Northwest Austin Edition - February 2020

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION

VOLUME 14, ISSUE 1  FEB. 28MARCH 26, 2020

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ELECTION GUIDE Primary 2020

2020 Camp GUIDE

IMPACTS

THE LOCAL OUTPOST

6

SAMPLE BALLOT

CAMP LISTINGS

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14

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Measles, rubella cases could be the ‘tip of the iceberg’ Recent conrmed cases of previously eradicated, vaccine-preventable diseases have medical leaders in Austin concerned over the city’s vulnerability to potential outbreaks. On Jan. 16, the Austin Public Health Department conrmed the city’s rst case of rubella since 1999. That news came on the heels of the health department clearing Austin’s rst measles case in the same time period that was announced in December. Both of those diseases are preventable by the mumps, measles and rubella vaccine, which is required for Texas children enroll- ing in school. But nonmedical exemptions from those vaccinations—allowable by state law—have been led at increasing rates over the past decade in Austin and its surrounding cities. That leaves Austin vulnerable to an CONTINUED ON 24 BY IAIN OLDMAN 17% Recent data analysis shows the North Austin commercial real estate market grew by more than MARKET VIABILITY

Community COVERAGE

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention declared measles eradicated in the U.S. in 2000. Two decades later, cases are again on the rise nationwide. Texas is also seeing a higher number of cases of other vaccine-preventable diseases.

MEASLES The measles virus is so contagious that it infects 90% of nonvaccinated people close to an infected individual, according to the CDC.

RUBELLA Prior to 2015, Texas had not reported any cases of rubella since 2004. Rubella can cause serious birth defects in the fetus for pregnant women.

2 cases

2.0

30

27 cases

Rubella was declared eradicated in the U.S. by the CDC in 2004.

20

1.0

10

0

0

MUMPS The mumps virus is spread by droplets of saliva or mucus from an infected person. In 2017, there were 470 cases of mumps reported across Texas, the highest number of cases since 1990.

PERTUSSIS More commonly known as whooping cough, pertussis occurs in three- to ve-year cycles. There were 1,765 cases in 2017—the beginning of cases in the next three- to ve-year year cycle.

3,985 cases

800 600 400 200 0

753 cases

4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0

From 2006-17, Texans aged 15-19 years had the highest average incident rate for mumps.

SOURCES: AUSTIN PUBLIC HEALTH, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES, U.S. CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

PHOTOS COURTESY U.S. CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

Retail remains at while ocemarket grows

BY AMY DENNEY

she said. “But we were doing half as much in sales [at Domain Northside].” Selbe Lasita said the owners were initially sold on the location with its outdoor patio shaded by large trees like the other locations. “We like being in a neighborhood center, some- thing that’s not a big shopping mall, so we’ll be stay- ing away from large developments,” Selbe Lasita said. For retail businesses, that lack of foot trac can be CONTINUED ON 26

When The Grove Wine Bar & Kitchen, an Aus- tin-based restaurant chain that had ve area loca- tions, suddenly closed its Domain Northside location in January, many were surprised since the restaurant had been open less than a year. Co-owner Beth Selbe Lasita said the decision came down to a lack of sales and slow foot trac, even in the popular shopping destination. “We [still] have four very successful restaurants,”

from 2015-19 by adding 1.4 million square feet of new oce space.

SOURCE: COSTAR GROUPCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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