TX_HMH_G1TG_M7

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TEACHER’S GUIDE GRADE 1

Teacher’s Guide GRADE 1 • VOLUME 5

Authors and Advisors Alma Flor Ada • Kylene Beers • F. Isabel Campoy Joyce Armstrong Carroll • Nathan Clemens Anne Cunningham • Martha Hougen Elena Izquierdo • Carol Jago • Erik Palmer Robert Probst • Shane Templeton • Julie Washington

Contributing Consultants David Dockterman • Mindset Works Jill Eggleton

Copyright © 2020 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

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Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt is delighted to welcome you to our brand-new literacy program built for Texas. HMH Into Reading ™ combines the best practices of balanced literacy with comprehensive coverage of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading and the English Language Proficiency Standards . The authors and consultants who contributed to Into Reading share a deep commitment to education and a passion for learning. We look forward to sharing the story of our programwith you—and to helping all of your students get Into Reading and become lifelong learners.

CONTENTS PROGRAM OVERVIEW

Authors and Advisors

Make Meaningful Connections Between Reading and Writing Maximize Growth Through Data-Driven Differentiation and Assessment

iv–v

xiv–xv

Develop Collaborative, Self-Directed Learners

vi–vii

xvi–xvii

Build Content Knowledge Through Multi-Genre Text Sets Support Vocabulary and Language Development

Respond to the Needs of All Learners

viii–ix

xviii–ix

Foster a Mindset for Learning

x

xx

Build Foundational Reading Skills

Connect with Families and Community

xi

xx

Foster Critical Thinking and Deep Analysis of Text Notice & Note: Strategies for Close Reading

Build a Culture of Professional Growth

xxi

xii–xiii

Student and Teacher Materials

xxii–xxiii

Volume Contents

xxiv–xxxv

xiii

Small-Group Reading

xxxvi

HMH Into Reading ™ Authors and Advisors

Kylene Beers, Ed.D. Nationally known lecturer and author on reading and literacy; national and international consultant dedicated to improving literacy, particularly for striving readers; coauthor of Disruptive Thinking , Notice & Note: Strategies for Close Reading , and Reading Nonfiction: Notice & Note Stances, Signposts, and Strategies Joyce Armstrong Carroll, Ed.D., H.L.D. Nationally known consultant on the teaching of writing, with classroom experience in every grade from primary through graduate school, codirector of Abydos Literacy Learning, which trains teachers in writing instruction; coauthor of Acts of Teaching: How to Teach Writing Nathan Clemens, Ph.D. Associate Professor, University of Texas, Austin; researcher and educator with a focus on improving instruction, assessment, and intervention for students with reading difficulties in kindergarten through adolescence Anne Cunningham, Ph.D. Professor, University of California, Berkeley; nationally recognized researcher on literacy and development across the life span; coauthor of Book Smart: How to Develop and Support Successful, Motivated Readers Martha C. Hougen, Ph.D. Teacher educator focused on reforming educator preparation to better address the diverse needs of students; coeditor and contributing author of Fundamentals of Literacy Instruction & Assessment Pre-K–6

Carol Jago, M.A. Nationally known author and lecturer on reading and writing with 32 years of classroom experience; author of With Rigor for All and the forthcoming The Book in Question: How and Why Reading Is in Crisis ; national consultant who focuses on text complexity, genre instruction, and the use of appropriate literature in the K–12 classroom Erik Palmer, M.A. Veteran teacher and consultant whose work focuses on how to teach oral communication and good thinking (argument, persuasion, and reasoning), and how to use technology in the classroom to improve instruction; author of Well Spoken and Good Thinking Robert E. Probst, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus, Georgia State University; nationally known literacy consultant to national and international schools; author of Response and Analysis and coauthor of Disruptive Thinking , Notice & Note: Strategies for Close Reading , and Reading Nonfiction: Notice & Note Stances, Signposts, and Strategies Shane Templeton, Ph.D. Foundation Professor Emeritus of Literacy Studies at the University of Nevada, Reno; researcher and practitioner with a focus on developmental word knowledge; author of Words Their Way JulieWashington, Ph.D. Professor, Georgia State University; researcher with an emphasis on the intersection of cultural dialect use, literacy attainment, and academic performance; author of numerous articles on language and reading development, and on language disorders in urban children growing up in poverty; consultant for iRead , System 44 , and READ 180 Universal

iv

Into Reading and ¡Arriba la lectura! Alma Flor Ada, Ph.D. Into Reading and ¡Arriba la lectura! Alma Flor Ada, Ph.D.

Professor Emerita, University of San Francisco; internationally renowned expert in bilingual literature and literacy; author of over 200 award- winning books, both academic and for young readers; a leading mentor in transformative education F. Isabel Campoy Award-winning bilingual author of over 150 children’s books of poetry, theater, stories, biographies, art, and culture; internationally recognized scholar, educator, and translator; a member of the North American Academy of Spanish Language Elena Izquierdo, Ph.D. Associate Professor of teacher education at the University of Texas, El Paso; researcher and practitioner with a focus on dual-language education, biliteracy, and educational equity for English learners Into Read ng and ¡Ar iba la lectura! Alma Flor Ada, Ph.D. Professor Emerita, University of San Francisco; internationally renowned expert in bilingual literature and literacy; author of over 200 award- winning books, both academic and for young readers; a leading mentor in transformative education F. Isabel Campoy Award-winning bilingual author of over 150 children’s books of poetry, theater, stories, biographies, art, and culture; internationally recognized scholar, educator, and translator; a member of the North American Academy of Spanish Language Elena Izquierdo, Ph.D. Associate Professor of teacher education at the University of Texas, El Paso; researcher and practitioner with a focus on dual-language education, biliteracy, and educational equity for English learners

Contributing Consultants Contributing Consultants

Contrib ing Consultants

David Dockterman, Ed.D. Lecturer at Harvard University Graduate School of Education whose work focuses on turning research into effective, innovative practice to meet the variable needs of all learners; advisor on MATH 180 and READ 180 Universal David Dockterman, Ed.D. Lecturer at Harvard University Graduate School of Education whose work focuses on turning research into effective, innovative practice to meet the variable needs of all learners; advisor on MATH 180 and READ 180 Universal Jill Eggleton, QSO (Queen’s Service Order in Literacy and Education), Ed.D. Leading balanced-literacy expert, international consultant, and teacher with over 35 years of teaching and administration experience; trains and inspires educators in how to incorporate balanced-literacy methods in the classroom; Adjunct Professor, Sioux Falls University; Margaret Mahy Literacy Medal award winner; author of over 1000 children’s books, poetry, and teacher resources Jill Eggleton, QSO (Queen’s Service Order in Literacy and Education), Ed.D. Leading balanced-literacy expert, international consultant, and teacher with over 35 years of teaching and administration experience; trains and inspires educators in how to incorporate balanced-literacy methods in the classroom; Adjunct Professor, Sioux Falls University; Margaret Mahy Literacy Medal award winner; author of over 1000 children’s books, poetry, and teacher resources David Dockterman, Ed.D. Lecturer at Harvar University Graduate of Educati n whose work focuses on tur research into eff ctive, nnovative practi meet the v riable needs of all learners; a on MATH 180 and READ 180 Universal Jill Eggl to , QSO (Queen’s Servic in Literacy and Education), Ed.D. Leading balanced-li acy expert, intern consultan , and teach r with over 35 ye teaching a d adm nistra ion experience and inspires educat s in how to incorp balance -literacy methods in the classro Adjunct Professor, Sioux Falls University; Ma garet Mahy Literacy M dal award wi author of over 1000 children’s books, po teacher resources

Professor Emerit , Univer ity of San Francisco; i ter ationally re ow ed expert in bilingual literature and literacy; author of over 200 award- winning books, both academic and for young readers; a leadi g mentor in transformative education F. Isabel Campoy Award-winning bilingual author of over 150 childr n’s books of p etry, theater, stories, biographies, ar , and culture; internationally recognized scholar, educator, and translator; a member of the North American Academy of Spanish Language Elena Izquierdo, Ph.D. Ass ciate Prof ssor of te cher education at the University of T xas, El Paso; researcher and practitioner with focus on dual-language educ tion, biliteracy, and educational equity for English learners

v

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texa

v

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

ing ™ Texas

HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

Develop Collaborative, Self-Directed Learners Into Reading’ s WorkshopModel utilizes a gradual release of responsibility that sets students on a path to mastery and success. ollaborative, ted Learn rs orkshopModel utilizes a of responsibility that s ts th to mastery a d success.

ReadingWorkshop A quick whole-group minilesson is follo ed by small-group and independent application time, during which studen s practice collaboratively and on their own.

ReadingWorkshop A quick whole-group minilesson is followed by small-group and independent application time, during which students practice collaboratively and on their own.

Develop Collaborative, Self-Directed Learners Into Reading’ s Works opModel utilizes a gradual rele e of responsibility that sets students on a path to mastery and success.

ReadingWorkshop A quick whole-group minilesson is followed by small-group a independent application time, during which students practic collaboratively and on their own.

WHOLE-GROUP MINILESSON

WHOLE-GROUP MINILESSON

COLL

WHOLE-GROUP MINILESSON

Learn Together 15–20 minut s

Learn Together 15–20 minutes

Learn Together 15–20 minute

inilesson to s of a

Small-Group Instruction Mu tiple ptions for small-gro p nstruc to meet the needs of diverse learners.

Whole-Group Minilesson Students are introduced to skills via Anchor Charts and the shared reading of a common text. ANCHOR CHART 18: Story Structure Stories often have a similar structure. Authors organize stories in a way that will entertain readers. Story Structure ha-cmyk_1_rnlete485441_41a.pdf 2 12/17/17 12:21 PM

Small-Group Instruction Multiple options for small-group instruction allow teachers to meet the needs of diverse learners. GUIDED READINGWITH LEVELED LIBRARY Advance student ability with texts that engage and challenge readers at their instructional level. FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS DEVELOPMENT Build students’ foundational reading skills through reading decodable texts and other support activities based on need. SKILL AND STRATEGY LESSONS Provide targeted support in specific skills and strategies based on individual student needs. SUPPORT FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS Provide instruction and practice in a safe, risk-free setting, allowing English learners to experiment with language. END The end tells the resolution, or how the characters solve the problem. allow te che s

ANCHOR CHART 18: Story Structure ha-cmyk_1_rnlete485441_41a.pdf 2 12/17/17 12:21 PM Whole-Group Minilesson Students are introduced to skills via Anchor Charts and the shared reading of a common text.

Small-Grou I struction Multiple options for small-group instruction allow teacher to meet the needs of diverse learners. GUIDED READINGWITH LEVELED LIBRARY Advance student ability with texts that engage and challenge readers at their instructional level. FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS DEVELOPMENT Build students’ foundational reading skills through reading decodable texts and other support activities based on need. SKILL AND STRATEGY LESSONS Provide targeted support in specific skills and strategies based on individual student needs. SUPPORT FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS Provide instruction and practice in a safe, risk-free setting, allowing English learners to experiment with language.

MIDDLE Build students’ foundational read ng skills through readi g decodable texts and other support activities based on n ed. SKILL AND STRATEGY LES ONS Provid targeted support in specific skills and strategies ba ed on individual student needs. SUPPORT FOR ENGLISH LEARNE S Provide instruction and practice in a safe, risk-free setting, allowing English learners to experiment with languag . END The middle is made up of events that happen as the characters try to solve the problem. The end tells the resolution, or how the characters solve the problem. Stories often have a similar structure. Authors organize stories in a way that will entertain readers. Story Structure ha-cmyk_1_rnlete485441_41a.pdf 2 12/17/17 12:21 PM GUIDED READINGWITH LEVEL LIBRARY Advance student ability with texts that ngag and challenge readers t their ins ructional lev l. FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS DEVELOPMENT ANCHOR CHART 18: Story Structure BEGINNING In the beginning, the characters face a problem. MIDDLE The middle is made up of events that happen as the characters try to solve the problem. Stories often have a similar structure. Authors organize stories in a way that will entertain readers. Story Structure All of these parts make up a story’s plot.

MIDDLE

The middle is made up of events that happen as the characters try to solve the problem.

BEGINNING In the beginning, the characters face a problem.

END

BEGINNING In the beginning, the characters face a problem.

The end tells the resolution, or how the characters solve the problem.

All of these parts make up a story’s plot.

All of these parts make up a story’s plot.

vi

vi

ReadingWor

ReadingWorkshop

WHOLE-GROUP WRAP-UP

WHOLE-GROU WRAP-UP

COLLABORATIVE WORK

COLLABORATIVE WORK

INDEPENDENT PRACTICE

I DEPENDENT PRACTICE

TEACHER-LED SMALL GROUPS

TEACHER-LED SMALL GROUPS

Small-Group a d Independent Work 45–60 minutes

Wrap-Up 5 minute

Small-Group and Independent Work 45–60 minutes

Wrap-Up 5 minutes

Independent and CollaborativeWork Opportuniti s for independent work allow students to practic and apply targeted nowledge and skills.

Independent and CollaborativeWork Opportunities for independent work allow students to practice and apply targeted knowledge and skills.

LITERACY CENTERS Engaging ctivities across a variety f instructional contexts allow stud nts to synthesize informa ion and solidify their understanding.

my BOOK Wri e-in student ext offers opportunities to read, write, r spond to complex texts. GENRE ST DY BOOK CLUBS Conversati n about books fosters excitement about rea writing. STUDENT CHOICE LIBRARY BOOKS Self-selected re ding creates an authentic opportunity fo stud nt to pr ctic new skills and h i hten r ading enga INQUIRY AND RESEARCH PROJECT Research- and inquiry-based activities are consistent wi project-based learning.

LITERACY CENTERS Engaging activities across a variety of instructional contexts allow students to synthesize information and solidify their understanding.

my BOOK Write-in student text offers opportunities to read, write, and respond to complex texts. GENRE STUDY BOOK CLUBS Conversation about books fosters excitement about reading and writing. STUDENT CHOICE LIBRARY BOOKS Self-selected reading creates an authentic opportunity for students to practice new skills and heighten reading engagement. INQUIRY AND RESEARCH PROJECT Research- and inquiry-based activities are consistent with project-based learning.

WORDWORK

WORDWORK

CREATIVITY CORNER

CREATIVITY CORNER

DIGITAL STATION

DIGITAL STATION

EADING CORNER

READING CORNER

TEAMWORK TIME

TEAMWORK TIME

vii

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texa

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

InDesign Notes 1. This is a list

InDesign Notes 1. This is a list

ing ™ Texas

HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

DO NOT EDIT--Changes must be made through “File info” CorrectionKey=TX-A Grade 1 Teacher’s Guide , Volume 2, Module 3 Build Content Knowledge Through Multi-Genre Text Sets Authentic and award-winning texts build topic knowledge expertise and support reading growth for all students. Develop Collaborative, Self-Directed Learners Into Reading’ s WorkshopM del utilizes a gradual release of responsibility that sets students on a path to mast ry and success. ollaborative, ted Learn rs orkshopModel utilizes a of responsibility that s ts th to mastery and success.

ReadingWorkshop A quick whole-group minilesson is followed by small-group a d independent application time, during which students practice collaboratively and on their own.

ReadingWorkshop A quick whole-group minilesson is followed by small-group a independent application time, during which students practic collaboratively and on their own.

WHOLE-GROUP MINILESSON

MODULE

Welcome to theModule

3

COLL

WHOLE-GROUP MINILESSON

Teaching with Text Sets Carefully selected, content-rich text sets help children build topic knowledge and reading skills.

The selections in eachmodule purposefully contribute to students’ overall content and genre knowledge.

WEEK 1

BIG BOOK

my BOOK

my BOOK

GET CURIOUS VIDEO

Animal Q& A

by Carole Roberts Nest The illustrated by Nina de Polonia

Introduce and spark interest in the module topic .

1re_se_m3_ma_gs1218.indd 12

1/9/18 9:10PM

1re_se_m3_nest.indd 15

11/9/2017 6:58:17AM

Genre: Informational Text Lexile Measure: NC920L

Hidden Animals Children view and respond to the video Hidden Animals to learn more about animals and camouflage.

Genre: Realistic Fiction Lexile Measure: 260L Guided Reading Level: F

Genre: Informational Text Lexile Measure: 310L Guided Reading Level: E

Learn Together 15–20 minutes

Learn Together 15–20 minute

Build and activate background knowledge about the module topic.

inilesson to s of a

WEEK 2 Small-Group Instruction Mu tiple ptions for small-group instruction allow teachers to meet the needs of diverse learners. GUIDED READINGWITH LEVELED LIBRARY Advance student ability with texts that engage and challenge readers at their instructional level. FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS DEVELOPMENT Build students’ foundational reading skills through reading decodable texts and other support activities based on need. SKILL AND STRATEGY LESSONS Provide targeted support in specific skills and strategies based on individual student needs. SUPPORT FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS Provide instruction and practice in a safe, risk-free setting, allowing English learners to experim nt with language. READ ALOUDBOOK Genre: Informational Text Lexile Measure: AD770L 1re_se_m3_coyote.indd 39 Module 3 • Amazing Animals T6 BEGINNING In the beginning, the characters face a problem. ANCHOR CHART 18: Story Structure ha-cmyk_1_rnlete485441_41a.pdf 2 12/17/17 12:21 PM MIDDLE END The middle is made up of events that happen as the characters try to solve the problem. The end tells the resolution, or how the characters solve the problem. Stories often have a similar structure. Authors organize stories in a way that will entertain readers. Story Structure

Whole-Group Minilesson Students are introduced to skills via Anchor Charts and the shared reading of a common text.

my BOOK Small-Group Instruction Multiple options for small-group instruction allow teacher to meet the needs of diverse learners. GUIDED READINGWITH LEVELED LIBRARY Advance student ability with texts that engage and challenge readers at their instructional level. FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS DEVELOPMENT Build students’ foundational reading skills through reading decodable texts and other support activities based on need. SKILL AND STRATEGY LESSONS Provide targeted support in specific skills and strategies based on individual student needs. SUPPORT FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS Provide instruction and practice in a safe, risk-free setting, allowing English learners to experiment with language. my BOOK Genre: Narrative Nonfiction Lexile Measure: AD430L Guided Reading Level: G Genre: Folktale Lexile Measure: 310L Guided Reading Level: F a Native American tale, as told by James Bruchac illustrated by Chris Lensch Blue Bird and Coyote 11/16/2017 12:42:38AM HAVE YOU HEARD THE NESTING BIRD? by Rita Gray illustrated by Kenard Pak 1re_se_m3_nestingbird.indd 57 11/9/2017 6:58:51AM 3/2/18 10:10 AM

ANCHOR CHART 18: Story Structure ha-cmyk_1_rnlete485441_41a.pdf 2 12/17/17 12:21 PM

Model fluent reading and promote listening comprehension. Stories often hav a similar structure. Authors organize stories in a way that will entertain readers. Story Structure

MIDDLE

Interact with complex texts by annotating , taking notes, and marking text evidence in the Student my Book. BEGINNING END The middle is made up of events that happen as the characters try to solve the problem.

The end tells the resolution, or how the characters solve the problem.

In the b ginning, the characters face a problem.

All of these parts make up a story’s plot.

1re_te_ts_03.indd 6

All of these parts make up a story’s plot.

viii

vi

Readin Wor

Build Content Knowledge

DO NOT EDIT--Changes must be made through “File info” CorrectionKey=TX-A

WHOLE-GROU WRAP-UP

Amazing Animals

COLLABORATIVE WORK

INDEPENDENT PRACTICE

Essential Question

Inspire inquiry and set a purpose for reading.

p_body-question All texts in this set address the question: How do animals’ bodies help them? pA

WEEK 3

READ ALOUDBOOK

my BOOK

my BOOK

Animal Kingdom from the t

DONOTEDIT--Changesmustbemade through“File info” CorrectionKey=TX-A

TEACHER-LED SMALL GROUPS

fromNationalGeographicKids Beaver Family

from How to Swallow a Pig

1re_se_m3_beaverfamily.indd 101

11/16/2017 12:35:17AM

1re_se_m3_swallowpig.indd 83

11/9/2017 6:56:41AM

Genre: Video Small-Group and Independent Work 45–60 minutes

Wrap-Up 5 minute

Genre: Fantasy Lexile Measure: AD570L

Genre: Procedural Text Lexile Measure: 480L Guided Reading Level: H

Independent and CollaborativeWork Opportunities for independent work allow students to practice and apply targeted knowledge and skills.

WRITING FOCAL TEXT

Genre: Informational Text Lexile Measure: 330L Guided Reading Level: C

LITERACY CENTERS Engaging activities across a variety of instructional contexts allow students to synthesize information and solidify their understanding.

Launch Writer’s Workshop with high-interest trade books. my BOOK Write-in student text offers opportunities to read, write, respond to complex texts. GENRE STUDY BOOK CLUBS Conversation about books fosters excitement about rea writing. STUDENT CHOICE LIBRARY BOOKS Self-selected reading creates an authentic opportunity fo students to practice new skills and heighten reading enga INQUIRY AND RESEARCH PROJECT Research- and inquiry-based activities are consistent wi project-based learning.

WORDWORK

CREATIVITY CORNER

DIGITAL STATION

READING CORNER

T7

Welcome to the Module

TEAMWORK TIME

1re_te_ts_03.indd 7

3/2/18 10:10 AM

ix

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texa

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

InDesign Notes 1. This is a list

InDesign Notes 1. This is a list

ing ™ Texas

HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

ACADEMICVOCABULARY Support Vocabulary and Language Development Learning flows through language. As students engage in academic discussion , construct meaning from texts , and put their own ideas into writing , they embrace the power of using language to communicate effectively. Develop Collaborative, Self-Directed Learn s Into Reading’ s WorkshopModel utilizes a gradual release of responsibility that sets students on a path to mastery and success. ollaborative, ted Learners orkshopModel utilizes a of responsibility that s ts th to mastery and success. ReadingWorkshop A quick whole-group minilesson is followed by small-group a d independent application time, during which students practice collaboratively and on their own. Grade 1 Teacher’s Guide , Volume 2, Module 4

ReadingWorkshop A quick whole-group minilesson is followed by small-group a independent application time, during which students practic collaboratively and on their own.

LESSON 3

WHOLE-GROUP MINILESSON

COLL

Introduce Power Words

Daily vocabulary lessons touch on all aspects of vocabulary acquisition, in and out of the context of reading.

WHOLE-GROUP MINILESSON

Use the steps I Do It, We Do It, You Do It with the information in the chart below to teach the Power Words from Goal!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Language Answer questions and discuss meanings to develop vocabulary. • Identify real-life connections between words and their use.

1 Power Word

2 Meaning

3 Example

A team is a group of people who play a game against another group.

team (n.) (p. 115)

MAKE A CONNECTION Talk about players on teams. When you are on a team , you work together with other players. MAKE A CONNECTION Relate to children’s activities. A helmet is a piece of equipment you need to ride a bike. MAKE A CONNECTION Talk about examples of coaching. If you coach a football team, you lead the players and teach the how to play the game. USE A PROP Point out the list of classroom rules. We follow these rules in our classroom. ACT IT OUT Pantomime kicking a ball as if scoring a goal. I score a goal when I kick the ball into the net. ACT IT OUT Clap and cheer, saying, “Hurray! Let’s go, team!” I am a fan of the team.

MATERIALS Online VocabularyCards 4.10–4.15 Classroommaterials listof classroom rules

Your equipment is the stuff you need to play a game or do a job.

equipment (n.) (p. 116)

Students learn Power Words , which are drawn from the literature, through a consistent, routine approach for acquiring new words.

If you coach people, you tell and show them how to do something.

coach (v.) (p. 117)

Rules tell what you can and cannot do.

rules (n.) (p. 118)

In addition to receiving direct instruction about specific words, students also learn to uncover the meanings of words on their own. • Through Generative Vocabulary lessons, one or more of the week’s Power Words serves as a springboard to learning other words with a morphological or semantic relationship. • A focus Vocabulary Strategy in each module gives students a growing list of tools to unlock meaning when they encounter unknown words in their reading. Small-Group Instruction Multiple options for small-group instruction allow teacher to meet the needs of diverse learners. GUIDED READINGWITH LEVELED LIBRARY Advance student ability with texts that engage and challenge readers at their instructional level. FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS DEVELOPMENT Build students’ foundational reading skills through reading decodable texts and other support activities based on need. SKILL AND STRATEGY LESSONS Provide targeted support in specific skills and strategies based on individual student needs. SUPPORT FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS Provide instruction and practice in a safe, risk-free setting, allowing English learners to experiment with language. Learn Together 15–20 minute

When you get a goal in a game, you get one or more points.

goal (n.) (p. 125)

Learn Together 15–20 minutes

If you are a fan of something, you like it very much.

fan (n.) (p. 126)

inilesson to s of a

ENGLISH LEARNER SUPPORT: Facilitate Language Connections Small-Group Instruction Mu tiple ptions for small-group instruction allow teachers to meet the needs of diverse learners. GUIDED READINGWITH LEVELED LIBRARY Advance student ability with texts th t ngage and challenge readers at their instructional level. FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS DEVELOPMENT Build students’ foundational reading skills through reading decodable texts and other support activities based on need. SKILL AND STRATEGY LESSONS Provide targeted support in specific skills and strategies based on individual student needs. SUPPORT FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS Provide instruction and practice in a safe, risk-free setting, allowing English learners to experim nt with language. ALL LEVELS Children whose first language is Cantonese or Korean may have some difficulty pronouncing and hearing the long e , long o , and long u vowel sounds. Speakers of Hmong may also be challenged by the long o vowel sound. Say the following words, elongating the vowel sound: team , seem , need , feet . Say the words again and have children repeat after you. Use the same procedure with the words coach , goal , boat , soap and rules , soon , too , blue . ANCHOR CHART 18: Story Structure Stories often have a similar structure. Authors organize stories in a way that will entertain readers. Story Structure ha-cmyk_1_rnlete485441_41a.pdf 2 12/17/17 12:21 PM ELPS1C,1E,2C,3C BEGINNING In the beginning, the characters face a problem. MIDDLE END The middle is made up of events that happen as the characters try to solve the problem. The end tells the resolution, or how the characters solve the problem.

Whole-Group Minilesson Students are introduced to skills via Anchor Charts and the shared reading of a common text.

ANCHOR CHART 18: Story Structure ha-cmyk_1_rnlete485441_41a.pdf 2 12/17/17 12:21 PM

Stories often have a similar structure. Authors organize stories in a way that will entertain readers. Story Structure

TEXASESSENTIALKNOWLEDGEANDSKILLS 1.1A listenactively/askandanswerquestions; 1.1D workcollaborativelyby following rules for discussion; 1.3B use illustrations/texts to learn/clarifywordmeanings; 1.3D identify/usewords thatnameactions,directions,positions,sequences, categories, locations;

T310

Module4• Lesson3

MIDDLE

The middle is made up of events that happen as the characters try to solve the problem.

BEGINNING In the beginning, the characters face a problem.

END

The end tells the resolution, or how the characters solve the problem.

All of these parts make up a story’s plot.

All of these parts make up a story’s plot.

x

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ReadingWor

Language and Foundational Skills

Build Foundational Reading Skills

Explicit and systematic instruction in phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, and spelling provides students with the critical building blocks to become confident, independent readers and writers.

Grade 1 Teacher’s Guide , Volume 4, Module 8

I Do It, We Do It, You Do It lesson format ensures consistent delivery of instruction to students, followed by immediate guided and independent practice.

PHONICS

FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS

WHOLE-GROU WRAP-UP

Phonics Review

COLLABORATIVE WORK

INDEPENDENT PRACTICE

I Do It SpotlightonLetters Use the SOUND-BY-SOUNDBLENDING routine to review this week’sphonicelements:digraphs th and wh, and (trigraph) -tch, and inflections -s, -es. Modelblending when withLetterCards (ordisplay thewrittenword).Say the first two soundsseparately, then together; thensay the lastsoundandadd it to theblended sounds.Repeat for paths,patches . TEKS1.2B(i),1.2B(ii),1.2B(iii),1.2B(v);ELPS2A,2B

LEARNING OBJECTIVE • Blend,decode,andbuild regularly spelledone-syllablewordswith consonantdigraphs th and wh, (trigraph ) -tch, andbasewordswith inflectionalendings -s and -es. Online LetterCards a,e,n,p,s, tch, th,wh DisplayandEngage Blendand Read4.7 StartRightReader Book2,p.156 MATERIALS

We Do It BlendandRead ProjectDisplayand Engage: BlendandRead4.7 oruseStart RightReaderpage156. 1 Line1 Havechildren read the line. Thenpromptaconversationabout thewords: Whatdoyounoticeabout thewords?Whichwordsnamemore thanone? Reread the linechorally. 2 Line2 Continue.Havechildren tell how theendings -s and -es change wordmeanings.Thenhave

TEKS1.2B(i),1.2B(ii),1.2B(iii),1.2B(v),1.3C;ELPS4A,4B,4C

DISPLAYANDENGAGE: BlendandRead4.7 DONOTEDIT--Changesmustbemade through“File info” CorrectionKey=TX-A

BlendandRead4.7

Blend and Read  pitch pitches paths patches  baths which riches wishes  chill rush shut much  latch slush swish hitch  It is fun toplay fetchwithadog.  Which jobs canadogdo?

Know It,Show It p.108 Printable LetterCards

Grade 1 | FoundationalSkills

Module4 • Week 2

volunteers rereadselectedwords until theycan identify themquickly. 3 Review DisplayLine3,andhavechildren read itchorally. 4 Challenge Challengechildren to readLine4.Discusswordmeanings. 5 Sentences DisplayLines5–6.Callonchildren toblendselecteddecodable words.Point toeachwordaschildren read thesentenceschorally. TEACHER-LED SMALL GROUPS

You Do It INDEPENDENT PRACTICE

TEKS1.2B(i),1.2B(ii),1.2B(iii),1.2B(v),1.2C(i),1.2C(ii);ELPS4C,5A

• Option1 Dictate the followingwords: bath,wish,pitch. Havechildrenwrite the wordsand thenaddendings tonamemore thanone.Haveachildspelleachword aloud,usingBlendandRead for reference,whileotherscheck theirownwork. • Option2 HavechildrencompleteKnow It,Show Itpage108. Small-Group and Independent Work 45–60 minutes

Wrap-Up 5 minute

ELPS1E

ENGLISH LEARNER SUPPORT: Build Vocabulary

LINK TO SMALL-GROUP INSTRUCTION

REINFORCEFOUNDATIONALSKILLS Use Foxes duringsmall-group time to reviewor reinforceblendinganddecodingwords withconsonantdigraphs th and wh, trigraph -tch, and inflections -s and -es . Meetwithchildren towork through the story,orassign itas independentwork. See the lessononp.T404 . Independent and CollaborativeWork Opportunities for independent work allow students to practice and apply targeted knowledge and skills. ALLLEVELS Havechildrensharewhat theyknowabout theBlend andReadwords.Expandon theirknowledgeof thewords toconfirm orconveywordmeaning.Thenpointout thatmanywordsarenaming words (nouns)andactionwords (verbs).Use thewords inoral sentencesandpromptchildren tomakeup theirown. Talia pitches the ball.Amalswingsat the pitch .The latch isbroken. Icannot latch thegate. You can call little foxes kits, pups, and cubs. Let us call them cubs. Fox cubs nap in dens. When the sun is up, fox cubs will get up. x e o n X

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(continued) ENGLISHLANGUAGEPROFICIENCYSTANDARDS 1C usestrategic learning techniques toacquirevocabulary; 1E internalizenew basic/academic language; 2A distinguishsounds/intonationpatternsofEnglish; 2B recognizeelementsof theEnglishsoundsystem; 3A practice sounds/pronunciationofEnglishwords; 3B expand/internalize initialEnglishvocabulary; 4A learnEnglishsound-letter relationships/decode; 4B recognizedirectionalityofEnglish reading; 4C develop/comprehendbasicEnglishvocabularyandstructures; 5A useEnglishsound-letter relationships towrite; 5C spellEnglishwordswith increasingaccuracy. LITERACY CENTERS Engaging activities across a variety of instructional contexts allow students to synthesize information and solidify their understanding. Phonics

my BOOK Write-in student text offers opportunities to read, write, respond to complex texts. GENRE STUDY BOOK CLUBS Conversation about books fosters excitement about rea writing. STUDENT CHOICE LIBRARY BOOKS Self-selected reading creates an authentic opportunity fo students to practice new skills and heighten reading enga INQUIRY AND RESEARCH PROJECT Research- and inquiry-based activities are consistent wi project-based learning.

T397

START RIGHT READER In the Start Right Reader , students apply what they have learned about phonics and fluency to reading decodable texts. These texts contain only previously taught phonic elements and high-frequency words, and they feature a connected storyline or topic across the week’s texts to build students’ interest and anticipation. WORDWORK CREATIVITY CORNER DIGITAL STATION READING CORNER TEAMWORK TIME

xi

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texa

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

InDesign Notes 1. This is a list

ing ™ Texas

HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

Foster Critical Thinking and Deep Analysis of Text The my Book is a student component that provides opportunities for write-in text interactions, such as note-taking, annotating, and responding. Develop Collaborative, Self-Directed Learners Into Reading’ s WorkshopModel utilizes a gradual release of s bility that sets students on a path to mastery and success. ollaborative, ted L arners orkshopModel utilizes a of responsibility that sets th to mastery and success.

ReadingWorkshop A quick whole-group minilesson is followed by small-group a d independent application time, during which students practice collaboratively and on their own.

ReadingWorkshop A quick wh le-group minilesson is followed by small-group a independent application time, during which students practic collaboratively and on their own.

Grade 1 my Book, Book 4, Module 7

The companion Teaching Pal offers point-of-use teacher-directed instructional questions and prompts that encourage critical thinking and deep analysis of the my Book student texts.

WHOLE-GROUP MINILESSON

COLL

WHOLE-GROUP MINILESSON

DO NOT EDIT--Changes must be made through“File info” CorrectionKey=TX-A Grade 1 Teaching Pal , Book 4, Module 7

DO NOT EDIT--Changes must be made through“File info” CorrectionKey=TX-A

LANDSCAPE WITH AN ANIMAL

READ FOR UNDERSTANDING

READ FOR UNDERSTANDING

ASK: What do the illustrations show? (what to do at each step) FOLLOW-UP: Why do you think the author included these illustrations? (Possible response: to help children know what to do in each step) ANNOTATION TIP: Have children circle each of the illustrations on the page.

During a first reading of the text, guide students to respond to questions, prompts, and annotation tips designed to help them arrive at the gist of the text .

TEKS1.9D(ii),1.10C;ELPS4F,4I,4J,4K

DOK2

Learn Together 15–20 minutes

TARGETED CLOSE READ

Learn Together 15–20 minute

1

On thick paper, draw a curved line. Cut. Color one part the color of the sky. Color the other one like grass or the ocean.

2 Small-Group Instructi n Mu tiple ptions for small-group instruction allow teachers to meet the needs of div rse learners. GUIDED READINGWITH LEVELED LIBRARY Advance student ability with texts that engage and challenge readers at their instructional level. FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS DEVELOPMENT Build students’ foundational reading skills through reading decodable texts and other support activities based on need. SKILL AND STRATEGY LESSONS Provide targeted support in specific skills and strategies based on individual student needs. SUPPORT FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS Provide instruction and practice in a safe, risk-free setting, allowing English learners to experim nt with language. 60 1re_se_m7_handmade.indd 60 Text Organization Have children reread pages 60–61 to analyze how the author organizes the text. ASK: How does the author explain how to make a landscape with an animal? (The author tells the steps in order.) FOLLOW-UP: What clues help you know how the text is organized? (The numbered steps tell the order to follow.) ANNOTATION TIP: Have children circle the numbers for each step. DOK3 Stories often have a similar structure. Authors organize stories in a way that will entertain readers. Story Structure 60 Module7 TEKS1.3D,1.9D(ii),1.9D(iii),1.10A, 1.10B;ELPS4G,4J,4K 1re_tpl_m7_handmade.indd 60 ANCHOR CHART 18 Story Structure ha-cmyk_1_rnlete485441_41a.pdf 2 12/17/17 12:21 PM BEGINNING In the beginning, the characters face a problem. MIDDLE END The middle is made up of events that happen as the characters try to solve the problem. The end tells the resolution, or how the characters solve the problem.

inilesson to s of a

Whole-Group Minilesson Stud nts are introduced to skills via Anchor Charts and the shared reading of a common text.

Put together the two parts by gluing only the ends. The center part stays open. Small-Group Instruction Multiple options for small-group instruction allow teacher to meet the needs of diverse learners. GUIDED READINGWITH LEVELED LIBRARY Advance student ability with texts that engage and challenge readers at their instructional level. FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS DEVELOPMENT Build students’ foundational reading skills through reading decodable texts and other support activities based on need. SKILL AND STRATEGY LESSONS Provide targeted support in specific skills and strategies based on individual student needs. SUPPORT FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS Provide instruction and practice in a safe, risk-free setting, allowing English learners to experiment with language. 12/5/2017 12:10:11PM 3/2/18 11:30 AM

TARGETED CLOSE READ During subsequent readings, students closely analyze the text to apply skills and demonstrate knowledge. ANCHOR CHART 18: Story Struct re ha-cmyk_1_rnlete485441_41a.pdf 2 12/17/17 12:21 PM

Stories often have a similar structure. Authors organize stories in a way that will entertain readers. Story Structure

MIDDLE

The middle is made up of events that happen as the characters try to solve the problem.

BEGINNING In the beginning, the characters face a problem.

END

The end tells the resolution, or how the characters solve the problem.

All of these parts make up a story’s plot.

All of these parts make up a story’s plot.

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vi

Critical Thinking and Text An

Critical Thinking and Text Analysis

Critical Thinking and Text Analysis

N

Note Notice &

Notice &

Note

Notice &

Strategies for Close Rea

Strategies for Close Reading

Strategies for Close Reading

Develop attentive, critical reader sing the pow rful work of Kylen Beers and Robert E. Probst. Noti Note introduces Signposts and A Questions that help readers u de stand and respond to critic aspects of b th fiction and nonfi texts. SIGNPOSTS Signposts alert readers to signifi moments in a text and encourag stud nts to read closely. Fiction • Contrast & Contradictions • Words of the Wiser

Develop attentive, critical readers using the powerful work of Kylene Beers and Robert E. Probst. Notice & Note introduces Signposts and Anchor Questions that help readers understand and respond to critical aspects of both fiction and nonfiction texts. SIGNPOSTS Signposts alert readers to significant moments in a text and encourage students to read closely. Fiction • Contrast & Contradictions • Words of the Wiser b

• Aha Moment • Again & Again SIGNPOSTS Signposts alert readers to significant moments in a text and encourage students to read closely. Fiction • Contrast & Contradictions • Words of the Wiser Develop attentive, critical readers using the powerful work of Kylene Beers and Robert E. Probst. Notice & Note introd ces Signposts a Anch r Questions that help readers understand and respond to critical aspects of both fiction and nonfiction texts.

Use these notes to help students deepen their understanding as they learn to look for signposts in the text in order to create meaning. Note Notice & Use these notes to help students deepen their understanding as they learn to look for signposts in the text in order to create meaning. Note Notice & Us these notes to help s udents Note Notice &

epe their understanding as

they learn to look for signp sts in the text in order to create meaning.

DO NOT EDIT--Chan es must be made through“File info” CorrectionKey=TX-A

DO NOT EDIT--Changes must be made through“File info” CorrectionKey=TX-A

DO NOT EDIT--Changes must be made through“File info” CorrectionKey=TX-A

DO NOT EDIT--Changes must be made through“File info” CorrectionKey=TX-A

DO NOT EDIT--Changes must be made through“File info” CorrectionKey=TX-A

DO NOT EDIT--Changes must be made through“File info” CorrectionKey=TX-A

Note

Note

Notice &

Notice &

Numbers and Stats • Remind children that when an author uses numbers in a text, they should stop to notice and note. Explain that understanding why the author included these numbers can help them summarize. • Havechildren explainwhythey mightusethisstrategyonpages60– 61. (Theauthorusesnumberstoshow theorder inwhichtodosomething.) • Remind them of the Anchor Question: What does this make me wonder about? (P ssible response: How else could the author have written the steps if she didn’t use numbers?)

Numbers and Stats • Remind children that when an author uses numbers in a text, they should stop to notice and note. Explain that understanding why the author included these numbers can help them summarize. • Havechildren explainwhythey mightusethisstrategyonpages60– 61. (Theauthorusesnumberstoshow theorder inwhichtodosomething.) • Remind them of the Anchor Question: What does this make me wonder about? (Possible response: How else could the author have written the steps if she didn’t use numbers?) Note o

3

3

Notice & Ge another piece of thick paper. Draw and color an animal. Then cut it out. Cut a strip of thick paper. Glue the end of the strip to the back of the animal. Let it dry.

Get another piece of thick paper. Draw and color an animal. Then cut it out. Cut a strip of thick paper. Glue the end of the strip to the back of the animal. Let it dry. Get another piece of thick paper. Draw and color an animal. Then cut it out. Cut a strip of thick paper. Glue the end of the strip to the back of the animal. Let it dry. 3

• Aha Moment • Again & Again

Numbers and Stats • Remindchildren thatwhenan authorusesnumbers ina text, they shouldstop tonoticeandnote. Explain thatunderstandingwhy the author included thesenumberscan help themsummarize. • Havechildren explainwhythey

• Aha Moment • Again & Again

• Memory Moment • Tough Questions

• Memory Moment • Tough Questions

Then put the strip through the open part of the landscape. Attach it with a paper fastener. Make your animal walk along the landscape by moving the strip back and forth. Then put the strip through the open part of the landscape. Attach it with a paper fastener. Make your animal walk along the landscape by moving the strip back and forth. 4 4

4

TEKS1.6B,1.7D;ELPS4G,4K mightusethisstrategyonpages60– 61. (Theauthorusesnumberstoshow theorder inwhichtodosomething.) • Remindthem of theAnchor Question: Whatdoesthismake mewonderabout? (Possible response:Howelsecould theauthor havewritten thesteps ifshedidn’t usenumbers?) T en put the strip through the open art of t e landscape. Attach it with paper fastener. Make your anim l walk along the landscape by movi g the strip back and forth.

• Memory Moment • Tough Questions

Nonfiction • Contrast & Contradictions • Extreme or Absolute Language • Numbers and Stats • Quoted Words • Word Gaps

Nonfiction • Contrast & Contradictions • Extreme or Absolute Language • Numbers and Stats • Quoted Words • Word Gaps

Nonfiction • Contrast & Contradictions • Extreme or Absolute Language • Numbers and Stats • Quoted Words • Word Gaps DOK2

TEKS1.6B,1.7D;ELPS4G,4K

DOK2

TEKS1.6B,1.7D;ELPS4G,4K

READ FOR UNDERSTANDING

READ FOR UNDERSTANDING DOK2

Summarize MODEL SUMMARIZING

Summarize MODEL SUMMARIZING READFORUNDERSTANDING

THINK ALOUD When I read, I ask myself, what have I learned so far? I can summarize the important details from the words and pictures. I have learned you can use paper and other materials to make an animal that moves through a landscape.

THINK ALOUD When I read, I ask myself, what have I learned so far? I can summarize the important details from the words and pictures. I have learned you can use paper and other materials to make an animal that moves through a landscape.

Summarize MODELSUMMARIZING

TEKS1.7D;ELPS4F,4G,4I THINKALOUD When I read, I askmyself,whathave I learnedso far? Icansummarize the important details from thewordsandpictures. I have learnedyoucanusepaperand othermaterials tomakeananimal thatmoves througha landscape.

TEKS1.7D;ELPS4F,4G,4I

DOK2

DOK2

61

61

TEKS1.7D;ELPS4F,4G,4I

DOK2

61

1re_se_m7_handmade.indd 61

1re_se_m7_handmade.indd 61

12/5/2017 12:10:13PM

12/5/2017 12:10:13PM

Handmade 61

Handmade 61

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12/5/2017 12:10:13PM

Handmade 61

1re_tpl_m7_handmade.indd 61

3/2/18 11:30 AM

1re_tpl_m7_handmade.indd 61

3/2/18 11:30 AM

1re_tpl_m7_handmade.indd 61

3/2/18 11:30AM

Kylen Beers and Robert E. Probst

Kylene Beers and Robert E. Probst

Kylene Beers and Robert E. Probst

xiii

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texa

Welcome to HMH Into Reading ™ Texas

InDesign Notes 1. This is a list

InDesign Notes 1. This is a list

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