AZCOMP Technologies IT September 2019

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The State of Cybercrime in 2019 PAGE 1 Life Hacks for Your Gadget Gripes PAGE 2 A Company Immune From Cold Sales PAGE 3 The World’s Most Innovative Office Chair PAGE 3 AZCOMP Leadership Library: ‘Digital Minimalism’ PAGE 3 Innovation Where You’d Least Expect It PAGE 4

A BETTER WAY TO SWING FOR THE FENCES

By Aimee

As any lifelong fan will tell you, baseball is a game of tradition. The record books date back to the 1800s, and, while the game has advanced in certain ways, it’s largely stayed the same overall. Then, it comes as no surprise that, until very recently, the design of baseball bats had remained unchanged for over a century. Swinging a baseball bat is a full-body activity. You generate power with your lower body through your hips and control the bat using your arms and torso. When you make less than ideal contact, the energy from the ball can send pain shooting up your wrists and forearms. When Bruce Leinert was using an ax one day, he realized he could build a better baseball bat. “I started to pretend I was swinging a baseball bat instead of an ax as I was striking the tree,” he recalls. “I said, ‘This is the answer to the problem of the uncomfortable handle of the bat.’” The ax’s tapered grip conformed to Leinert’s hand better than a traditional bat knob. Not long after, Axe Bat was born. After gaining traction in smaller leagues and youth programs, ax- handled bats became popular with MLB standouts like George Springer of the Astros and Mookie Betts of the Red Sox. Axe Bat now licenses out their handle technology to four companies

that also supply big leaguers with bats. “The ergonomics of it make complete sense; it’s completely logical,” says Jared Smith, co-founder of Victus Sports, one of the companies that makes ax- handled bats. One of AZCOMP’s core values, called “We Surf Jaws,” inspires us to innovate and improve. As with any great innovation, especially one in a workplace resistant to change, the Axe Bat had to take some time to find an audience. Once players got used to it and heard about its benefits from their teammates, the word spread. Now, it’s one of the most talked-about equipment evolutions in baseball history, all because one man dared to ask, “Why don’t we do this a better way?” If that’s not innovating and improving, I don’t know what is.

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