Bader Scott Injury Lawyers - June 2020

THE BADER SCOTT REPORT

3384 PEACHTREE ROAD NE, SUITE 500 ATLANTA, GA 30326 (404) 888-8888 BADERSCOTT.COM

06 .2020

REMEMBERING EVERYTHING I LEARNED FROM MY DAD BASEBALL, LIFE LESSONS, AND THE BEST MAN I’VE EVER KNOWN

H ello everyone, Seth Bader here! It’s been a while since I sat down to write one of these newsletters, but Luis passed the baton back to me this month so I could talk about someone incredibly important to me: my dad, Daniel Bader. Father’s Day is coming up in a few weeks, so my dad has been on my mind a lot lately. Actually, my dad is my hero, so there’s never really a time when he isn’t on my mind, even though he passed away a few years ago. I’ve worked every day of my life to follow in his footsteps. He was a doctor, and I’m a lawyer, but I see a lot of parallels between our lines of work, and the life lessons he taught me are my guiding principles. When I was little, my dad used to read me the book “Here Comes the Strikeout” by Leonard Kessler. It’s about a kid named Bobby who loves baseball but can’t manage to hit the ball. In an effort to get better, he asks his friends for help. One of them offers him a lucky ball; another suggests his lucky bat. None of the charms make a difference. In fact, Bobby doesn’t get any better until he brings the problem to his mother, who tells him, “Bobby, you have to go and practice. Just go out there and keep practicing.” After taking her advice to heart, Bobby hits a game-winning home run. The book ends with the line, “Lucky hats won’t do it, lucky bats won’t do it — only hard work will do it.” My dad loved that book, and he lived by its final quote. Growing up poor in Brooklyn, New York, my dad valued work ethic, integrity, and the relentless pursuit of knowledge. He became a self-made man, serving in the Air Force, putting himself through college and medical school without any help from his family, and eventually becoming a neurologist with his own successful practice. And he did all of that after his service in the Air Force left him partially blind. Through everything, my dad never once got bitter about the hand life dealt him or lost sight of his goal: to help as many people as he could. When I was young, sometimes I’d to go with my dad to the hospital and join him on his rounds. There, I saw close up how compassionate he was, how much he cared about his patients, and how he always put them first. There’s no question that he inspired

me to become a lawyer and start Bader Scott Injury Lawyers. I don’t help people in the same way he did, but my practice is all about the clients, just as his was all about the patients.

When we weren’t reading “Here Comes the Strikeout,” my dad and I were living it. As a kid, I loved baseball just like Bobby, so in the evenings and on weekends, the two of us were always out in the yard hitting balls. I learned the value of hard work during those summers as the bat put calluses on my hands. Looking back, those long nights are proof that Dad was a dedicated father to me and my brothers, Adam and Noah. We each had our own interests as children, and he always found time to work with each of us and help us pursue our passions. As a father myself now, I truly respect that and strive to do the same for my daughters — no hobby, dream, or interest is too small for my attention.

“Through everything, my dad never once got bitter about the hand life dealt him or lost sight of his goal: to help as many people as he could.”

My dad was one of the best men I’ve ever known. He taught me that you can accomplish anything with enough time, passion, patience, and humility, and it’s a lesson I’ll never forget. Though we won’t be able to spend Father’s Day together, I’ll be thinking of him, just like I do every other day of my life.

Wishing you all safety and good health,

–Seth Bader, Founder and Owner

(404) 888-8888 • 1

THE BEST WAYS TO HELP LOCAL NONPROFITS IN CHALLENGING TIMES

Over the past several months, families, businesses, and nonprofits have had to navigate life in this challenging “new normal,” and it can be hard to support your favorite nonprofits when times are tough. Here are a few ways you can help these important entities, even when you don’t have resources to spare right now. DONATE While many people donate generously during the holiday season, remember that nonprofits need donations throughout the year, and different nonprofits need different things. A monetary donation can often go a long way, but never feel obligated to give money, especially when your budget may be tight. Instead, consider cleaning out your closet. What clothes, shoes, or other accessories can you part with? What about

dishware or small appliances? When you clean out your home and donate unused items, you benefit those in the community who need them most. VOLUNTEER In a time of social distancing, volunteering may be discouraged, but nonprofits still need volunteers to operate. The good news is that many nonprofits need volunteers for positions that maintain social distance, such as driving. Food banks and kitchens need drivers to pick up donations or ingredients from donors and to deliver food to people in need, such as the elderly or those with disabilities. ADVOCATE Even if you don’t have time or resources to give, you can become an advocate for

important causes around your community. While it might not seem like much, sharing information about local nonprofits on social media can make a genuine difference. Nonprofits need exposure, which is greatly boosted through community support. Sharing useful information about nonprofits — or sharing their posts — increases their visibility so more people will take action.

MEET KELSEY WATERS THE GLUE THAT KEEPS US TOGETHER!

In good times and bad, it’s up to our project and procedures coordinator Kelsey Waters to keep our staff here at Bader Scott working together and on the same page. If you’re a client, odds are you’ve never met Kelsey — she works behind the scenes, putting out policies and messaging to the company — but you’ve definitely benefited from her hard work. “I create and draft any policies and procedures that the firm may need, from the dress code all the way to things that are department-specific. I also host monthly policy and procedure trainings and department trainings,” Kelsey says. When we started incorporating remote work and social distancing into our routines, Kelsey was instrumental in getting that messaging out to everyone on staff. She’s putting in 110% right now to make sure we all continue to stay healthy and safe. “There are constantly new things going out, and I’m learning new things,” Kelsey says. “It’s a new time for us as we’ve never done remote work before, but Luis and Seth have definitely set us up for success in this

situation. I feel blessed to have all of the leaders on board doing what’s best for the employees.”

Although Kelsey doesn’t actually work cases, she has a passion for law that helped her fit in with the Bader Scott family right away. Before attending the University of West Georgia to study marketing, she took criminal law and justice courses all through high school, and it was one of her favorite subjects. Now, she gets to work in that field every day! When she isn’t working, Kelsey spends her downtime hanging out with her boyfriend, Bailey, and their little Yorkie, Bentley, who has been getting a lot of extra walks lately. She also loves home decor and fills her remaining hours revamping furniture with her mom and grandma.

“I have a dresser waiting for me to refinish it this weekend!” she says.

Kelsey, we love your passion and enthusiasm, and we truly appreciate your hard work. From the whole Bader Scott family, thank you for all that you do!

2 • BADERSCOTT.COM

THE UGLY TRUTH ABOUT NURSING HOME ABUSE AND WHAT YOU CAN DO TO PROTECT YOUR LOVED ONES

In the last few months, nursing homes have made national news as hot spots for the coronavirus. Because these facilities are home to so many vulnerable, elderly people who live in close proximity to each other, they’ve sadly become the sites of some of the worst coronavirus outbreaks in Washington and New York. With these tragedies in mind, many of our clients and friends have started to question the care their loved ones are getting in nursing homes — and we can only consider that a good thing. Heartbreakingly, here at Bader Scott, we’re all too aware that the coronavirus isn’t the only awful thing plaguing American nursing homes. Nursing home abuse (which encompasses physical, emotional, financial, and sexual abuse as well as neglect) is also an all-too-frequent reality. In September 2019, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (AJC) published a three-part investigation into nursing home abuse in the private-pay sector. It collected and analyzed thousands of documents covering 2015–2018 for homes with at least 25 beds and found that many facilities were understaffed and relied on poor-quality or underpaid caregivers.

In one home in Savannah, for example, only two people were on staff to care for 28 residents. That left residents at risk of choking when eating unsupervised, and one reportedly fell asleep while eating. In Canton, a resident who needed two caregivers to help them walk was forced to make do with only one. They ended up suffering two fractures. This reveals that even when caregivers have the best of intentions, nursing home abuse can happen — and the problems are only compounded when caregivers are underqualified, unmotivated, unstable, or sleep-deprived from working second jobs. If you have a loved one in a nursing home and have seen evidence of abuse or are concerned about their care, you can protect them by digging into the facility’s history and engaging a lawyer if necessary. A good place to start is the facility search page maintained by the AJC: AJC.com/senior-care-quality- report . You can also look at court records to see if the home in question has been sued for negligence or wrongful death. If you find something, our experienced nursing home abuse attorneys here at Bader Scott are ready to fight for compensation on your loved one’s behalf.

PALEO SAUSAGE FRITTATA

TAKE A BREAK

INGREDIENTS

• • • • • •

3 tbsp coconut oil

1 lb mild Italian sausage

1 medium sweet potato, peeled and grated

4 green onions, diced

10 eggs, whisked

Black pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS

1. In a large ovenproof skillet, heat coconut oil over medium heat. 2. Crumble sausage into the skillet and cook until browned.

3. Add sweet potato and cook until tender. 4. Add green onion and sauté for 2–3 minutes 5. Spread this mixture evenly throughout the skillet. Pour eggs over mixture and sprinkle black pepper over top. 6. Cook without stirring for 3 minutes or until bubbly. 7. Transfer skillet to oven and cook under broiler on low until frittata is cooked through. Inspired by SarahFragoso.com

SUMMER BARBECUE SUNSHINE GEMINI

FATHER’S DAY BEACH HOT PEARL

ROSE SOLSTICE

GRILL PRIDE

(404) 888-8888 • 3

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

3384 PEACHTREE ROAD NE, SUITE 500 ATLANTA, GA 30326 (404) 888-8888 BADERSCOTT.COM

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

1 2 2 3 3 4

Baseball, Life Lessons, and the Best Man I’ve Ever Known

Help Local Nonprofits in Challenging Times

A Peek Behind the Bader Scott Curtain

The Ugly Truth About Nursing Home Abuse

Paleo Sausage Frittata

Botanical Gardens in the US

OUR NATION’S BOTANICAL GARDENS LIVING MUSEUMS

In 1842, the Wilkes Expedition returned from its trek across the Pacific Ocean on behalf of the United States government, having visited parts of Portugal, Brazil, Antarctica, and Fiji. Among the specimens the explorers brought back from their travels were collections of plants gathered from around the world — just what the young nation needed to start its very first botanical garden. George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams had a shared dream of creating a national botanical garden, but the idea didn’t really get off the ground until the Wilkes Expedition brought back the garden’s first plants. The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) was established in Washington, D.C., and four of the plants on display there today are part of the original collection brought back from the expedition. Since it’s not always possible to go on vacation and visit far-off gardens, many botanical gardens around the world have started bringing the flora right to you with virtual tours. In addition to the USBG, which offers virtual tours at USBG.gov/take-virtual-tour, check out

these other gardens that allow you to explore without having to leave your home.

CHICAGO BOTANIC GARDEN In the spring, the Chicago Botanic Garden staff invited virtual visitors to join them for a nature moment. Garden staff shared images from around the 17 gardens kept there. The Chicago Botanic Garden continues to wow with virtual tours that, thanks to Google’s technology, make you feel as if you’re really there. Start your tour at ChicagoBotanic.org. WADDESDON MANOR AND GARDENS This historic site across the pond in England gives visitors detailed virtual views of the Waddesdon Manor and its stunning gardens. Each day at Waddesdon Gardens, the staff designates a specific area as a “Silent Space,” where visitors can go to disconnect and find peace. The Gardens also created a special message for their virtual visitors that we can all take to heart: “We encourage you to find a space in your garden or in your home that feels peaceful and designate a time each day to enjoy a quiet moment of reflection.” To see this historic site for yourself, visit Waddesdon.org.uk.

4 • BADERSCOTT.COM

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4

Made with FlippingBook Ebook Creator