AHI Newsletter Summer 2019 V2 FINAL

SUMMER EDITION

ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

Stakeholders' NEWSLETTER

Events and Media

P0

P0 Focus on TWG Members

Lindsey Drummond and Niamh Field

AHI Programme Updates P0

CellCheck BVD

Johne’s Disease IBR

Beef HealthCheck

Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27 Phone 071 9671928 | Email nmorgan@animalhealthireland.ie | Website www.animalhealthireland.ie

AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of our stakeholders.

Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27 Phone 071 9671928 Email nmorgan@animalhealthireland.ie

CONTENTS

04 05 11 12 13 16 18 19

Introduction

Events And Media

Focus on Technical Working Group Members

CellCheck

BVD

Johne’s Disease

IBR

Beef HealthCheck

Introduction

Dr David Graham, CEO, Animal Health Ireland

W elcome to the second edition of our Stakeholders' Newsletter for 2019 which presents updates on our priority programmes and other work areas, with continued activity and progress across these as described in detail in each of the reports. Change remains a constant within AHI, and this quarter has been no exception. At our Annual General Meeting in May, we welcomed two new directors to the board- Roisin Hennerty and John Malone - to replace Robin Talbot and Joe Collins, to whom we owe a great debt of gratitude for their wisdom and guidance during their time on the board. This is also a period of change within the Irish Johne’s Control Programme, with Lorna Citer, the current programme manager, stepping down shortly to return to Australia. Lorna has been PM for the past three years, during which she has worked tirelessly to deliver on the programme objectives laid down in the current (2018- 2020) Strategic Plan. As a result, she has overseen the transition from the previous pilot programme to the current position, where Phase 2 of the IJCP is established and the proportion of the dairy industry engaged with the programme is continuing to grow. On behalf of AHI and our stakeholders, a huge thanks to Lorna, and best wishes for the future. In themeantime, following a recent recruitment process, a new PM has been appointed and will be in post shortly. Another area of change is the development of activities in support of the pig sector. While our remit encompasses all livestock, to date our Strategic Plans and ensuing

activities have essentially been restricted to cattle. With the recent announcement of a pig levy to provide industry funding to match funding previously committed by DAFM, AHI has recently appointed a Pig HealthCheck programme manager, who will take up their position in the near future. In the meantime, AHI has already begun training of veterinary practitioners working in this sector on specific activities funded through the Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health (TASAH). To reflect this broadening of activities, we have redesigned the organisation’s logo, with the new version used on the cover of this report. Our current Strategic Plan also commits us to identify and address additional priority work areas for AHI in the dairy and beef sectors. In support of this objective, AHI has recently conducted a survey seeking responses from both our stakeholder organisations and individuals (farmers, vets, advisors etc.) regarding changes on farm over the past 10 years in relation to areas of AHI activity and also seeking to identify and prioritise addition work areas for AHI over the next decade. The findings from this survey will be presented at the conference being held on 23rd October in the Royal College of Physicians in Dublin to mark the 10th anniversary. This will be followed by further in-depth stakeholder consultation in advance of setting our next Strategic Plan. I look forward to seeing many of you at the conference, and engaging with you subsequently. In the meantime, enjoy the newsletter.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Events and Media

Gráinne Dwyer, Communications and Event Manager

AHI AGM The Annual General Meeting of Animal Health Ireland was held on the 9th of May in the Killeshin Hotel, Portlaoise. Included in the usual order of business at an AGM, David Graham presented updates on each of our programmes in addition to AHI Business plans. The annual report is now available on our website click here .

ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND

Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

ANNUAL REPORT

Mike Magan, Chairman of AHI with Board members Prof Michael Doherty and John O'Sullivan.

2018

Board member John Malone with Liz Lane, DAFM.

AnimalHealth Ireland,4-5TheArchways,Carrick-on-Shannon,Co. Leitrim,N41WN27 Phone 0719671928Email nmorgan@animalhealthireland.iewww.AnimalHealthIreland.ie

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Dairy Calf to Beef Open Day | NDC Open Day

Johnstown Castle Dairy Calf to Beef Open Day We attended the Dairy Calf to Beef Open Day in Johnstown Castle on the 21st of May. The farmers who visited our stand were able to discuss their Beef HealthCheck report results and parasite control queries with Natascha Meunier, Beef HealthCheck Programme Manager. NDC Open Day The NDC Open Day was on the McKenna family farm in Emyvale, Co. Monaghan on 12th of June. The McKennas are the 2018 National Winners of the NDC and Kerrygold Quality Milk Awards. The event was organised by the National Dairy Council and Teagasc, with the support of Lakeland Dairies Co-op and Ornua. Finola McCoy, our CellCheck Programme Manager was invited to attend and speak on reducing antibiotic usage and the case for selective dry cow therapy.

Paul Matthews of ABP Foods with Natascha Meunier, Beef HealthCheck Programme Manager at Johnstown Castle Open Day.

Finola McCoy, CellCheck Programme Manager with Majella McCafferty of Lakeland Dairies attending and speaking at the NDC Open Day.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Beef HealthCheck Events

Beef HealthCheck Events A series of six on-farm events were held at the end of June. AHI in collaboration with Teagasc and members of Meat Industry Ireland – ABP Food Group, Dawn Meats, Foyle Foods, Kepak, Liffey Meats and Slaney Foods were responsible for the planning and delivery of the events. Over 400 farmers attended where four topics were discussed in a two hour session. • The prudent use of antibiotics to avoid Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR). The session sought to raise awareness about responsible antibiotic usage and the role of vaccination in tackling AMR. • Pilot IBR Programme- in 2018, AHI, in collaboration with Teagasc/Irish Farmers’ Journal and the BETTER farm participants undertook to conduct a pilot IBR programme. The results and findings from the pilot programme will serve to inform a national IBR programme. • Parasite control – dosing strategy for the grazing season based on results of faecal samples, grazing management and Beef HealthCheck reports. The need to reconsider the use of dosing products to avoid resistance. • Animal Welfare- latest guidelines and legislation on disbudding, castration and other farming practices that relate to improved calf welfare.

• Further farmer engagement in relation to the Beef HealthCheck programme is scheduled for later in the year.

Images from the recent Beef HealthCheck events

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Beef HealthCheck Events

Images from the recent Beef HealthCheck events (continued)

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Beef HealthCheck Events

Images from the recent Beef HealthCheck events (continued)

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Beef HealthCheck Events | AHI Training

AHI Training Training continued under the Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health (TASAH) programme with three Johne’s disease training sessions held in Mullingar, Horse & Jockey and Adare over the last three months. In addition to training under the TASAH programme we held three Johne’s disease VRAMP training sessions. One training session focused on dairying and the remaining two had a strong emphasis on beef. While currently there is no Johne’s disease programme for the beef industry, interest has been expressed especially by those farmers who are involved in selling pedigree beef bulls into the dairy industry. As a result veterinary practitioners with a special interest in beef were trained to meet this demand using a modified VRAMP. However, these veterinary practitioners are also eligible to conduct dairy VRAMPs. Participation in VRAMP training is essential for vets wishing to become Approved Veterinary Practitioners (AVPs). In addition, AHI delivered three training sessions for private veterinary practitioners involved in the pig and poultry sectors. Training for pig veterinary practitioners was on the performance of assessments relating to the presence/management of risk factors for tail biting, while the poultry training focussed on biosecurity.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Focus on Technical Working Group Members

Name | Lindsey Drummond Profession | Veterinary Research Officer, AFBI TWG Membership | Johne’s disease

Lindsey is originally from a beef and sheep farm in Co. Fermanagh. She qualified as a veterinary surgeon in 2004 from the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies in Edinburgh. Since then she has predominantly worked in mixed practice. While there she developed a keen interest in herd health, infectious diseases and preventive medicine. She also spent time working as a Programme Manager for Animal Health and Welfare Northern Ireland with responsibility for the Bovine Viral Diarrhoea (BVD) Eradication Programme, and as a veterinary adviser for a veterinary pharmaceutical company. Lindsey joined AFBI in 2018 as a Veterinary Research Officer in the Disease Surveillance and Investigation Branch at the Veterinary Sciences Division. She currently manages the Diagnostic Bacteriology Laboratory and also co- ordinates AFBI’s Cattle Health Scheme. This is a voluntary scheme to award herd certification of disease status for Johne’s disease, BVD, Leptospirosis, IBR and Neospora.

Name | Niamh Field Profession | Veterinary Research Officer, Teagasc TWG Membership | Johne's Disease, IBR and BVD

Niamh is originally from Co. Kildare. She qualified as a veterinary surgeon from UCD in 2015 and spent four years working in large animal practice in the UK and Ireland, where she developed a keen interest in herd health. She particularly enjoyed working with farmers to effectively manage infectious disease in their herds. Niamh joined Teagasc Moorepark as a research officer for herd health in 2019, where she is involved in infectious disease research, as well as other aspects of herd health.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update CellCheck

Finola McCoy, Programme Manager

A n intern, funded by AHI, and supervised by Aine Regan and Emma Dillon of Teagasc, has commenced work, using the National Farm Survey data, to provide evidence of the economic benefits of milk recording. Findings from this analysis, along with insights from industry experts, will form the basis of an attitudinal survey to help identify Irish dairy farmers’ perceptions about different value propositions (benefits) of milk recording. Work has continued to address ongoing data quality issues, which to date has prevented final analysis of the 2018 national bulk tank SCC dataset. Work is also underway to streamline the collection process for the future, to allow early identification of data quality issues and to improve the efficiency of the process. A request has also been issued to processors for national bulk tank SCC data for Jan-April 2019. Planning is underway for a series of 14 autumn on-farm events, in partnership with Teagasc and the processors. These events will focus on the importance of the dry period and milk recording data and highlight ways to maximise the opportunities from both. The TWG has several currently active projects, including an information document on 'Critically Important Antimicrobials in Mastitis Control' as well as reviewing the structure of the Dry Cow Consult (delivered through the Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health, funded by the Rural Development Programme and coordinated by Animal Health Ireland) for the coming year. Analysis of the udder health outcomes for herds that participated in the Dry Cow consult in 2018 is also underway, by an intern based in Teagasc and UCD, on secondment to AHI. Work with ICBF has also commenced on the development of the Mastitis Investigation Tool. Theis purpose of this interactive tool is to allow interrogation of the milk recording results for both diagnostic and monitoring purposes, in relation to mastitis. Work has also commenced on analysing the sales data for intramammary products, from 2016-2018. This will build on previous research, which looked at sales patterns of intramammary products between 2003 and 2015. I was invited to attend the 13th meeting of the European Mastitis Panel, which was held in Ireland this year, and present an overview of the approach and progress to date in Irish udder health. I also attended the International Dairy Federation Mastitis Conference in Denmark, where I presented a paper and a poster on the CellCheck Milking For Quality awards, and the progress that we have made in Ireland in recent years in udder health.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update BVD

Dr Maria Guelbenzu, Programme Manager

Results By the end of Q2 of 2019 just over 1.88 million calves had been tested, representing approximately 82% of the anticipated calf crop for the year. The prevalence of PI births in 2019 continues to decline, with only 0.03% of calves tested this year being found to be persistently infected (PI) with BVDV (as compared to 0.05% in the same period of 2018) (Figure 1), with these being located in 0.65% of 83,000 breeding herds (compared to 0.87% in the same period of 2018) (Figure 2). This represents a decrease in PI prevalence of more than twenty-fold since the start of the compulsory phase of the programme in 2013, when 0.66% of calves born were PI. At the end of the quarter, there were 37 PIs alive in 30 herds. Updated programme results are available on a weekly basis online click here .

0.66 0.66

% PI ANIMALS

0.46

0.33

0.16

0.10 0.06 0.03

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017 2018 2019 (YTD)

Figure 1. Animal-level prevalence of PI calves born during each year of the programme (YTD; year to date).

11.3

% PI HERDS

7.6

5.9

3.2

2.0 1.07 0.65

2013

2014

2015

2016

(YTD) 2018 2019 2017

Figure 2. Herd- level prevalence of PI calves born during each year of the programme (YTD; year to date).

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update BVD

A series of enhancements to the programme were introduced in 2019. These focused on several areas that the BVD Implementation Group thought necessary to address in order to continue progress towards eradication of BVD. These measures have had an impact both in reducing the period from birth to test and of removal of positive calves when compared to the previous year. Analysis of the time in days from birth to test between January and the end of May for both 2018 and 2019 showed that in 2018 this took in average 17.6 days whilst in 2019 it took only 12.8 days. During the same period of time in 2018 it took a median of 12 days from test to removal of positive calves, whilst in 2019 it took a median of only 6 days. While this further improvement is encouraging, it is critical that calves are tested as soon as possible and that positive animals are removed without delay in order to deliver further progress in the programme and to achieve the goal of eradication by end of 2020. At the end of Q2 2019, there were only 73 PIs born during the year still alive. This corresponds to a reduction of 35% when compared to the 113 PIs alive at the same point last year. 30 herds were retaining PIs detected in 2019 at the end of Q2. The number of retaining herds has increased in comparison to the same point last year (20 herds) but, whilst in 2018 PIs were retained when there was no registered date of death within 5 weeks of the date of initial test; in 2019 this period was reduced to 3 weeks.

Negative herd status (NHS) The status of almost all animals in the 83,000 breeding herds in Ireland is now known, with exceptions falling into two groups. Firstly a decreasing number of animals born before the start of the compulsory programme in 2013 that have neither been tested nor produced a calf. At the end of Q2 the number of these animals was just over 5,000, representing 0.08% of the entire breeding herd population. The majority of these animals are in beef herds, and the majority are also male. Secondly there are over 22,000 animals born since January 2013 that do not have a valid test result and are therefore not compliant with the requirements of the legislation. The majority of these have never been tested, while a small number have had an initial empty result and have not been retested. Nearly 84% of these animals are 2019-born, with smaller numbers from preceding years. Reflecting the reduction in both PI births and the number of animals with an unknown status, the number of herds acquiring negative herd status (NHS) has increased. Herds qualify for negative herd status (NHS) by meeting the following requirements:

By the end of Q2 2019, over 90% of herds had acquired NHS, with a further 7,500 only being ineligible due to the presence of a small number of untested animals, as described above. It is critical that these animals are tested in the coming months...

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update BVD

1. Existence of a negative BVD status for every animal currently in the herd (on the basis of either ‘direct’ or ‘indirect’ results); 2. Absence of any animal(s) deemed to be persistently infected with BVD virus from the herd in the 12 months preceding the acquisition of NHS By the end of Q2 2019, over 90% of herds had acquired NHS, with a further 7,500 only being ineligible due to the presence of a small number of untested animals, as described above. It is critical that these animals are tested in the coming months, since the absence of their results is preventing these herds from achieving NHS. The annual TB test provides an ideal opportunity to identify and sample these animals, and a number of measures are planned to assist veterinary practitioners to more readily identify these animals. While an important programme milestone for any herd, NHS also brings with it an economic benefit, with a number of laboratories that use the RT-PCR test method offering testing at reduced costs to herds with NHS click here . BVD Technical Working Group The BVD TWG has met several times during this period in order to review the latest version of the Animal Health Law. The European Commission has developed a single comprehensive animal health law to replace the previous legislation which consisted of some 400 individual acts. A proposed Delegated Regulation that supplements the Animal Health Law as regards disease notification, reporting, surveillance, eradication programmes, and conditions for recognition and maintenance of disease-free status of countries and areas has been put forward for public consultation. This act contains measures affecting Member States which wish to have a programme to eradicate BVD and is currently under public consultation. The BVD IG has submitted a response to this consultation. Work is also ongoing on developing a model to inform decisions on post-eradication surveillance strategies.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update Johne’s Disease

Lorna Citer, Programme Manager

P hase Two of the Irish Johne’s Control Programme (IJCP) has commencedwithmore than 500 farmers registering since 1st January 2019. This brings the total number of herds registered with the IJCP to over 1,462 (8.1% of dairy herds), and 13.7% of the cows in Ireland. Interest inthe IJCPcontinues togrow,withasteadynumberof newregistrationseachmonth (Figure3). All stakeholders are encouraging herdowners to register with the IJCP and demonstrate their commitment to the integrity of Irish dairy products and Irish farming. A registration table for the IJCP was available at the Moorepark Open Day and interest was expressed by a number of farmers.

10 12 14

0 2 4 6 8

%

Q1 Q3 Figure 3. Progression of national dairy herds and cows (%) registered by quarter. Q2

The total number of herds registered with the IJCP is over 1,462 (8.1% of dairy herds), and 13.7% of the cows in Ireland.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update Johne’s Disease

Milk remains the preferred test matrix with approximately two thirds (66%) of the registered herds nominatingmilk as their preferred sampling method. This preference for milk testing has remained unchanged since the previous report but is consistent with an increased uptake in milk recording generally which facilitates the collection of samples for testing. JD TASAH investigations for ancillary test-positive herds has commenced and 13 herds have completed this activity. An additional 25 herds have registered for a TASAH investigation. At this stage it is too early to draw any conclusions from the data obtained as a result of these investigations. Additional TASAH training workshops are scheduled for the second half of the year to ensure all AVPs active in the IJCP have had access to TASAH training. Beef VRAMP professional development workshops for AVPs has also commenced with good attendance at the Grange and Gurteen events. This will ensure that beef herdowners will have access to current information about the prevention and control of Johne’s in beef herds. The JD Bulletin continues to be published monthly and provides information on current issues which have been raised by herdowners and stakeholders. All stakeholders are encouraged to subscribe to this and other AHI newsletters by following this link click here .

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update: IBR

Dr Maria Guelbenzu, Programme Manager

D uring the last three months the IBR Technical Working Group met once to discuss the results of the Pilot programme and to review the outcomes of several studies that have been carried out to address knowledge gaps previously identified by the IBR TWG. Another important piece of work that the IBR TWG has been undertaken during this quarter has been the review of the section of the proposed Animal Health Law that refers to IBR control programmes. It sets out the requirements for national IBR control programmes to be approved at European level and will come into effect on April 2021. This was the subject of a public consultation, to which a response was submitted by the IBR TWG. Modelling work The Irish animal-level model that will form the basis for both the BVD and IBRmodels is currently being developed. During this quarter, work has commenced on the disease-associated information. This model will support the development of options for a sustainable national IBR programme by allowing the testing of different strategies and their effects on the success, duration and cost of such a programme. This in turn will provide options for a consultation on progressing to a national programme.changes that this new law may bring to align proposals for a national programme with it.

The Irish animal- level model that will form the basis for both the BVD and IBR models is currently being developed. This model will support the development of options for a sustainable national IBR programme by allowing the testing of different strategies and their effects on the success, duration and cost of such a programme.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update Beef Healthcheck

Dr Natascha Meunier, Programme Manager

A series of six beef farmer events took place across the country in June with the collaboration of Teagasc and Meat Industry Ireland. The theme of the events was ‘a route to enhancing performance and efficiency’, an important focus for beef farmers in the present climate. There was good interaction with farmers and the farmer days were well received. The Beef HealthCheck programme reach a milestone of 2 million cattle slaughter reports this quarter. This is an amazing achievement with ongoing efforts by the factories and TVI’s to continue the programme despite some difficulties over the last three and a half years. Feedback from farmers during the beef events about the usefulness of the Beef HealthCheck reports was very encouraging. Reporting from factories has fully resumed this quarter with weekly slaughter reports reaching similar figures to previous years. This year to date, the 290,000 cattle slaughter reports indicate levels of liver fluke damage at 12.8% and pneumonia at 1.1% (Figure 4). Liver abscesses remain at 3.4%. Young bulls tended to have slighter higher levels of liver fluke and pneumonia, compared to steers and heifers, and steers tended to have higher levels of liver abscesses (Figure 5). The map shows the geographic spread of liver fluke damage in home bred cattle in each county for all the data to date (Figure 6). The north west counties are most affected by liver fluke, with Donegal and Leitrim showing the highest percentage of livers that have been damaged at some point during an animal’s life.

Live Fluke Fluke damage Abscess

%

Figure 4. Average weekly Beef HealthCheck liver results for 2019 to date. Week

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update Beef Healthcheck

8

Heifers Steers Young Bulls

6

%

4

2

0

Fluke damage

Live fluke

Liver abscess

Pneumonia

Figure 5. Beef HealthCheck liver and lung results by carcase type for 2019 to date.

Figure 6. Average percentage of liver fluke damage per county.

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