CellCheck_Newsletter_October FINAL

OCTOBER EDITION 2017

ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health CellCheck NEWSLETTER

CELLCHECK PROGRAMME NEWS

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www.AnimalHealthIreland.ie

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR P4

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH P6

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27

AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of our stakeholders to the CellCheck programme.

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27

CELLCHECK PROGRAMME

October News

Finola McCoy, Programme Manager

W elcome to the October issue of the CellCheck newsletter. In this issue, our guest contributor from Lakeland Dairies, TomDownes, looks at ways to maximise milk quality in late lactation. This will ensure that suppliers can capture the maximum milk price possible. We also look at the practice of dry cow therapy and what we are trying to achieve from this practice. There is increasing discussion about using blanket or selective therapy, and in this article we explore these various options. Work is also underway collating the 2016 bulk tank SCC data and updating the national bulk tank SCC database. This data, submitted by all the processors to DAFM, forms the basis of the very successful CellCheck Milking for Quality Award scheme each year. Planning is also underway for a national awards ceremony to recognise all the winning suppliers. KT Programme participants – facilitators and farmers – are reminded that you must partake in a CellCheck Farmer Workshop before the end of the year. Any Facilitator unsure of their scheduled date should contact AHI as soon as possible as DAFM are applying a penalty for non-participation.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • OCTOBER EDITION 2017

Guest Contributor

Maximising Milk Quality in Late Lactation

Tom Downes, Milk Quality Advisor, Lakeland Dairies

M ilk price at present is in the mid- thirties, and as we head into late lactation many milk producers with good fats and proteins achieve prices in excess of 40c/litre. Many of the earlier milk cheques will have been used to clear bills from spring and last year; it should be possible now to hold onto most of the next payments. It is critical from now on to monitor milk quality closely, to maximise bonuses and avoid penalties.

1. Maintain low TBC’s - the target here is 3-6,000/ml but always under 10,000. Regular descaling with hot water (with starting temperatures of 80 degrees and dump temperatures of 55 degrees), and following the manufacturer’s instructions on all products used will deliver these results. 2. Maintain low thermoduric counts - ideally under 500/ml, using the same washing routine necessary for managing TBCs. Clip tails, dry wet teats, don’t wash clusters while they’re on the cows, keep roadways, collecting yards, slats and cubicles clean and use peracetic acid in the final rinse water of the milking machine and tank. 3. SCC’s may start to creep up on some farms - the target here is to keep the bulk tank SCC under 150,000 cells/ mL. Milk record all cows and select and dry off cows with SCCs > 200,000 cells/mL, low lactose and low yield. Move them to an outside farm or at least well away from the farmyard. Identify problem quarters on any other cows with SCC >200,000 cells/mL using the California Mastitis Test paddle (CMT)- these quarters may be suitable for treatment, or the quarter may need to be dried off. Liaise with your veterinary practitioner on this issue- bacterial identification may be necessary for making these decisions, a service that most co-op laboratories offer.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • OCTOBER EDITION 2017

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR 4. Monitor lactose levels- lactose percentage will drop in late lactation, and indicates (a) that the cow should be dried off or (b) her diet isn’t sufficient to maintain reasonable yield or lactose percentage. Any cows yielding 10 litres or less should be dried off. Most purchasers have lactose penalties / bonuses over the Autumn / Winter period, so don’t miss out on this bonus. 5. Ensure all rinse water is drained from the milking machine and tank pre-milking, as even relatively small volumes of water in your milk when milk volumes drop can cause reductions in your fats, proteins and lactose. You could also incur a penalty for excess water. 6. Minimise the risk of milk residues - chlorine,, if not used correctly, can cause high TCM& chlorate levels in milk. Adequate rinsing pre & post washing with minimum 14 litres of water/unit is essential. The use of non-chlorine detergents is the most effective way to reduce the risk of chlorine residues. 7. Ensure all antibiotic withholding dates are adhered to, and if in doubt, contact your co-op advisor to have samples tested. Remember, all cleaning products used on milking machines and milk tanks, should have a PCS number which signifies registration with Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine. These products are effective when used according to the manufacturer’s instructions - overuse will not deliver better results, but can create a residue risk and could damage your rubberware. If you have concerns relating to any of these quality factors, contact your milk advisor, veterinary practitioner or milking machine technician. 8. If you are a “winter milk” producer, be aware of all supply conditions and quality criteria.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • OCTOBER EDITION 2017

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH Dry cow therapy-selective or blanket? T here is much discussion lately about the growing challenge of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and how the use of antibiotics in both humans and animals can contribute to it. The use of antibiotics at the end of lactation is one area that is receiving increasing attention. There is much discussion about whether farmers should use blanket or selective dry cow therapy in their herds-what does this actually mean and why do we use dry cow therapy at all? [Click here] for previously published tips Remember! Dry cow therapy (DCT) consists of intramammary antibiotic tubes and/or internal teat sealer. The purpose of DCT is to: 1. eliminate existing udder infections at the end of lactation 2. and prevent new infections over the dry period. Blanket DCT: This is when all quarters of all cows are treated with antibiotic. Selective DCT: This is when only selected cows i.e. those with infected quarters, are treated with antibiotic. Internal teat sealer can then be used in the remainder of the herd.

When it comes to deciding between blanket and selective DCT, it is not a case of “one size fits all”. However, there are certain criteria that a herd owner should be able to fulfil, in order to safely consider using selective DCT. For example, regular milk recording is essential, as without this it is not possible to make informed decisions on the likely infection status of each individual animal. Milk cultures results are also important, as blanket DCT may still be necessary for some herds depending on the bacterial challenges that they face. Excellent hygiene when administering any DCT is critical, but even more so with selective DCT, as there is no antibiotic being administered at the same time.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER OCTOBER EDITION 2017

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH

For full details on using selective DCT in your herd, read Management Note C in the ‘CellCheck Farm Guidelines for Control’, and discuss with your vet. If you can’t fulfil all the recommended criteria, for example if you are not milk recording, then start milk recording now so that by Autumn 2018 you will be in a better position to consider selective DCT for your herd and to safely reduce the amount of antibiotic that you use. For more information and practical tips on Dry Cow Therapy, see CellCheck Farm Guidelines for Mastitis Control -Guidelines 16 – 18 & Management Notes C – F.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • OCTOBER EDITION 2017

CELLCHECK REGIONAL COORDINATORS

A Resource and Point of Contact for CellCheck Activities in your Area

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Tom Starr 087 6697010

Mícheal Guinan 086 3511852 micheal.guinan@aurivo.ie Mayo/Sligo Aurivo

tstarr@arrabawn.ie Tipperary/Limerick National Co-op

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John Fitzpatrick 086 0426567

Sean McCarthy 066 7163200 sean.mccarthy@kerry.ie Kerry/Clare Kerry Agribusiness

fitzpatrickj@glanbia.ie Kilkenny/Laois/Carlow/ Kildare/Dublin Glanbia

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Sinead Treanor streanor@carbery.com 023 8822369 West Cork Carbery Group

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Andrew O’Neill 086 1836505 aoneill@tipperary-coop.ie Tipperary Tipperary Co-Op

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Tom Downes 087 2564669

Denis Guiry 086 8098639 dguiry@dairygold.ie Cork/Tipperary/Limerick Dairygold

downest@lakeland.ie Longford/Monaghan Lakeland Dairies

Brendan Dillon 087 2626851 BrDillon@glanbia.ie

Cork/Waterford/ Wexford/Wicklow Glanbia

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • OCTOBER EDITION 2017

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