Campus Commons PT - April 2020

CAMPUS COMMONS

HOWMY GRANDFATHER STILL INFLUENCES ME TODAY CARING FOR THE COMMUNITY, HOWEVER HE COULD

We’ve all got that one person who we wish we were more like. For me, that person was, and still is, my grandfather. While I can see the ways I am not my grandfather, I still try to emulate some of his characteristics to this day. He impacted a lot of people throughout his life, and I would honestly be happy to be just half the man he was by the end of my life. Nelson Eddy lived in the town of Courtland along the Sacramento River for much of his life. He was a pilot in WWII, and flew on several missions over China and Burma. After the war, he owned an electric and pump business that focused on the needs of local farmers and residents along the river. None of this may seem particularly unique, and after the war, I’m sure his life looked pretty ordinary by many standards. What made my grandfather so special to me and so many others was this: He lived to serve the people around him. My grandfather was someone who loved to tell stories. He would tell stories about the war, about living in the Delta, about his trips to Lake Tahoe, and his family. Whenever he talked, people just gravitated to him. He was one of the few people I would never grow tired of listening to. He always had me hanging on every detail. He just had a natural confidence

that made him an amazing conversationalist. It’s what made him so great at helping people, as well as telling stories. A few years before my grandfather passed, a local historian recorded him talking about his history and life in the Delta. I have copies of some of those recordings, and I still listen to them every now and again, just to hear my grandfather’s voice tell a story. I don’t know how he had the time, but somehow my grandfather managed to work and also be incredibly present and active in his community. He loved where he lived, and he showed it in his service to others around town. Throughout his life, he was the owner of Eddy Electric, a founder of the town’s church, an active leader in the local Boy Scout troop, a volunteer for the fire department, a member of many clubs in the area, and someone who would always answer the phone to help a local resident in need. Anywhere he saw a need, he sought to address it. And for all the ways that he helped, it was never a source of pride for him. He always stayed humble. “WHAT MADE MY GRANDFATHER SO SPECIAL TO ME AND SO MANY OTHERS WAS THIS: HE LIVED TO SERVE THE PEOPLE AROUND HIM.”

I always knew a lot of people loved and respected my grandfather, but I didn’t get the full picture until his memorial service in 2002. The room was packed with people out the door. There weren’t enough seats, and all the standing room was taken up as well. I don’t know that I’ll ever measure up to him as much as I would like, but I can try. I’m not as much a natural conversationalist as my grandfather was. I’m more reserved, and a lot of people have told me to smile more often. I don’t have that expressive personality that draws people in easily. While I acknowledge this shortcoming in myself, it’s my hope that one day my kids will have the same magnetic personality he did. At Campus Commons PT, I try to emulate the way my grandfather put the needs of others before his own when I help patients from all ages and walks of life within our community. While my work might not put my name on a building, I’m satisfied knowing I’m serving the community just like my grandfather once did.

–Mark Eddy

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THE AGE OF STRESS It’s hard to imagine kids as anything but carefree, happy, and eager to explore the world around them. However, children experience stress just like adults do, which can severely impact their typically cheerful dispositions. Since April is National Stress Awareness Month, now is an opportune time to familiarize yourself with tools and information that can help you alleviate your child’s stress.

HELPING YOUR CHILD OVERCOME ANXIETY

from the people around them. According to KidsHealth.org, younger children may also pick up habits like twirling their hair or sucking their thumb, while older kids may start to bully others, lie, or rebel. According to KidsHealth.org, good nutrition, proper rest, and healthy attention are great ways to help kids manage their stress. Set time aside each day to talk and spend time with your children; talking about worries will reduce or relieve anxieties. If you know about an upcoming stressful situation, like a school exam or a health checkup, prepare your child by studying with them or talking to them about what to expect.

WHAT ARE THEIR STRESSORS?

Any number of everyday factors can lead to stress, and stress can plague anyone who feels overwhelmed. Toddlers and young children going to day care or school for the first time may experience separation anxiety due to being apart from their parents. Older kids and teenagers may feel mounting social and academic pressure. Even something as simple as overhearing loved ones arguing or seeing a sad news report can add to a child’s stress levels.

Don’t stop here. For more tools and information regarding stress reduction in children, visit KidsHealth.org or contact your doctor.

HOW DO I KNOW IF MY CHILD IS STRESSED?

When a kid is stressed, they will exhibit odd behavior and even undergo physical changes. Depending on your child’s age, watch for mood swings, changes in sleep patterns, headaches, trouble focusing, or withdrawal

3 TIPS FOR COMPLETING YOUR AT-HOME EXERCISES STAYING DILIGENT WHEN NO ONE IS LOOKING

CHECK THE CALENDAR

It’s easy to exercise when you have your physical therapist guiding you throughout the entire process. But when it comes to the home exercises they prescribe you, it’s probably a lot harder to hold yourself to the routine. Don’t worry, you’re not alone. One study found that adherence to at-home exercise routines among physical therapy patients could be as low as 35%. Those exercises are important to the healing process, so how can we be better at holding ourselves accountable to the routine? Here are a few suggestions.

While many people may insist they don’t have time to do their at-home exercises, what they usually mean is they don’t make time for it in their routines. It’s hard to throw another check box on our daily to-do list, but if you take some time to examine your calendar, you’ll probably find that you have plenty of opportunities to squeeze a few exercises in.

FIND A PT YOU LIKE

This might seem inconsequential, but finding a physical therapist you connect with can motivate you to complete your exercises at home in order to please them. At the same time, it’s also easier to be honest about your progress (or lack thereof) completing your at-home exercises with your physical therapist if they’re someone you like. If you come to Campus Commons Physical Therapy, we know you’ll find a physical therapist to connect with and motivate you toward your goals. If you have any questions about what we offer, give us a call at 916-927-1333, or visit our website at CampusCommonsPhysicalTherapy.com.

HAVE A GOAL-CENTERED MIND

It’s difficult, if not impossible, to maintain an exercise routine just for the sake of having the routine. When it comes time in your day to do your exercises, wherever you are, keep your goals in mind. What do you want to happen as a result of going through physical therapy? Whether it’s playing with the grandkids more or running a marathon this fall, use that goal to motivate you toward your at-home exercises.

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STAYING SAFE ON THE TRAIL THREE WAYS TO AVOID HIKING INJURIES

Spring is finally here, and that means blue skies and abundant sunshine are once again calling hikers to the trails. If you’re an outdoor enthusiast, it’s almost impossible to resist the siren song of the paths beside the Sacramento River, or the trails crisscrossing 40 acres of deer habitat in the Auburn State Recreational Area. That said, nothing ruins a season of recreation like an injury, and hiking can be dangerous to your joints unless you take proper precautions. Here are a few tips to help you stay safe.

the amount of body weight your legs have to carry by as much as 17.6 pounds when you’re hiking at an incline.

KEEP AN EYE ON YOUR FEET

This may seem obvious, but there’s nothing more crucial to preventing injury on the trail than watching your step. An unseen rock can spell disaster for your ankle, hip, wrist, or shoulder if it causes you to fall or even just stumble, so make sure to take breaks from checking out the scenery to scan for dangerous stretches up ahead.

STRETCH BEFORE YOU STEP

Getting your muscles and joints warmed up before a hike is one of the best ways to prevent an injury. Seasoned hikers prefer dynamic stretches, which mimic some of the movements you might need to make on the trail. Knee lifts, squats, high kicks, torso twists, and quad stretches are all good options to get the blood flowing before you hike.

These tips will certainly help keep you safe on the trail, but sometimes injury is unavoidable. If you get hurt while hiking, our trained physical therapists are there to make your recovery as quick and painless as possible so you can get back to exploring the scenery you love. You can reach our office by calling 916-927-1333 or visiting CampusCommonsPhysicalTherapy.com.

GRAB THOSE TREKKING POLES

Trekking poles — those rubber-tipped rods with grips at the top used by serious hikers and cross-country skiers — can help mitigate the impact of hiking on your joints, particularly your knees. One study showed that using poles can reduce pressure strain in the leg by 20% and can cut

TAKE A BREAK

BEET, GOAT CHEESE, AND ARUGULA SALAD Inspired by FoodNetwork.com

This crowd-pleasing dish is sure to be the biggest hit at your next gathering. And it’s good for you, too!

INGREDIENTS

• • • • • •

1/4 cup balsamic vinegar 3 tbsp shallots, thinly sliced

• • • • •

6 cups fresh arugula

1/2 cup walnuts, toasted and chopped 1/4 cup dried cranberries or cherries

1 tbsp honey

1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil Salt and pepper to taste 6 beets, peeled and quartered

1/2 avocado, cubed

2 oz crumbled goat cheese

DIRECTIONS

1. Heat oven to 450 F and line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. 2. In a medium bowl, combine vinegar, shallots, and honey. 3. Gradually whisk olive oil into the mixture and season with salt and pepper. 4. In a small bowl, toss the beets in dressing until they are coated. 5. Place coated beets on baking sheet and roast them for 12 minutes. Set the beets aside and allow them to cool. 6. In a large bowl, toss arugula, walnuts, and berries with the remaining vinaigrette. Season with salt and pepper. 7. Top salad with beets, avocado, and goat cheese.

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INSIDE

THIS ISSUE

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How My Grandfather Still Influences Me Today

Helping Your Child Manage Stress

3 Tips for Completing Your At-Home Exercises

Keep Your Joints Safe While You Hike

Beet, Goat Cheese, and Arugula Salad

Top Mental Strategies for Your Fitness Routine

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TOP MENTAL STRATEGIES FOR YOUR FITNESS ROUTINE

Whether your New Year’s workout routine is finally embedded in your schedule or you’re still trying to make it happen, always remember that your mind is just as important as your body. On some days, you may feel like anything is possible, and on others, it may feel impossible to even get out of bed. Don’t worry, that’s totally normal! There’s no reason to feel ashamed if you’re struggling with gaining steam and motivation for your workout. Here are some mental strategies to help you get firmly into your routine this year and the years to come.

in bed. Some people will psych themselves out of working out because their time is limited, or they worry about how tired they’ll be after the workout (especially after or before a busy day). Instead of thinking of reasons you can’t or don’t want to go, focus your mind only on the task of getting there. Stepping into the gym will often give you the mental push to actually work out. It’s also best to leave the all-or-nothing mindset behind — a 45- or 55-minute workout isn’t required every single gym session. Life happens, and even if it’s a short exercise, your workout will actually energize you for the rest of your day.

Workouts will burn, and the motions may feel uncomfortable or even painful, so it’s crucial to have the grit to push yourself to the limit. Rather than give up, you should embrace the pain and see it as a sign you’re growing stronger. Adjust your inner vocabulary. Anything that seems “uncomfortable” should be reconsidered as “intense” but something you can work through. Of course, be careful of injury pains!

GETTING TO THE GYM

PUSHING YOURSELF TO THE LIMIT

What’s the hardest part of working out? For most people, it’s not the heavy weights or the long cardio sessions — it’s actually stepping into the gym. Sometimes, people will wake up and think that the gym isn’t possible that day as they lay

Studies have found that the most successful people share grit: the ability to work hard and endure even the most difficult times.

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