied by the. sc hool had lo~g bc~n h~ld by IvIr. Ketchum for such ~ purpose, a~1d it had been a cherished desIre wIth hIm to sec such a school estabhshed upon It. In Ap ril 1867, a bill authorizing the location of a school at Buffalo ... became do law. A su~ of $45,000 was appropriated by Erie County, and subsequently ~ like sum by the City of Buffalo, for the erection of a building. The cornerstone was laid on April 15, 18 6 9, (From" A description furnished by the architect, ]. H. Selkit'k, Esq. ") The bui lding is three stories in height. The Jersey Street front is one hundred sixty-fo ur feet long, and the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Street fronts are each eighty-five feet, The basement story is ten feet high with longitudinal and transverse corridors each ten feet wide. The rooms, which are light and airy, being mostly above the surface of the grade, will be used for janitor's rooms, wardrobes, closets and fuel and boiler rooms, the latter of which is fireproof. The first story is thirteen feet high with corridors corresponding \vith the basement, and three flights of stairs to the second story. It contains a recep– t ion room, the Principal's rooms and class rooms. The second story is sixteen feet high with short corridors, and nvo stair- ways to the third story. It contains an assembly room, sixty-three by seventy– seven feet, the Principal's office, library, t\'.:o ladies' dressing rooms and four recitation rooms. The th ird story -is eighteen and one half feet high, and contains a haU;sixty– three .by seventy-seven feet, cabinet, museum and five recitation rooms. The building is in the Italian style, with IVIansard roof . The facade fronting on Jersey Street ... consists of a gabled centre and two slightly projecting wings with two· turrets; two flights of spacious stairs lead to the two front doors, one of which opens beneath a bold, heavy stone frontispiece into a towcr sixteen feet sq uare, and, including the clock section and pi:lIlacle, one hundred and nventy feet high. The opposite door enters the opposite ..... ving beneath a spacious canopy .. . The entire building will be warme'd with stcam and thoroughly ventilated. (F~om the "Ci1"Cu.lar of the State NormaL School and College at Buffalo, N. Y.", tSJ1ud Janu.ary IS, [872) iGural 1Buarll uf Wrunirrn

lJu :£illrmnriam

MISS ISABELLE GIBSON MR. JOSEPH MISCHKA MISS EDITH HUSON

"They were Builders"

NATHAN K. HALL, Buffalo, President. \VILLIAM H. GREENE, Buffalo, Secretary. JOSEPH \VARREN, Buffalo, Treasurer. THOMAS F. ROCHESTER, Buffalo.

GROVER CLEVELi\ND, Buffalo. HENRY LAPP, [vI. D., Clarence. FRANCIS H. ROOT, Buffalo. ALBERT H. TRACY, Buffalo. ALLEN PO'lwrER, East Hamburgh. 19

18

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(From I.he First Annual Report of the Local Board) I January 1871, Henry B. Huckham, A. M., was

I

appointed Principal

f h n ell001 .. '. and was charged with the duties of preparing detailed plans for o t esf ' . h . bl b' d . . n',zation and of con ernng WIt sU lta e persons to e appotntc lllstrllctors ,ts org a , .' "I h . . . He entered our service w 1Y arc ... (From the Circular of J an. 15, 18 72 ) 3l! amliy IIf lhuliructillu

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English Language, Philosophy and Didaclics Ancient and Modern Languagts Pure and Applied Mathematics

HENRY B. BUCKHAM , A. M. ""CUAM B. WRIGHT, A. Y!. CALVIN PATfERSON '~JARY J, HARMON SA'RAH BOSTWICK CHARLES W. SYKES GEORGE HADLEY, iVL D. DAVID S. KELLICOTT, B. S. LAURA G. LOVELL SUSAN HOXIE :''''ARK y !.:VIAYCOC K

Elocution, Rhetoric and Composition Geography and Elementary Methods Focal Music Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology Natural Philosophy, Physiology, etC.

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English and Mathematics Second General Assistant Pen111,anship and Drawing

SCHOOL OF PRACTICE

. First Gradt* Second and Third Grades Third and Fourth Grades Fifth and Sixth Grades Seventh and Eighth Grades Ninth and Tenth Grades

E. CRANDA LL

FLORA

ADA ~/L KENYON 1\ ELLIE E. WII,LlAMS SUSAN HOXIE ISABELLA GIBSON ~IARY ~/L \VlLLIAMS

(From the Prospectus) The school will be organized in three departments: Normal, Collegiate and Scientific. In addition to these, a class of each grade of pupils in the Public School s of Buffalo will be instructed in the b uilding, as a "School of Practice" for the No rmal Schoof. L THE NORMAL DEPARTMENT 'There will be three courses of study, as follows : I. Elementary. Students whose education in the common branche.s is deficien t will have the opportuni ty of making up tha t deficiency. The authorit ic~ of the school will insist that all who need it shall pursue this course ... 2. Advanced English. All who pass a satisfactory examination in the studies itAt that time, the highest grade was known as the First.

BUFFALO STATE NORMAL SCHOOL "VHEN FIRST BUILT

21

these classes, wi~h o the~'s charged w~th this du~y) will be "critics of teaching" " Model lessons wdl be glven by the Instructor tn methods of tea chmg, and simila· lessons I,vill be required of the pupil-teacher before his classmates. In additio r to this, the schools of t he city \-\rill be open- at proper times and under prope n reg~lations as "Schools of Observation" and as such will be visited by the Norma~ pupJis. The objective me t hod of teaching will receive due attention. While the school will not make this system a specialty to the exclusion of what may be called the textbook method, it will recognize its true value in the work of education and will aim to instruct its students in the judicious use of objects and of oral lessons in the lower grades and to some extent in all grades. II. COLLEGlATE DEPJ\RTMENT* ... The .Board have authorized the opening of a Collegiate Department ... The design of th is department is to give the opportunity of pursuing as t horough and as extended a cou rse of study' in the Normal College of Buffalo as is pursued at other colleges. It is bel ieved that the methods of instruction and the zeal and spirit exhibi ted by a properly selected Facu lty of a Normal School are such as to make them specially qualified to carry the student through the entire course of academic studies. It is fu rther believed that the presence in the same institution of No rmal students and of college studen ts will be mutually beneficial. The in– dustry and devotion to a fixed and definite purpose, which always marks the true Normal pupil, will fur nish a correct example to a ll in the in stitution that cannot fail of good results. On the other hand , the influence of those who are pursuing more advanced studies, and who are, therefore, continually presenting proofs of the intellectual power and cu lture that always come from the pursuit of these studies, must be encouraging and stimulating to others. The Board think there is room for one college in the State which sh all keep before it t he idea of preparing teachers for high schools and semina ries and, when its system is per– fected, for other colleges. I II . SClENTlFIC DEPARTMENT* The design of this department is to prepare the stu dent for employment as practical chem i ~t, engineer, surveyor, etc. (From a pamphlet issued by the Principal, June " I873) S>uhjrda of ~tulll! ELJ:;MENTARY ENGLISH COURSE YEAR I Arithmetic Grammar and Analysis Geography . History of Vnited States Reading Linear Drawing Composi lion ADVANCED ENGLISH COURSE-YEAR I :NIental Arithmetic Algebra Natural Philosophy Chemistry Physical Geography English Langu age Reading Perspective History of Uni ted States Government of United States CLASSICAL COURSE YEAR I Algebra ;: Natural Philosophy Chemistry Reading H istory of Uni ted States Government of Un-ited States Latin. or German YEAR Il Geometry and Trigonometry Latin. or German Greek; or Subjects of Year II, Ad– vanced English Course YMR HI La tin or Greek, a nd Professional Subjects *The plans for this department were never carried out. 22

PROFESSIONAL COURSE Required of all Graduates

CEO ENGLISH COURSE

AVVAN .

YEAR II (;eomelry and Trigonometry Ph y,io\ogY Zoology BOlany \ SLronolUY \lineralogy and Geology lIislory of England Rhetoric ('jeneral History I.:nglish Literature

Mental Philosophy Moral Philosophy

School Economy and School Law Methods of Teaching Elementary Subjects . Methods of Giving Object Le~sons Methods of Teaching Advanced Su bjects Model Lessons with Normal Classes Teaching and Observation in School of P rac tice , d M' 'e 'In t>:un General

.

I'

,h·

Voc'ti Gymnastics an

USIC at ,

. ,

enmans IP,

5 c1hng

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.P

h' h the several cou rses.

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ExerCises t .rotl,gl~ T Rhetonca

•• 'for presentation in Chapel, from each class In turn.

~xelCls es (F rom

the FiTSt Annual Report of the Local Board) on vVedncsday September I3t , d

h * . h fift

y-

Wit

. . . The. school oPlende seven pupils In the norma epat me . .. z; t h. ,t nt

The formal opening took place October

~un\tnnrl! of Attrnllnnrr

86 II 75

\\'hole number registered Gentlemen Ladies. . . . Average age of gen.tlemen Average age of lad les

17.27 years 17.77 years

Nrrlla of tllr ~dlool

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,

3 Furniture for three addi tional rOoms for the. School of Pr~cttce. The Norm~1 students and IZO pupils ?f. the School of Prac tice have now, 111 co~mon) one study or school room cOllt f a111 h lIl g b 24IdOndges~{ys . th~· State Au thorities, the Local 6 After the acceptance 0 t e U I I . h p.. . 1 Board· found it necessary to make .some provision for a .resld~nce for t e 11ll"C1pa, and undertook to arrange SUitable roomst for thIS pul pose. .. .

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1JlirJlt QIommrnmnrnt iExrrriMa OF 1'H~ iluffttlo Nornml ~rl)ool On Tue.~day, July 1, 1873, at f2 P. M. 1);1 THE NOH~lAL CHAPEL

<.

I.

CLORA IN E X.C ELSIS

By the School

SCRIPTURE LESSON ,\~D PRAYER

2, 3,

. Mountain Song

~I[U SIC

Queen Elizabeth

ESSAY

4,

'~1871. tin the school building,

23

5· *ESSAY 6. *ESSAY 7· *EssJ-\ Y 8, ESSAY

E Tllht PBower and Habit of Observation in Child en fOWn fen

"

Hugh Miller

S I · E C· ara 1 •

ooper

"

"

"

"

Little Things and L ittle Dutie!

Ma rion :tvlcKinlay M · . . j ary A. Howell Rosa 1. Anoski J I "· A "\1 " U 1a •

The Teacher Always a Leanter

*ESSAY

Picton'al Papers and Story Book!

ro.

*ESSAY

Lady ] one Grey

oas i. .: !v[ LGeography in Nature and in Textbook! aVlllla 1 . anyon "A ' H"" Wor!, and Wagt! gnes . Barnes .E" '. No Step Backward

II.

E SSAY

T HE spirit of institutions lives and grows from their traditions, and these arc, in turn, the outgrowth of abiding memories of lives or acts, wh ich have strongly impressed the impul ses of mankind. \Vhether scated, then) under the elms or strolling on the lawn o r working with in the shelter of the old huilding , how great should be the inspiration to everyone of us from the cloud of witnesses to past achievement which hover about this school Great sou ls have here received t hei r consecration to work for others. Great problems, affecting the welfare of peoples scattered to the ends of the ear th, have becn solved by forces set in motion in t his institution. The elms will live} the traditions will live, and the old building will live in memory, although now, having span ned a life of noble usefulness and having come down to old age mantled and crowned with honor, it gives way to another wh ich we trust may enla rge and enrich the heritage which it receives. The school ministers to humanity, whose increasing entanglements and problems are every day calling fo r new- means of escape from p resent troubles and help in avoiding impending ones. It follows , therefore, that the new school must, in order to do the things demanded of it, embody nell{ ideas and facilities for broadening the range of activities. The changes will largely consist of equipment for training for every branch of service along the newer lines which have been proven worthy of incorporation into a sc heme of public education. This docs not mean the elimina ti0l1 of any of t he old culture. Indeed it does not mean the int roduction of anything which is not cultural, but it does mean that into the old we shall bring the new culture whi ch comes through do– ing 'well and with pleasure what our hanos as well as our heads find to do. And is this so new after all? Is it not as old as honesty, kindness and ability, with– ou t which culture is of little avail? New halls will take the places of the ole!, yet we shall hope that the traditions of the old will dwell happily in the new. New walls will relieve the old, but we trust that the vines will cling as tenderly to t he new as to the old, and that the elms which have g rown up and sheltered the old building 'which had watched over them in their infancy wi !! cast their same friendly shade a bou t their new COffi– panion,-and may the old in its passi ng leave a sweet and lasting benediction on the new.

12.

*ESSAY

13·

"'ESSAY

<'dith G. P arsons Mary A. \Vhippie

I{.

ESSAY

The First Continental Congress

15 ·

MUSIC

"

"

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Gently" Fall the Dews of Eve

By the Glee Class S '. amuel B. Greene "A' ." delaid e 1. Briggs ennie E. Seaman " . " Louise Daniels "J . " .

16.

ORATION

American 01'a/ory

17,

*ESSAY

The Love of Children

18.

*ESSAY

Floren" Nightingale

19·

ESSAY

The Outlook From Thi! Day

20.

"'ESSAY

ne, Explorers of the Mississippi Yalley

Emma E. CUltrng

21.

*ESSAY

Ida Willis Little Country Schools L'll " MCoSmfort and H ealth in School Arrangements L a l . afford

22.

*ESSAY

23,

ESSAY

Coral Formations

*ESSAY

The Power of Kindness

Alice Young Em~a K;cttne~'

25·

"'ESSAY .

From April to July

26.

ESSAY

Thomas Arnold of Rugby

I ,," "" , attie La Grange

ESSAY

V I de

Street Arabs, with the Yaledictory

( Th

e a e .c tory only to be read) Carrie E. Parker By the Gl~c Class

28.

:VIUSIC

A ngel ClwruJ j"01n "Eli"

Address by the Principal

29· 30. 3 1 . 3 2 .

Presentation of Diplomas by Hon. N K H I

R

d A

a I

j

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epons an - nnouncemcnts

Doxology and Benediction 'The reading of the essays indicat d b making t~e c:,ercises too long. e

h"

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y t 18 mar k

IS omitted to prevent

StandLog III the class is not indicated b hi' 111 the order of arrangement.

y t e se ectlOn o f essays to be read, nor

25

IDqr ~rutnr

CO LORS Gold and White

FLOWER Yellow Rose

MOTTO Semper Fidelis

(!Hallll ®t1lrl'fa

President Vice-President

SAMUE L F. KING CORA C. KAUTH GEORGE GANNON

Secretary Treasurer

GERTRUDE CARNEY

Valedictorian MantLe Orato1' H isto1'iau Prophet P-resentation oj G-iJt

RUTH COCHRAN

RUTH J AMES HELEN B ROWN RA Y::VlO~D KRULL FLORENCE J\I.BERGER

27

§rttwr QTlaaa

A-F

RUTH ABBOTT FLORENCE ALBERGER l'vIILDRED ANDERSON JESSIE ARMOUR BERN ICE AUSTlN ANNIE ATKINSON LOU ISE BAMBAM CHARLOTTE B ANGERT PEART. BARNEY GERTRUDE BATES GRACE B,\ UMHOFER

THEO CAUDELL RUTH CLARK B ESSIE COAN

RUTH COCHRAN ALICE C01<"RAN CATHERTNE COLLTNS IRENE CONNORS MJ\RY CORCORAN VEVA CORNWE LL ETHEL CORSETT CATHERI NE COUGHLIN

SARAH B EACH ETTA BECKER LORETTA BECKER FRANCES BEGGS FANNIE BLACKNEY G EORGIA BLECKLY ANNIE BOARDMAN ANNA BODINE • CLi\ltA BORDWELL KATHERINE BOLT iVIARY BON NET SARAH BOOTH KATH ERINE BOWEN KATHLEEN BOYD BLANCHE BREMER ALICE BRELOS IDA BRODIE ISABEL B.ROOKS HELEN BROWN iVIILDR ED BUGMAN VIOLET BURLEY IvIrLDRED CALKINS REnA CARMER

ELLA COURNAN J OSEPHINE Cox IVIARY COYLE FRANCES CURRY BLANCHE DAHN DELIA DAHN BERN ICE DAVIS EMMA DAVIS SELTEE DAVIS ANNIE DAVI SON

D OROTH Y DELAHUNT LENORE" DELAHUNT EDWARD DREW FLORENCE DWYER F LORENCE ECKHART ANNA EISERT AGNES FINEGAN IVIARY FITZPATRICK LI NA FOWLER " MAY FRAME CARRIE FREEMAN EMMA FRJ CK SARA H F RIEDMAN ESTHER FUNK

,

GERTRUDE CARNEY lVI ARTHA CARROLL

28

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~tutnr QIlu!i!i

G- O

ANNIE GAM~\GE GEORGE GANNON KATHERINE GATLEY l\ifARION GALLOP IRENE GORG ES KATHLEEN GRAVES ROSI NA GRETH ROSE GRODZINSKY \OVILHEUt:JNA GUESS ELSIE BAFFA NIARION HAMLEN MARGA RET H AMPTON ·CLARA· HARDEL FRJ\NCES H i\RMONY ADA HART BEATRICE HART GRACE HOBSON ETHEL HaHN lvIILDRED HUBBARD HELEN H U:\,T FRANCES HURLEY

RAYMOND PRATT KRULL FLORENCE KUCH DOROTHY LADuE

WhRI AM LAKE ACNES LATTA INEZ LAVAN

HELEN LEAHY FLORENCE LIEB FLORENCE L ONG ESTELLE LUTZ ISABELLA MACDONALD EMI LV :VlACH EMER IDA lVIAcNAUGHTON HELEN MAN·EY ACN ES NL-\SON FLORENCE 1vIENZIES ETHEL iVIERRILL MARGARET METZGER JENNIE 'vhNNICK ELLEN MOCKLER MARY MOHAN TERES/\ NIoHAN ARLIE I\10RTON LILLIAN lvIUGLER lvIAR Y :'VIULLANEY EUNICE :'vIuRPHY ALICE McAvoy FRANCES McAvoy ETHEL MCCONKEY SAVILLE MCCONNELL BLANCH R lVIcGJ!AN JULIA McGOWAN LORETTA MCQUADE lvIABLE r'

o I <.J

EDITH HYMAN LORA J ACOBS ADA J AMES JENNIE J AMES RUTH J AMES NORA J OSLI N COR" KAUTH

?vIARY KEIRAN LENA ' KEMP:\,ER LEILAH KILLALEE SAMUEL KING

GLADYS KOPENIIAFER STEPHEN KOWALSKI CARL KRANZ EDNA KRAUSE LORETTO KREBS

AN::-.J:A O'BRIEN ACNES O ' D AY

3 0

ii

!I.I ill·

1'1·

P- z

j\/IARY PERKINS R UTH PHE LPS FLORENCE POMEROY RACHEL POWELL J ESSIE P RICE EI.SIE RAIN M /\R]ORIE R ANSOM CORNELIA RAYMOND ELLEN REAM GERTRUDE REGAN FLORENCE REINER l-'IELENA REUTER CLARA ROBUINS jVIABEL ROBJN SON VIRGINIA ROBINSON FLORENCE -ROGI NSOX JOSEPHI NE ROONEY RUBY ROSE Lucy ROWLAND PEARL RUTH EDNA SAY LES EVELYN SCHAE r-ER ELLA SCHREI N ~R NORA SHEAHAN ANNA- SHIFFER ENS L~\-UR~ SKIFF AMY SLATESTOlS'E l\JIARGUERITE SMALL CLIFFORD SMITH :NIABEL SMITH l\1ILDRED STAFF

VINA STEVENS F LORENCE STEWART H E LEN STIM r~I NCER CORA STO~E lVI ARIE STRAHA:-J HENRIETTA STRAUB CATHERINE SUI.LIVAN HELEN TAIT GRETCHEN TEFFT lV! ARGUERITE THACHER EDITH THOMAS LOIS THURSTON F. B ENJAMIN Tll\'lM TERESA T YRRELL LuCY VANALSTINE LUCIE \VAHL ALICE \\.TALKE R L ENORA \VALK ER NIARJORIE VVAIU NG ROSE VVEIDEMILLE R EMILY WEILAN D HAZEL \\1 HIT£: ALICE \VHITM E R F ANNIE \VlIITTF.MORR ANNA 'VVILLSON EDITH \VOLF FRANCES VVRI GHT BRUNHILD,\ ZACHER ANTHONY ZI ENTOWS Kl VIRG[NIA ZIMMER

N I p..

3

3 2

IDqt 'rt!it~tuf!i ,A~~rt!i!i Friend.s, it is !flY pleasant privileg.e to welcome you to Our Cia Day ~xerclses whlc!' form ~he conclUSIon of our work at this schoo~ ThIs Is ·a gala day In our lIves: We ar~ .honored to have you with us and we ask you to enter Into the spmt of the day. This is ou day for reviewing ·the past and predicting the future. Here w~ have spent two happy, busy years preparing for one of the noblest professions. Among the pleasantest of associations we have striven to master the art of ·imparting knowledge and to model our educa. tion to best fit it for this service. 'vVe are about to receive the reward of persistent endeavor, and as we look back we realize how enjoyable it has all been. The labors and cares are overshadowed by the pleasures, and we know now ho~· ·splendidly worth while these cares really were. Here we have had the help of our kindest and most sympathetic COun_ sellors, the teachers; and we have been assisted by faithful and helping schoolmates. We may say everything has conspired to make these years the pleasantest and most fruitful of our lives. Physi cally, we are about to sever these ties of friendship and as– sociation, but the memory of these days will always be with us, to cheer the tired and faltering and guide us all in the right paths. A word -about ourselves. vVe are the largest class in the history of the school. We are a cosmopolitan class. In our ranks are the descendants of many peoples that have helped to build our country; each bringing its own ideals to be welded into the national spirit; the gQod to be preserved, the unworthy to be eliminated. Here we h ave established our standard; shall we be able to maintain it? I feel that our work here has been but the preface to the class h istory which the future will dictate, and I hope that every succeed– ing chapter may be an insp iring one. Will you permit me, class– mates, to offer you a word of advice by means of a sto ry I once read. Two country gentlemen met on the road one day and, after the customa ry greetings, Farmer Jones asked F armer Brown how his dimghter ' had succeeded in the civil service examinations. "vVa l," said Brown, "I reckon she failed again. The gove rn– ment don 't seem to want her nohow." "That 's three times she took them examinations, " observed Jones , "What seems to be the trouble?" " \Val," continued the other, "she seems to be a little short on arithmetic, and her grammar was a little rusty, and her spelling wan't according to Webster. No, I reckon t he government just won't have her." "That's too bad," replied his friend, "what's she going to do now?" "Oh," said Brown, "I reckon she' ll have to go to teaching school again." 34

s. F. KING, Prnident

i I

Friends, it is just this spirit that has caused infinite harm to our profes sion; even today it is difficult to remove from the popular mind the notion that teaching offers opportunities to those who have made fai lures in other vocations. . During the pas t year dea til has taken from us three of OUr beloved teachers, Mr. Mischka, Miss Gibson and Miss Huson. They spent many years here laboring for the advancement of their high calling and, by their lives as well as by their teachings, inspiring all who knew them with a sense of what our profession means. We mourn their loss and as each of us pays a tribute to their faithful service, it will be as one voice saying, "They were builders." During its course, the Class of 1912 has seen many changes of importance to the schooL The established courses have been strengthened and two new departments organized. A Faculty_ Student Council has been formed to insure a more cordial and sympathetic reia tion between teachers and students. Best of all a new and more commodious building for the school has been prom: ised. These with many other changes we have witnessed and accepted as natural things. But what a volume of work they represent! What energy and thoughtfulness they show! The Class of 1912 is indeed fortunate to have had its tra ining in the midst of these events. It is more fortunate in having as a leader in this progressive movement the man who has made possible the great things promised the Buffalo Normal School. I refer to our Princi– pal, Mr. Upton. Friends, once more I bid you welcome, and I hope you will take with you many pleasing remembrances of the June Class of 1912. SAMUEL F. KING Nillrtrrll (lJlUrlur - il. N. ~. Music, "The Brave Old Oak" 1 Oh, ten score and more, are ranked in OUf corps, As we stand in full array OUf hearts beat the time, fo r this step in our climh, On our glorious gala day. "Ve now hear t he call, which beckons us all To mark the coming year- By leaving the rule of our dear old school, Our Alma l\1ater dear. Chorus. So all hail to the class, our loya l class \\Those wa.tchword is "success!" And we'll all swell t he strain into one refrain, "Nineteen twelve- B. N. S." II Ou r flower is the rose, the y ellow rose, T he emblem of our zeal By ties we arc bound, which may deeply be found 'Neath the wearing of the" Seal." As we now ta ke our leave, let us not stop to grieve, Let us make Old No rmal ring. For our sale hope and aim is to honor the name Of Her to whom we cling- So all hail to the class, our loyal class \:Vhose watchword is " su ccess! " And we'll all swell the strain into one long refra in . "Ni neteen twelve-B. N. S." SAVILLE NIcCONNELL

CORA C. KAUTH f/ ice-Presider. t

GEORGE E. GANNON SecretafY

GERTRUDE B. CARNEY Treasurer

37

.

'he future. The only way you can requite

,

awaIt you III t

h

'

aph well and to "clean it

Lal ved Juniors,

,

I'S to use t e mlmeog r

,

genC::lostty

....- 0

yOU have finished." I know that your hearts beat with delig,ht. L.·.. ·-~ h mere mention of substttut\llg'h 01 while scores of questions are pass\llg t'stear t in the morning tdo Y?furr :c a : d~ anything with t he children? Wha t you 'd " I won er t h' I don't know ? gh your ~"n " > What shall r do if t hey ask me somet lUg , ' h the principal be h~e~ i ce we wefe given in School Eco~omy a~o utffd ~al~~g ~~e .hat was tha t a, . chool and the mormng stat ts 0 Ne. • • bo ~II You arnve at the s 'd " the graceful twist of her half, ..,ul~n ,,:;:h the" Sub." bef~ l'e the:a~r~t a b:t;~~~lvi ng in their minds some act lid, perhaps her belt pm, or, h ' t" And to test your knowledge, ataad> In~. ' ' I h are" to try er a u ' . f ' k . h'd with whlc 1 t ey d' rttl hand and the owner a I t as s, IIUle 1 . bl doub t up goes a 1rty Ie, " • bleh the)' i n va n~ y ~,~, "Can a hen lay duck's eggs? I ' am today, Ot . h "'hI' don t ,t r h'ld has fo rtified himself w,t gum, , I f lunch every c , I I' 'f the noon ;nterva or h ',th" At length !:iC )00 I S ." tef h' "to plague teac er w . , und)', squawkers or somet JUi~ the questions which you asked in the mornm g ; out and you go home, ans~e r if h' d Y could but be blotted from my memory. "0 what a mesS I made of It , I t 18 h a s about it That principal is a regular • t the Norma ever ear' Id I my I h pc no one up a f' ..,ads ? I wish he wou ose o Wh d id he notice t hose ew pa pet ' , 1 " old bear, y, ld ' t send my estimate up to the Norma, clrd so tha t he COli n . I h first attempt, After a few days d · late ! ThiS was on y ted But why so Isconso. d' .h first money vou ever ca rne , , hem troller's office an receive t e J )OU !itep Into t e . ~ ~ t earned money you will ever get. and probably the )ar es, D' rtment we resign, firs t of all, t he , 'the KlOdergarten cpa , . ' 1 To the J urHors In , . ' .h cu boards in order as conSCientIOUS Y cart of Dick, also t he pnvilege of k{cpm g ~ ~est P we leave to you" a big voice for I \'our predecessors have done. ast an , h " h" ~ t e marc . h 'I ft to your tender care a group k' department t ere tS e 'BI "t I n the d 1 essma mg "J ne " " Bedelia ", ((Sophie otz, , e c. celebrities known to outselves as N[ary a 'h 'Il reward theil pa tience drap e t heir sylphlike fo rms we hope t at you ~' 'We ad- When you .' sideratton as these virtues ins pI re. and long sufTenng With such, coo d "D I Cl ansers" in your efforts to keep b ammate ute 1 e f h monish you to ecome as h 'lformation-now or t e I '¥ I 0 surrender to you t e 11 ' f the kitchen spot ess, yea S b 'l.l'·n one cubic cennmeter 0 d I h are 100000 aCI I I first ti me announce -t )at t efe , milk, . ' . the lathe must be oi.led and the · tools \Ve remind the boys that III t he shop . t' our brillian t record I h ed not only to mam am lharpened, T hey are a so C arg I ~ I ' p'rit which has always been as basketball players, bu t also to foster tha t c llva n c s 1 the pride of the Normal boys, d our Normal days will be over. The A few more words, another song, an d d thcm and our existence C 'II " h t hers which have pr<;ce e , 'I h lass of 191 2 WI JOIIl teO Th curtain which vet s t e d b d 'n be only a memory, e d as an undergra · uate 0 Y WI N t hing remains to be one, future has been held aside for a few fortunate ones, 0 ."

flaullr OOratinu T HE myriad-minded Shakespeare says, "IvIen 's evil manners live in their virtu es we write in water." This, however, will scarcely be applicaille to the Class of 1912, for we arc certain t hat OUT virtues are deeply en. graved in the hearts of our-selves, if not in the hearts of the Class of 19 1 3. My young friend s, youth and frivolity have bee n yours. But we begin to see the marks of age approaching, N ext September you will be bending under the weight of respons ibility which belongs to t he "grave old Senior." Then, as YOU reHect on your innocent Freshman days, you will exclaim with the apostle, "When r was a child, r spake as a child , r thought as a child, But when r became a man, I put away childish things. " In o rder tha t you may then the more easily walk in wisdom '$ ways, we feel it our duty to ins truct you in this difficult task: We resign to you the privilege of occupying the middle section of ·seats in the cha pel which we have graced with so much d ignity. We are sure that you have profited by our good example. As we rel inquish our places to you we assure yOll that this position will enable you t he better to look at our distinguished faculty. It is with sorrow t hat we leave with you a hos t of books which have been our constant companions by day and the torture of our d reams by nigh t,- Chubb, Thorndyke, M cl\tlurry, James, Fiske, etc. \rVhen you seek wisdom from these sages, remember to keep them one night only from the sacred precincts of the library, for if you infringe upon tl~is law, unhappy will be your fate when called upon in the recita tion a nd t he confession is drawn from you, '~ I can' t draw books for two weeks," Our imaginations picture you conferring outside the grade room doors about those mo rning exercises which you must conduct, or rehearsing that terrible music lesson which comes next on the program, Do no t let these trials weigh too heav ily upon your youthful shoulders, Remember that weak knees and trembling voices are essenti al eleme nts to your success . As departing Seniors we are managing our funds economically, that 'oVe may purchase and bequeat h to you a patent eraser cleaner, Then there is the mimeograph, that dear old mimeograph, How we hate to leave it! ,"Vhat joy it was when our critic teachers a nnou nced, "The Latin teachers may mimeograph t he third chapter from Caesar to be t ransl ated in class tomo rrow," 01', "Arithmetic tcachers may mimeograph the examinat ion tonight; fifty copics will be enough," Then when we scampered down the hall, each one t rying to be the first a t work, that spacious room would be occu pied already by a score of girls, all tryi ng to work at the same time, Imagine the pleasant r.ours spent in waiting · un t il your turn came, (That waiting t ime will now be yours.) But we made splendid use of it to discu ss our classes, the teachers upstairs, and that delightful feature of our work known as criticisms. All of. these plea su res~

"I

39

but to surrender this last symbol of are to take the places We vacate.

our underg'raduate existence

A year .ago our class became custodian of this gay I h" h to you A, . d I ' e w IC We n . s we 0 ~o, et us urge upon you a full realization ' iemember the glorIOUs traditions which have gathered ~f ~ts sIgnIficance t Ie hundreds who have gone before and strive to rival thei:ro~n ~ It, R,emembe; to Our ~lma Nlater. \Ve put down the burden which we h:v~l ts t~ bn ng glOf) year. You take it up to carry for another. Carrv it w car: Ied the past and when the time shall come for you to join us ~ in th ell" add to Its traditions may you be able to say, "\Ve too have do .' fe gleat body of Alumni ollr fair Normal." " ne Out mlte or the glory of OUr own' , ~w ,pass 011

~nttg

Tune-"Jolly Boating Weather"

I. A song to Buffalo Normal, Loudly her praises ring; As favored sons and daughters Our tribute of love we sing. CHORUS Hail! Buffalo Normal , Thy standard of light unfold" All hail! Buffalo Normal ' With thy colon of black and gold"

II. A song to Buffalo Normal Sing it both loud and c/ear–

Fairest of all the fair Ones Dearest of all the dear. '

Ill. To thee, dear Alma rvlater Thy children though sca;tcred far Ever will sing thy praises, Till they echo from star to star.

Lucy K" CLARK

40

1 nee and pay homage at her imperial court. Never more bright than when as enlors 1912 crowne S . d

content to ca

found all was not smooth sailing, Day by day we were confronted by knott problems such as we had never d reamed of. When we were asked to consid Y how to gain the interest and attention of t wenty young charges whose min~r were directed elsewhere, ho"" to cultivate the gentle art of questioning, and ho 8 to increase the quantity of gray ma tter of our pupils,-all these things divcSt~ us of any undu e conceit we might have had. \>Vhcn no longer Freshmen, but as Seniors, we returned in September, OUr numbers were increased by the addition of twelve Training Class students who had heard of our fame and decided to join us. Our Senior year has been saddened by the death of three members of the Faculty, Mr, Mischka, Miss Gibson and Miss Huson, The loyal and untirin~ devotion of these beloved teachers to their profession, the cheer and warm-hearted. ness which radiated from their lives, have made a deep and lasting impression on all who knew them. We were also called upon to mourn the loss of one of our Own number, Mildred Whatford, a girl whose- sweet, lovely spi rit will always live in our memories, .:vIany grave res ponsibilities came to us with the privileges of the Senior Class, those privileges which we as Freshmen, had longed for. It would take t he genius of a Dante to depict in proper colors tha t first day of teaching, Indeed we question whether martyrs in the Roman arena ever suffered such anguish as did we in those brief but endless moments in which we struggled to pu t into practice at the same time all the methods ever advocated by McMurry or approved by Chubb, Cer– tainly we know that no returning conqueror was ever fil1ed with a greater sense of triumph than we, when. we had filled in those lengthy minutes allotted to the reci tation. Not least among our many actIVIties were the dramatic productions which displayed the versatility and accomplishments of ou r class. It was on St. Patrick's Da y during our Freshman year that we made our first bow upon the stage in the presen ta tion of the charming little play, "The Land of Heart's Desire. Jl Other noteworthy performances foll owed , particul arly those of Thanksgiving and the Dickens' centennary, when lhe assembly hall was converted into a veritable metropolitan auditori um. On those occasions the a rt of our amateurs, to our judgment at least, was rivalled only by that of a Mantell or a Barrymore, and the masterly management might have aroused the envy of a Frohman. "fhe great red letter day of the school came when the winter was nearly over, February 29th, that day on which Governor D ix signed the bill appropriating $100,000 to begin work on t he new building, will long be remembered by the students, Who will ever forget those speeches by the Faculty, or the way the old walls re-echoed with cheers and songs? Later events of t he win te r were the cha rming Nlillinel'Y and Dressmaking Teas when the girls wo re the hats a nd gowns made in class. Everyone admitted on these occasions that the outlook for America to originate her own fash ions ·is very promising. One of the occasions with which we associate happiest memories is the May Day Dance, As unimportant Fresnmen J we were willing to leave it to the more mature judgment of the Senio rs to choose and crown a queen from their own

h

~r~ ' we were

more blue or t e sun

III . 'k r • the s )

, .

queen, he last few months are so fresh in our memory that It IS hardly h most difficult and strenuous weeks of the year, ten)· oyable reception given y tea um11l. e f Mr and Mrs. Upton marked t east 0 our I. N' neteen twelve feels a deep sense of appreCIatIOn I d his corps of teachers for thclr many IllnesseS ter t e b hI' Th . h I f h h . nat t e orne 0 .. , . 5 as a c ass. I . k O d " of being the largest that has ever passed out of 0 the first time representatives 0 t e our I h also been an original class an or t erst hool has published a class book. It WIll not be I - t e sC II h hO storyof this class because nine new Faculty chums t e onor . f h f o. k f d there arc In OU I ran s 0 1 Nmeteen twe ve as J d f h fi . d'ffi f h nnmg was 1 Id be incomplete without mention of the B. N, S, Songs ?ur hi~~~rYe:~o:y the school, but contributed to by several ffi:mbers of t his rubhshed t r' d of things we have learned is well summed up III a song by a diU The mu tltu e h d' f .. c~lty membe r unnamed, but guessed from er a VIce,- Now if you, perchance, should yearn For a placc in which to learn Tnese things, which are not easy as a rule, Pray list to ou r advice (For we think it's rather nice) And join us at the Buffalo Normal School. What Normal has meant to us is told in a nother song,– Deal' Normal, this the lesson thou hast t aught uS To stand with righ t , to stand with right; Hast fi rmness, power, peace and comfort brough t us, And strength to fight, and strength to fight. And who would not li ke to join in the splendid cho rus ?– Buffalo Normal, prospered may she be Buffalo Normal, the only one for me ! Let's sou nd her praise with ringing zest For she's t he one we love the best, . h" complete We do not As a class in the Normal School our Istory IS now ' . , , I I d we boast that ou r career wIil dam) to have accomphshed unusua resu ts, nor 0 d d . '1 W h tied to maintain the stan ar bring unusual honor to our Alma hater. eave r of the school at all times and to be loyal in spirit and in deed, May t he same lofty purpose animate us in our individual careers. HELEN I. BROWN The affai rs of t Af . II them 2r" to rcea 'came at a roos ttle relaxatIOn I"htrul reccpuo • h' .II gat enng .. de to our PnncIpa an ke our school life a happy one. I J ~ndeavors to, rna h h I Our c ass rmal, an. h· tail within the past few years, an t 1elr e- tmbers have JOlne t e oteac 109 IS h' o 'nterwoven WIth our c ass lstory. . ...-H ..... ~.. I • J ~ral1LU

43

'j

3Juutnr . allull5

.\1ARY BLOOMST EIN HELEN RUCK LEY BERNICE CLARK wIA RGARET CORRIDON GENEVIEVE DALY lV[ARY D OMBROSKY lVIARION EATON JRMA FARNSWORTH IvI ARGARET FLY:">JN LOUIS E H ESS FRANCES LAPORTE ELIZABETH LITTLEFI EI.D .VI ABEl L ONG RUTH wlcANVLTY

CAROLINE IVlcCo,u:u ISABEL l\fcLAUGHLIN BEATRICE N EWTON EDITH RHODES ELIZABETH ROSA KATHRYN SCANLAN ORPIIA SCHULTZ RUTH SEITZ

FLORENCE SHAW BERTHA STRUBING CORA SITONE EDNA ULMER BESSIE I\VARREN

44

@'npqnmnrr OJinaa

"

A-F

VIOLA DAVIS AHBOTT STELLA A. ANDREWS EDNA ' B AKER PAULINE BAKER BEATRICE BEALE JEANNETTE BENDER NIuRIEL BENEDICT STELLA B. BIERCE

EVELYN Tv1. CORCORAN WIll,DRED CORNELL FLORENCE ]. COWLEY GRACE COX GERTRUDE HELEN COYLE ELIZABETH CUNNINGHAM ANNA DAMATTIO MABEL DENZEL EDITH M. D ERRY HERBERT G. DE VINEY EMILY ';Yo D IXSON ELIZA MAY DRAKE CHARLEE ELIZABETH DVCER SYLVIA EDNA DYMOND CHRISTI NE E. EASTLAND !VIILDRED ' EISS NIAUDE ELLIOrr AMANDA K. ENGLUND J AMES ' E. F.ARRELL EVA 1. FERRY LYDIA FI NGER ANASTASIA Fr NK ANN /\ \'1. FITZG ERALD CATHERINE J. FITZGERALD :VL\RGARET C. FORSYTH iVIAR Y 1\/r. FRASER NL\RGARET F ELL ROSF. F ERN BACH

ROSEMARY BILL CELIA M. BLEY SOPHIA W. BLIVEN NlILTON CLARENCE BLOWERS FRED. \VARREN BOLENDER KATIIF.RINE G. BOWMAN ANASTATT/\ BRADY ·HAZEL CATHERINE BROWN '-'GERTRuDE H. BURDEN ELIZABETH ' BURKHARDT ·MARY F. BURNS VINCENT A. CARBERRY lVL.\RY. CHADOT RU;rH BAKER CHAMBI::RLIN MARION H. CHAS E ALICE G. CL,' RK I SABEL CLARK LUCY K. CLARK ItuTJI EMMA Cr,EMENTS ELIZAB'!:;TI-I COLWELL

II

G- -P

OLIVE GEDEOHN :NIARIE GEOGHEGAN LEONA GmBS PHILLIP GILRAY MARIE A. GLAUDER CHARLO~TE A, GREENWOOD FLQRENCE HALL :NIARY TRES-:'- HAMELMAN MAY L. HANDY SARAH J. HARRIS GEORGIA HATHAWAY OLIVE HAYES CATHERINE HENEL MARY C. HILL I-tENRIETTA HOPKINS KATl-rARINE M. HUCKER BEULAH HUNTER ELEANOR IRLBACHER ELSIE EVELYN JOHNSON JOSEPHINE JunGE ELLEN A. KEICHER RUSSELL KEPPEl. KATHLEEN KILCOYNE ELOISE KLEITZ GERTRUDE KNICKENBERG l\!IATTlE H: KREHBIEL GLADYS E. LANSILL

1vlARGARET ELLEN LARKIN RUTH E. LEE

II

JOHN A. L IVI NGSTON JOHN J. :VlcCARTHY ARTHUR

J. McDONNELL J. McDONNELL

THOMAS

ALICE McKAY TERESA McMAHON KATHLEEN l\IIcTAGUE MICHAEL J. MAHER MARIE M. MAZUROWS KI HARRIET BERNICE MERRtFrE_LD FI.ORENCE G. MIKULSKI GRACE E. MILLER LEVI HARMON MINER MAY MURPHY

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FLORENCE lVI. N ELLIST MARY E. O'DONNELL DELIA M. OTT IN EZ S. PARKER GERTRUDE ~VI. PECK IvIARY LOUISE PERFIELD JANE A. PETERSON MAY PHTLLIPS GENEVI EVE L. POMEROY RUTH E. PRAY

R-Z

ELLA C. R AFFAUF E L siE ~\il. REGAN TvL4. RGUERITE REGAN ELLA B. REHBERG EDITH: 1\;1. RElLErN AGNES B. R EIMANN FLORENCE E. REPP

I DA C. SPERBER lVL\RIE CECILIA STAFFORD L AURA M. STETSON GERTRUDE B. W. STOESSER H ELEN A. STRATMEIER :\I1A8£L L. STRUBI NG JOSEPH F. SUL LIVAN EDN/\ TvI. SUMMERS ALICE C. TA V L OR LUELLA T EFFT FLORENCE E. THOMPSON ESTHER THUM CAROLINE THURSTON EDITH V A LLELY HELEN GERTRUDE \JVALKER ELEA NOR E. '''A LLEN MILDRED LOIS \VARNE R UTH G. WHVT OCK

HELENA R EUTER A LICE R. RI EMAN FLORE~CE rvIARGARET R ICGS M ILDRED R OCERS SHIRLEY J EANETTE ROSENAU RUTH MARY ROUNDS RUTH ROWLEY E VELYN E. RUSSELL COLETTE' F. RVAN ALTA S. SAGER

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KORMA R. SC!iAEFER ALMA E. SCHELBACH ] AMES L. SU F.A GERTRUDE S HEPIiERD ,LOUISE A. SIEKMANN TERESA . S IRDEVAN ADAH B. SAIITII OLGA LOUISE SMITH

H AZEL \ V I CKHAM F. EDITH VVILKIE

ELEANOR M , W,LSON LAURA , F. "VO ELFLE MARGUERITE B. \ \lOOD G LJ\ DYS L. \tVOODS CORA C. WUNT

50

i i

LOIS AK" LILLIAN IVIA y BASTIA[\

ALICE A. BRIGHAM HELEN F. BUSTE1\D ESTHER ~lARGARET COMISKEY

ETHEr. CHURCHILl , LILLIAN L. DODGt: GRACE DOOLEY HATTIE J. DUNLOP GLADYS ESTABROOK CORNELIA HILL

CLARA S. JENSEN HELENA B. KERR CATHERI)l'R B. lVlcDoNNELL FLORENCE C. IvIARZOLF :VIARY LOUISE ~/IAxwELL

ALICE M. ).;fIKULSKI GLADYS V. PARANT HELENA IVL.1RIE RECH I-I. C. VERA SCHOLZ LORETTA SELMAN PATRA Eo SHACKLETO:\i" MIl.DREn L. SIPP rvl AKION i\J. \Vl\ LLACE FLORENCE L. WELKER \1rLDRED \VHEAT

52

~rqool of ,radtrr T HE School of Practice is a regu lar city publ ic school of nine grades of fort\, children each, besid~ th~ ~indergarten which is under Stat~ manageme;t . only. Each "teacher IS cnUe of her grade) most of the teaching being done by the seniors in the Normal Department. The school was organized for the purpose of affording an opportunity for da ily observation and teachi ng of the ordinary school subjects in a regular graded public school: by those preparing to become teachers. It is not a model school, primarily, though Ill-any model lessons by experts are given. The close .supervision by the critic and _the daily conference with her serve to carry out the purpose with advan tage to both pupils and student-teachers. In September, [871, the Normal School of Practice was opened with five critic-teachers · and seats for two hundred children. Henry B. Buckham, A. M., was ·principal ex-officio and· lv1iss Flora E. Crandall was the principal for three years . She then became Mrs. Edmu nd J. Pluml ey. A woman of beautiful Chris– tian . character, :she was an ac tive church worker until her death about t~n years ago. . Her husband and son are still living in Buffalo. h. may ·be of .interest to note ·here that rvIiss Isabella Gibson, so long an honored member of the Normal Faculty) was one of these first five critics having cha rge of "the two younges t g rades . " Miss Ada M·. Kenyon was then promoted to the principalship . Afte r several years she went to ·the Central H igh School, and her recent dea th ended a long and useful ca~eer as gu:de, l~acher and friend of the hundreds who ·came under her su pervision there. Miss Anna K. Eggleston, a g raduate of the Normal Departmen t , was next principa l for one year, when she became method-teacher and head critic in the Normal..' Later, sh.e was State Lectu rer at teachers' institutes. As Mrs·. Carl K. Friedni an., in het beautiful horne life she still teaches and inspires by her very presence and pcrsol1ali ty. Miss AdelIa F. Fay was then principal for two years. Soon after she Jeft us she became di rector of physical training in th e city public schools. She retired after several years and is living a quiet though busy life at home here in"Buffalo. . Miss Franc. E. Oliver was t hen principal for a short time. She went to Springfield, Mass., and from there to her present position in a large boys' school in Philadelphia. IVIr·. L. W. Lake, an ex-school commissioner, was then appointed. At the end of a ye-ar he resigned to enter his present business in H amburg, N . Y.

I I, I' "

54

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