Premier Dental April 2019

PREMIER DENTAL N EWS L E T T E R

609.298.1124 WWW.BORDENTOWNDENTIST.COM

EDITION 3

The Connections Between Your Mouth and The Rest of Your Body DO I REALLY NEED TO FLOSS?

VISIT OUR OF- FICE AT: 321 FARNSWORTH AVENUE, BORDENTOWN, NJ 08505 609-298-1124 OFFICE STAFF: PATIENT COORDINATORS MICHELE JOHANNA DENTAL ASSISTANT CATHLEEN

You may have heard this common refrain: Brush your teeth twice per day, floss once per day, and keep your regular cleaning appointments. Some patients think this is overkill and that their dentist or hygienist is just too nitpicky. Many wonder, “Does it really matter if I brush in the morning or forget to run floss through my teeth?”

professionals, when you’re not a dental expert, it’s hard to know what you’re looking at when you examine the mouth. More

For the sake of your body, yes!

medical experts are starting to refer their patients to dentists for further examination and testing.

Many people already know that bad bacteria in the mouth eventually causes periodontal disease. But more and more research indicates that the mouth is also the gateway for bad bacteria to enter the rest of your body. The bacteria in your mouth eventually enter your blood stream and digestive tract, creating inflammation or infection wherever they land. Research has discovered that periodontal disease — an infection in the mouth that destroys the jaw bone and inflames the gums — is also linked to stroke, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, osteoporosis, pregnancy issues, cardiac complications, and kidney and liver problems. Conversely, these illnesses can also have adverse effects in the mouth. For instance, kidney disease can lead to bad breath or a fishy, ammonia smell wafting from your mouth, and acid reflux can sometimes cause erosion of tooth enamel. Issues in the mouth and the rest of the body can influence one another, leading to worse overall health. Traditionally, dentistry and medicine have been considered separate fields with little to no connection to each other. This thinking has changed. While research is ongoing, recent discoveries have underscored the importance of medical practitioners and dentists working together to find underlying systemic problems in their patients and educate patients on the connection between the two areas. In defense of medical

At Premier Dental, we regularly check for periodontal disease. Controlling

periodontal disease means less bad bacteria in the mouth and throughout your body. We also do visual oral cancer screenings as part of your regular cleaning appointments. These appointments also include X-rays, pocket measurements, and checking for symptoms that you might not even know exist. For instance, diabetes is often first suspected at the dentist office, and dentists will commonly recommend biopsies from lesions on the cheek and tongue if they suspect skin abnormalities or oral cancer. So remember, when we recommend brushing twice daily, flossing, and scheduling regular check-ups, we’re not just being paranoid. We’ve seen the connections between abnormalities in the mouth and certain diseases in the body. That’s why we are so particular about checking everything. To us, being meticulous makes you healthier. If you’re curious to learn more about how we can help you, give our office a call at 609-298-1124. —Hema Gopal, DMD

HYGIENISTS

CHARLENE LORI PRACTICE MANAGER PETER

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