Soto Law Group - November 2019

NOT YOUR ORDINARY TURKEY SHOOT The Crazy Case of Jacobs v. Kent

Kent had failed to follow this rule when he shot Jacobs. They also could not determine whether the doctrine of primary assumption of risk, which Kent pointed to in his defense, was even applicable. The court also called into question whether Jacobs had also been negligent. Ultimately, the case didn’t move forward.

It began like any other hunting excursion. Neil Jacobs was walking softly through the bushes, looking for a spot to hunker down and watch for a flock of turkeys. The only problem was that someone beat him to that neck of the woods. James Kent had established a hunting spot for himself, and, when he heard rustling and gobbling in some nearby bushes and saw a flash of red, he took aim and fired. Unfortunately, the movement in the bushes was not a turkey. Kent was horrified to find that he had shot Jacobs. Jacobs promptly moved for a partial summary judgment against Kent on the basis that he had failed to determine that Jacobs was not a turkey but, in fact, a human being. Kent cross-moved for summary judgment, saying Jacobs should have expected risks when he stepped into a popular hunting environment. When their case came before the Supreme Court of the 4th District of New York, the courts denied both the motion and the cross-motion. They agreed that Jacobs had assumed the inherent risks of hunting — just not the risks it would be unreasonable to assume, like getting shot by another hunter who thought you were a turkey. Beyond that, the courts did not pronounce judgment because they did not have enough verifiable facts.

Maybe next time, they should just try getting a turkey from the supermarket.

Jacobs asserted that turkey hunters should not shoot unless they can see the turkey and verify its gender. The court could not determine whether

Take a Break!

Inspired by TwoHealthyKitchens.com

If the leftovers are your favorite part of Thanksgiving, then this recipe is for you! Show your dog how thankful you are for them with these post-feast dog treats. Leftover Thanksgiving Dog Treats

Ingredients

2 cups cooked turkey, finely chopped

1/2 cup cooked sweet potatoes, plain and mashed

2 cups whole wheat flour

3/4 cup water

1 egg

Directions 1. Heat oven to 350 F.

2. In a medium bowl, combine sweet potatoes, water, and egg. Add turkey and flour and stir again until dough is thick and sticky. 3. Use a rubber spreader to spread dough evenly on parchment-lined baking sheet, about 1/2-inch thick. Cut dough into small rectangles using a knife or pizza cutter. 4. Bake for 30 minutes, until the dog treats are lightly golden brown. 5. Remove from oven and let treats cool completely. Break treats apart along score lines. 6. Serve fresh or store in refrigerator for up to two weeks.

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