CellCheck Newsletter JULY 2017 FINAL

JULY EDITION 2017

CellCheck ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND NEWSLETTER Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

CELLCHECK PROGRAMME NEWS

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www.AnimalHealthIreland.ie

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR P4

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH P6

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SERVICE PROVIDER NOTES

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27

AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of our stakeholders to the CellCheck programme.

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27

CELLCHECK PROGRAMME

July News

Finola McCoy, Programme Manager

W elcome to this month’s edition of the CellCheck newsletter. This month, our guest contributor Katie Nanne, a Veterinary Practitioner working in Limerick, gives us a great overview of summer mastitis- why it happens, how to prevent it and what to do if you have a case of it. We also take a look at exactly how much extra money the improvement in SCC nationally has added to our pockets, both directly to farmers and to the broader industry. Remember less mastitis means more profit, and that profit is worth collecting, at any milk price!

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • JULY EDITION 2017

Guest Contributor

Sun, green lush fields and summer mastitis…

Katie Nanne – Veterinary Practitioner, Limerick

J uly, August and September are the months of the year we tend to enjoy the most. Spring is over and summer has started. But we are not the only ones enjoying it-the larvae of the Sheep Head fly ( Hydrotoae Irritans ) favour this period too, to develop into adult flies and emerge. Although other types of flies have not been ruled out, it is this particular fly which is thought to be the main mode of transmission of summer mastitis. It lives in bushes and trees and flies out to feed on cattle when wind speeds are low and when it’s dry. It usually lands on the cow’s legs, abdomen or udder. They irritate the cow and she will try to swat them away with her tail, and this explains why summer mastitis is more common in the front quarters. The fly prefers to feed on damaged skin sites, like teat sores. It ingests the bacteria commonly found on these sores and regurgitates them at its next feed, thus facilitating the spread of bacteria that cause summer mastitis. A healthy teat has a properly functioning teat canal which acts as a barrier, preventing bacteria from entering the cow. At drying off a seal should be formed in the teat canal to naturally prevent infection. It can take several weeks for this seal to close the teat canal fully, and in some instances (usually when the teat end is damaged or in poor condition) this seal does not completely form, leaving the quarter vulnerable to infection. This is why infections like summer mastitis are mostly seen in dry stock or cows in late pregnancy during summer. Sometimes it is seen in heifers or lactating animals, though in lactating animals the

infection is usually prevented as bacteria are flushed out at each milking.

A ‘classic’ case of summer mastitis has a hot, hard and swollen quarter, often with a tense, enlarged teat. The quarter is painful and when drawn a foul smelling, thick, clotted secretion or pus comes out.

At least six types of organisms have been found in relation to summer mastitis, of which the main two are bacteria; Truperella pyogenes (previously known as Arcanobacter pyogenes) and Streptococcus dysgalatiae. The latter is commonly found on the teat skin, particularly when the surface integrity of the teat is compromised by chaps, cuts, machine damage, pox virus, teat hurts and flies, hence it plays a major role in summer mastitis. T. pyogenes is often responsible for the foul smell as it tends to form an abscess when inside the udder.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • JULY EDITION 2017

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR A ‘classic’ case of summer mastitis has a hot, hard and swollen quarter, often with a tense, enlarged teat. The quarter is painful and when drawn a foul smelling, thick, clotted secretion or pus comes out. Usually the cow is not sick, but she could appear lame and may even have swollen hocks. If left untreated the disease could progress with the cow developing symptoms like fever, loss of appetite; she may abort or even die. When it goes unnoticed, the cow may recover and it then only becomes apparent after calving on finding a blind teat, so prompt treatment is important. The main bacteria involved are sensitive to penicillin, thus these types of antibiotics are often used for treatment. Seekadvicefromyourveterinarypractitioner. Frequently an abscess is present, making it difficult to

cure with mastitis tubes alone. Thus treatment with a course of injectable antibiotics is indicated along with frequent stripping (at least 3 times per day). Stripping it is the best way to try and prevent ‘losing’ the quarter, although this often still happens. Stripping also helps in preventing an abscess from bursting out through the side. If this happens flush the area with an antiseptic solution to keep the wound open for drainage. Prevention relies on maintaining good teat condition, having a good dry cow therapy protocol including the use of sealants, fly prevention (leave tails long and clean, and use fly repellents). Where possible graze cattle in open fields on ground exposed to wind and away from bushes or trees during warm dry weather.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • JULY EDITION 2017

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH

Less Mastitis = More Profit….for all! O ne of the key CellCheck messages to be presented at the upcoming Teagasc Moorepark Open Day, will be about the increased profitability that improving mastitis control and milk quality brings. Recent Teagasc analysis of the national bulk tank somatic cell count (SCC) database shows the magnitude of this financial return for the whole industry. The national bulk tank SCC database captures volume and SCC information for almost 95% of the milk supplied in Ireland, and currently contains three consecutive years of data, 2013-2015 (Fig 1). In 2015, 64% of milk supplied had an SCC <200,000 cells/mL. Looking in closer detail at the SCC distribution of all milk supplied in 2015, economic analysis shows that it was worth an extra €38 million to the dairy industry in increased milk value, when compared to the SCC distribution in 2013. [Click here] for previously published tips

Figure 1. Proportion of herds and milk volume with SCC <200,000 cells/mL

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER JULY EDITION 2017

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH

This extra milk value yielded gains of 3:1 to farmers and processors i.e. €27m to farmers and €11m to processors.

The increased value to farmers is mainly due to increased yields as a result of lower SCC. The financial benefits of a lower SCC should not be underestimated. For example, at a milk price of 30c/L if a 100-cow herd reduces its SCC from 350,000 cells/mL to 250,000 cells/mL, the farm would generate almost €4,000 extra profit. An additional €8,200 extra profit could be gained if the reduction was from 250,000 cells/mL to 150,000 cells/mL.

To see how much more profit you could earn with a lower herd SCC, use the CostCheck interactive calculator. CostCheck allows you to estimate the potential increase in profit from reducing the incidence of mastitis (both clinical cases and cows with high SCC) on your dairy farm, using your own data. The CostCheck calculator can be downloaded from the Animal Health Ireland website ( www.animalhealthireland.ie ) or the Teagasc website ( www. teagasc.ie )

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • JULY EDITION 2017

Service Provider Notes

Delivery of second phase of CellCheck Farmer Workshops

S cheduling of all the CellCheck Farmer Workshops under the KT programme was completed last month, and delivery of this second phase of workshops also commenced. Approximately 140 workshops will be delivered to discussion groups around the country before the end of the year, so plenty of activity on the horizon. Workshop delivery packs have been put together, and will be issued to all KT group facilitators in advance of your scheduled workshop date. Don’t forget that the USB stick that you received as part of your CellCheck Stage 2 Service Provider Training pack contains additional powerpoint slides, that focus specifically on Dry Cow Therapy. As the year progresses and we get closer to the dry period, you may find it useful to include this material in the course of the workshop presentation. Alternatively, some workshop delivery teams found it useful to include this new material when delivering a workshop to farmers that may have participated in one in the past, albeit 3 or 4 years before. If you are going to include this material, make sure that you have discussed it with all delivery teammembers before the workshop, so that there are no surprises on the day! Finally, don’t forget to have a quick look at the CellCheck Farmer Workshop refresher video, for some reminders and tips about time management, materials and maximising interaction with your farmers.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • JULY EDITION 2017

CELLCHECK REGIONAL COORDINATORS

A Resource and Point of Contact for CellCheck Activities in your Area

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Tom Starr 087 6697010

Mícheal Guinan 086 3511852 micheal.guinan@aurivo.ie Mayo/Sligo Aurivo

tstarr@arrabawn.ie Tipperary/Limerick National Co-op

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John Fitzpatrick 086 0426567

Sean McCarthy 066 7163200 sean.mccarthy@kerry.ie Kerry/Clare Kerry Agribusiness

fitzpatrickj@glanbia.ie Kilkenny/Laois/Carlow/ Kildare/Dublin Glanbia

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Sinead Treanor streanor@carbery.com 023 8822369 West Cork Carbery Group

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Andrew O’Neill 086 1836505 aoneill@tipperary-coop.ie Tipperary Tipperary Co-Op

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Tom Downes 087 2564669

Denis Guiry 086 8098639 dguiry@dairygold.ie Cork/Tipperary/Limerick Dairygold

downest@lakeland.ie Longford/Monaghan Lakeland Dairies

Brendan Dillon 087 2626851 BrDillon@glanbia.ie

Cork/Waterford/ Wexford/Wicklow Glanbia

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • JULY EDITION 2017

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