Outpatient PT_Shoulder, Elbow, Wrist Pain

Home Safety Checklist for Fall Hazards This room-by-room checklist highlights possible fall hazards. If you mark “Yes” to any of these questions, consider the suggestions to help reduce your chances of falling. HOME SAFETY CHECKLIST FOR FALL HAZARDS This room-by-room checklist highlights possible fall hazards. If you mark “Yes” to any of these questions, consider the suggestions to help reduce your chances of falling.

Living Areas LIVING AREA

Bathroom BATHROOM

Possible Hazard

Yes Suggestions

Possible Hazard

Yes Suggestions

Remove damaged floor coverings or secure them well with double-sided tape, nails, etc. It’s important to have a flat, sturdy walkway. The best thing to do is to remove throw rugs. Put double-sided tape on them so they don’t slip. Higher chairs and armrests are helpful for easing into a sitting position. Keep a phone nearby so you don’t have to get up quickly if the phone rings. Cordless phones are helpful. Keep a phone close to the floor in order to call for help in the event of a fall. Tape cords and wires to the wall or have an electrician install additional outlets. Moving the lamp closer to the bed or attaching a light to the headboard reduces the chances of falling. A longer phone xtension cord or a cordless phone within easy reach of the bed can reduce the chances of falling. Remove clutter from walkways to avoid tripping. Store glasses within reach of the bed. It’s best to have a straight path, clear of furniture. Rearrange furniture to provide for obstacle-free walking. Install longer cords or link ceiling lights/fans to a light switch on the wall to eliminate the need to look and reach up. Cords are a tripping hazard. Reroute cords so they do not cross walking paths and/or get an electrician to install additional outlets. Remove clutter from walkways to reduce the chances of tripping over it. Place a portable commode near the bed to eliminate nighttime trips to the bathroom.

Do carpets, rugs, and floor coverings have frayed corners or rolled-up edges? Are there throw rugs in walkways? Are chairs and couches low to the ground? Is it necessary to get up to answer the phone? Possible Hazard Is there a long reach from the bed to a light? Do you have to walk over or around electrical cords or wires? Are there newspapers, boxes, shoes, etc. on the floor? Is it necessary to get out of bed or reach far to get to the telephone? Is it necessary to get out of bed or reach far to get eyeglasses? Are there telephone, light, or television cords running along the floor on the walkways? Is there clutter (clothes, shoes, books, etc.) on the floor? Is it common to get up many times during the night to use the bathroom? Do you need to walk around furniture to get through the living area? Do you have to reach up to pull cords to lights or ceiling fans?

Is the path from the bedroom to the bathroom dark? Are towel racks used to balance or grab onto while getting in or out of the bathtub/shower?

Nightlights can be helpful in lighting the way.

Towel racks may not be mounted well enough to support a person’s weight. Install grab rails in the appropriate places. A shower seat allows older adults to shower without getting tired of standing or risking a fall because of dizziness.

Bedroom

Is it difficult to stand during a shower?

Yes Suggestions

Is the shower floor and/or bathtub slippery?

Install non-skid strips or a non-slip mat.

Patch leaks with caulk or other appropriate materials. Wipe up water immediately to prevent slipping. Use a bath mat with a slip resistant backing. A shower/bath storage unit that attaches to the side of the tub or shower wall can reduce the need to reach or turn around to get things. It may be helpful to raise the seat and/or install handrails. Replace the toilet with a higher toilet and/or install handrails.

Is there any water on the floor after a bath/shower? Are there leaks from the tub/ shower? Is it necessary to reach far or turn around to get towels, shampoo, and soap? Is it difficult to get on and off the toilet?

October is National Physical Therapy Month!

KITCHEN

BEDROOM Bedroom

Kitchen

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www.moveforwardpt.com

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Possible Hazard

Yes Suggestions

Possible Hazard

Yes Suggestions

1111 North Fairfax Street Alexandria, VA 22314-1488

Are there floor mats or rugs in the kitchen? Is it necessary to reach far, bend over, or climb on a stool to get commonly-used kitchen items and foods? Is there liquid, food, grease, or other clutter on the floor?

Remove throw rugs or secure them to the floor with slip-resistant backing. Rearrange cupboards and drawers so that items used most often are waist high. Use a sturdy step stool with a grab bar to reach items stored overhead. Never use a chair as a step stool. Sweep often and wipe up liquid immediately to reduce the chances of slipping.

Is there a long reach from the bed to a light?

Moving the lamp closer to the bed or attaching a light to the headboard reduces the chances of falling. A longer phone extension cord or a cordless phone within easy reach of the bed can reduce the chances of falling. Cords are a tripping hazard. Reroute cords so they do not cross walking paths and/or get an electrician to install additional outlets. Remove clutter from walkways to reduce the chances of tripping over it. Place a portable commode near the bed to eliminate nighttime trips to the bathroom. Store glasses within reach of the bed.

For information about physical therapy or to find a physical therapist near where you work or live, visit www.moveforwardpt.com

Is it necessary to get out of bed or reach far to get to the telephone?

Is it necessary to get out of bed or reach far to get eyeglasses? Are there telephone, light, or television cords running along the floor on the walkways? Is there clutter (clothes, shoes, books, etc.) on the floor? Is it common to get up many times during the night to use the bathroom?

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www.moveforwardpt.com

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Kitchen

Possible Hazard

Yes Suggestions

Are there floor mats or rugs in the kitchen? Is it necessary to reach far, bend over, or climb on a stool to get commonly-used kitchen items and foods? Is there liquid, food, grease, or other clutter on the floor?

Remove throw rugs or secure them to the floor with slip-resistant backing. Rearrange cupboards and drawers so that items used most often are waist high. Use a sturdy step stool with a grab bar to reach items stored overhead. Never use a chair as a step stool. Sweep often and wipe up liquid immediately to reduce the chances of slipping.

www.outpatientpt.com

www.moveforwardpt.com

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www.outpatientpt.com

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