RESEARCHER FALL 2018

CAPSULES

THE FUTURE OF FLORIDIANHEATWAVES

Temperatures as high as 117 degrees Fahrenheit swept across India in May 2015, causing widespread power outages and killing at least 2,500 people. By the late 21st century, if atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations reach worst- case projections, Floridians could experi- ence summer heatwaves three times more frequently, and each heatwave could last six times longer than at present, says Meteorology Professor Shawn M. Milrad of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. “More extreme heatwaves in Florida would have profound impacts on human health as well as the state’s economy,” Milrad notes. For the time period 2070 to 2099, if atmo- spheric carbon dioxide concentra- tions rise two to Meteorology Professor Shawn Milrad “Floridian heatwaves and extreme precipitation: future climate projections,” published in the journal Climate Dynamics. The research — conducted with recent Embry-Riddle graduate Ajay Raghavendra (now at the University at Albany); undergraduate student Shealynn R. Cloutier-Bisbee; and Aiguo Dai at the University at Albany and the National Center for Atmospheric Research — looked at temperatures and precipitation levels at present versus under the highest-emissions scenario set forth by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for Florida. In a very high-level CO2 emissions scenario, precipitation would also increase following heatwaves, though this impact might vary from region to region. “A much warmer atmosphere would hold more moisture and bring heavier downpours,” Milrad says. / GINGER PINHOLSTER three times above the current level of 410 parts per million, heatwaves could also get hotter, rising by 7 to 10 degrees F, Milrad reported in a peer-reviewed article,

Rodrigo Firmo, MBA candidate, and Grace McSween, a senior aerospace engineering student minoring in human factors and flight, check out a light- sport aircraft.

Flying the Crowded Skies RESEARCH CONFIRMS THAT EVERY SPACE LAUNCH TAKES A FINANCIAL TOLL ON AIRLINES

RESEARCH.ERAU.EDU T he SpaceX Falcon Heavy — the most powerful operational rocket in the world — streaked across a brilliant blue sky on Feb. 6, 2018, triggering wild applause from spectators lucky enough to witness America’s latest aerospace achievement. When Falcon Heavy’s two side boosters successfully returned to Earth, proving

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