AHI Newsletter Q2 2018 FINAL

ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health SUMMER EDITION Stakeholders NEWSLETTER

Events and Media

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Cosme Sanchez-Miguel Johne's Disease Technical Working Group Siobhan Corry Johne's Disease Technical Working Group Focus on TWG Members

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AHI Programme Updates P11

CellCheck • BVD • Johne’s Disease Beef HealthCheck • IBR

Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27 Phone 071 9671928 Email nmorgan@animalhealthireland.ie www.AnimalHealthIreland.ie

AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of our stakeholders.

Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27 Phone 071 9671928 Emailnmorgan@animalhealthireland.ie

CONTENTS

04 05 10 11 12 15 17 19

Introduction

Events And Media

Focus on Technical Working Group Members

CellCheck

BVD

Johne’s Disease

Beef HealthCheck

IBR

Introduction

Dr David Graham, CEO, Animal Health Ireland

T he second quarter of 2018 has been one of continued activity within AHI on a number of fronts. One key areas was the completion of the stakeholder consultation on AHI’s strategic plan for 2018-2020 which began earlier in the year. This provided myself and Mike Magan, the AHI Chairman, with the valuable opportunity to meet with senior representatives from a number of organisations. These discussions have fed into the completion of the strategic plan, which is now available on our website click here . During this quarter we have appointed two new members of staff. Firstly, Dr. Maria Guelbenzu has joined us from the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute in Northern Ireland as programme manager for BVD and IBR click here . Maria’s experience in laboratory diagnostics and disease eradication programmes will be an important asset to AHI, ensuring continued progress with both of these programmes. Secondly, progress on IBR will be further enhanced by the appointment of Jonas Brock to a PhD studentship which will focus on modelling of IBR in support of a national eradication programme. This work is in collaboration with the same team that previously developed the national BVD model which has been instrumental in informing decisions in that programme. Our inability to complete the appointment a new Beef HealthCheck programme manager following a recent round of interviews due to the late withdrawal of the successful candidate was disappointing, but the position has been re-advertised and we look forward to making an appointment in the coming months. As reported in detail by the programme managers in the body of the newsletter, progress continues across a number of programmes. A key activity on Johne’s disease has been the presentation of two consultancy reports commissioned by the Implementation Group which will help inform the next phase of the Irish Johne’s Control Programme. The prevalence of calves born persistently infected (PI) with BVD continues to be half that seen in 2017 (0.05% compared to 0.10%). Analysis of somatic cell count data for 2017 shows continued progress toward the programme’s target, with 71% of milk by volume having a SCC below 200,000 cells/mL, while the average national cell count decreased by a further 11,000 cells/mL to 175,000 cells/mL. Our focus on communications to stakeholders and the wider industry continued during this period, with the holding of our Annual General meeting and publication of our Annual Report and a series of bulletins and information leaflets. Training and awareness events for farmers and/or and vets on IBR, Johne’s disease and somatic cell count were also held. Further details on these, and all our activities, are provided in this newsletter. Finally, the role of the Technical Working Groups is essential in developing AHI programmes, and in this edition, we take the opportunity to profile two recently-appointed members of the JD TWG.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Events and Media

Gráinne Dwyer, Communications and Event Manager

CELLCHECK MILKING FOR QUALITY AWARDS LAUNCH I n April we launched the CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards on the farm of two-time winner, Martin Davin, Rathdowney, Co. Laois. This year, in addition to the Best 500 Awards, we have introduced two new categories for Dairy Discussion Groups – Most Improved Group and Best SCC Group. The purpose of the new categories is to encourage a group approach to achieving or maintaining a low SCC in addition to recognising the achievements of individual herd owners . It is our intention to run these Discussion Group Awards as part of the CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards for the next three years. Since the inception of the Awards in 2014, FBD Insurance have sponsored the ‘Best 500’ Award and this year they have agreed to continue their sponsorship for a further three years. Their sponsorshipwill include the two newDairy DiscussionGroup categories.

Attending the launch of the CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards were Tom O'Dwyer Teagasc, Carolyn O'Hara FBD (Sponsor), Gerry Boyle Teagasc, Martin Davin, Dairy Farmer and two time winner of a CellCheck Milking For Quality Award, David Graham AHI, John Cahalan FBD (Sponsor) and Finola McCoy AHI.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Events and Media

AHI AGM The Annual General Meeting of Animal Health Ireland was held on the 15th of May in the Killeshin Hotel, Portlaoise. Including the usual order of business at an AGM, David Graham presented updates on each of our programmes in addition to AHI Business plans. Click here to view AHI's Annual Report.

Representatives of our Stakeholders and Board attending the AHI AGM in Portlaoise.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Events and Media

SMARTER MILKING EVENTS AHI, FRS Training and Teagasc have teamed up with four Dairy Coops - Glanbia, Kerry Agribusiness, Aurivo and Lakeland Dairies, to bring dairy farmers practical demonstrations on how to achieve smarter milking and become more efficient and cost effective. The pilot Smarter Milking events were held during June and July in each of the Coop regions. The events cover the areas of improved cow flow, best practice milking technique, milk quality and standard operating procedures for milking/washing routine in the parlour.

Jerry Cronin of Glanbia speaking at the Smarter Milking Event in Waterford.

David Claxton, host farmer discussing their on-farm SOPs.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

BEEF 2018 AHI attended the Beef 2018 Teagasc Open Day in Grange Research Centre. The focus of our presence at the event was on Johne’s disease and beef suckler herds. A paper written by Lorna Citer (Johne’s disease ProgrammeManager) on the topic was submitted prior to the event for inclusion in the Open Day Handbook. Interest in the topic was encouraging as farmers were anxious to find out more information about the disease, including the signs, testing options, herd impact plus disease control. Particular interest was shown in the disease from beef pedigree breeders. Events and Media

Maria Guelbenzu (AHI) talking to a farmer at the Beef 2018 event in Grange.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Events and Media

PUBLICATIONS Inadditiontoourusualmonthlypublications, several InformationLeafletswereproducedbyAHI providing information on the following topics: Managing an Infectious Disease Outbreak; Guildlines for Preventing the Introduction of Johne’s Disease into a Herd; Practical Roundworm and Fluke Diagnosis. AHI TRAINING Training continued under the Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health (TASAH) programme with the introduction of training for IBR. A small IBR pilot programme is currently being undertaken with the 27 BETTER Farm participants together with the IFJ Tullamore and Newford herds. The data collected and information gathered from the pilot programme will inform and assist in the development of a national IBR programme. The training was specially developed to assist the 29 nominated veterinary practitioners with their herd investigations and biosecurity recommendations. In addition to training under the TASAH programme we held two Johne’s disease VRAMP training sessions in Kildalton Agricultural College, Kilkenny and Teagasc Grange Research Centre, Meath.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Focus on Technical Working Group Members

Name: Cosme Sanchez-Miguel Profession: Veterinary Research Officer, DAFM TWG Membership: Johne's Disease

Cosme Sánchez-Miguel qualified as a veterinary surgeon in 1988 from the Universidad Complutense of Madrid.

In 1989, Cosme began working in a three-person mixed animal veterinary practice in Co. Cavan where he worked for eleven years until 2002. During that period, Cosme took a gap year to study a taught Master's in Veterinary Pathology at the Royal Veterinary College in London and obtained a MSc. (Path) degree in 2000. In 2002 Cosme joined the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine and was appointed as Veterinary Research Officer in the Cork Regional Veterinary Laboratory. He has been working in the Cork RVL for almost 16 years providing a diagnostic pathology service (post-mortem and histological examinations) to private veterinary practitioners and also provides advice to PVPs and farmers. In addition, Cosme is involved in disease surveillance and identification, monitoring and reporting of zoonotic, notifiable and exotic diseases. He is also engaged in training staff for foot and mouth disease preparedness, pathology training of veterinary undergraduates during their placements in the RVL and research.

Name: Siobhan Corry Profession: Veterinary Research Officer, Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute (AFBI) TWG Membership: Johne's Disease

Siobhan Corry is originally from a dairy farm in Omagh, Co. Tyrone and graduated from University College Dublin in 2005. She worked for a few years in mixed practice in Ireland and England before joining AFBI in 2013 as a Veterinary Research Officer in the Disease Surveillance and Investigation Branch of the Veterinary Sciences Division. Siobhan is based in Omagh Regional Veterinary Laboratory where her role includes diagnostic post mortems on farm animals (mainly cattle and sheep) and statutory work. She also works on AFBI’s Cattle Health Scheme which is a voluntary scheme to award herd certification of disease status for Johne’s, BVD, Leptospirosis, IBR and Neospora.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update CellCheck

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie

Finola McCoy, Programme Manager

T he industry-agreed programme target is to have more than 75% of national milk volume delivered with a SCC below 200,000 cells/mL by the end of 2020. A key activity during this period has been the analysis of data provided by processors to DAFM in relation to this target. Benchmarking reports for individual processors relating to 2016 have been provided, building on the previously reported results at national level, which found that 67% of milk by volume achieved this target, with an average SCC for the year of 186,000 cells/mL. Analysis of 2017 data was completed during this quarter, showing further improvement in both of these measures, with 71% of milk having a SCC below 200,000 cells/mL and a national average figure of 175,000 cells/mL. Work is almost completed on the processor-level reports for this 2017 data, with these scheduled for delivery shortly. This data will also form the basis of the CellCheck Milking For Quality Best 500 awards which will take place in November of this year. Finally, at this stage almost all processors have provided data for the first four months of 2018, with results due later this quarter. The Milk Recording Strategy Group, which is developing a strategy to encourage a wider uptake of Milk Recording, continued its work during this period, with the final report expected this quarter.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update BVD

AnimalHealthIreland.ie BVDFree

Dr Maria Guelbenzu, Programme Manager

Results By the end of Q2 of 2018 just over 1.92 million calves had been tested, representing approximately 82% of the anticipated calf crop for the year. The prevalence of PI births in 2018 continues to decline, with only 0.05% of calves tested to the end of Q2 being found to be persistently infected (PI) with BVDV (as compared to 0.10% in 2017, Figure 1), with these being located in 0.9% of 83,000 breeding herds (compared to 2.01% in 2017, Figure 2). This represents a decrease in PI prevalence of 50% from that seen in 2017, from 0.10% to 0.05%, and is a reduction of more than twelve-fold when compared to the prevalence at the start of the compulsory phase of the programme in 2013, when 0.66% of the calves born were PI. Updated programme results are available on a weekly basis online click here .

0.66

% PI ANIMALS

0.46

0.33

0.16

Figure 1. Animal- level prevalence of PI calves born during each year of the programme (YTD; year to date)

2017 2018 0.10 0.05

2013

2014

2015

2016

(YTD)

11.3

% PI HERDS

7.6

5.9

3.2

Figure 2. Prevalence of herds with PI calves born during each year of the programme (YTD; year to date)

2.0 0.9

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018 (YTD)

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme update BVD

Enhancements to the programme introduced over the last couple of years have had a significant impact in the prevalence of the disease and the retention of PI calves. At the end of Q2 2018, there were only 113 PIs born during the year still alive. This corresponds to a reduction of 20% when compared to the 141 PIs alive at the same point last year. Only 20 herds were actually retaining PIs detected in 2018 at the end of Q2 (no registered date of death within 5 weeks of the date of initial test), compared to 27 herds at the same point in 2017. While this clearly demonstrates good progress, it is critical that the incidence of retention is reduced to zero. Negative herd status (NHS) The status of almost all animals in the 83,000 breeding herds in Ireland is now known, including a decreasing number of animals born before the start of the compulsory programme in 2013 that have neither been tested nor produced a calf. At the end of Q2 the number of these animals was approximately 9,500. The majority of these animals are in beef herds, and the majority are also male or have not have a calf registered to them. These animals are not required to be tested under the legislation and may currently be sold untested. It is important that these animals are tested in the coming months. In addition, there are some 31,000 animals born since January 2013 that do not have a valid test result and are therefore not compliant with the requirements of the legislation. The majority of these have never been tested, while a small number have had an initial empty result and not been retested. Around three quarters of these animals are 2018-born, with smaller numbers from preceding years. DAFMwill be writing to these non-compliant herds over the coming weeks, while AHI will contact herds containing only pre-2013-born animals by SMS to encourage their testing. Reflecting the reduction in both PI births and the number of animals with an unknown status, the number of herds acquiring negative herd status (NHS) has increased. Herds qualify for negative herd status (NHS) by meeting the following requirements: 1. existence of a negative BVD status for every animal currently in the herd (on the basis of either ‘direct’ or ‘indirect’ results); 2. absence of any animal(s) deemed to be persistently infected with BVD virus from the herd in the 12 months preceding the acquisition of NHS By the end of Q2 2018, over 85% of herds had acquired NHS, with a further 11,000 only being ineligible due to the presence of a small number of untested animals. While an important programme milestone for any herd, NHS also brings with it an economic benefit, with the number of laboratories that use the RTPCR test method offering testing at reduced costs to herds with NHS click here .

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update BVD

Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health (TASAH) During 2018 all herds with positive results are required to undergo an RDP-funded TASAH herd investigation by a trained veterinary practitioner within 3 months of the initial positive result. These investigations seek to review herd biosecurity, identify a plausible source or sources of infection, ensure that the herd is left free from BVDV and agree farm-specific measures to prevent its re-introduction. Investigations have now been completed for 337 herds with positive results in 2018 (54% of positive herds). A small number have not been completed within the 3 months allocated and these are now being contacted to progress the investigations. BVD Technical Working Group The TWG is currently deliberating on a range of enhancement measures for the 2019 programme for the BVD Implementation Group to consider. The group is also undertaking a range of studies to support surveillance strategies such as antibody testing of bulk tank milk samples, testing of post-abortion bloods and the sampling of under 30 month-old animals at the abattoir. A study to identify factors associated with the re-introduction of infection into herds that had acquired negative herd status is also under way. Animal Health Ireland also continued its participation in STOC-Free (Surveillance Tool for Outcome-based Comparison of FREEdom from infection; www.stocfree.eu), a multi-country project funded by the European Food Safety Authority.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update Johne’s Disease

Johne's Control AnimalHealthIreland.ie

Lorna Citer, Programme Manager

T here have been further registrations in an extended Phase One of the IJCP following the decision by DAFM and participating milk processors to provide additional funding to support whole herd testing and VRAMPs. Due to farmer interest, an invitation to register in the IJCP was extended to an additional 400 herdowners who had already lodged an EOI or late request to register following the Farmer Awareness Seminars which were held late in 2017. The development of an automated online registration form has provided an additional registration pathway for those herdowners who have been invited to join the programme, making the registration process easier and quicker. By the end of Q2 834 herds have registered, of which 364 have commenced, and in some instances completed, their whole herd testing. 164 herds have completed a VRAMP since registering with the programme. A series of communications with both herd owners and vets have been implemented or are planned to ensure that programme requirements are complied with. Another significant activity completed this quarter has been the presentation of two comprehensive reports prepared by international consultants who were asked to consider two key questions relating to Phase Two of the IJCP: • Whether further refinements to the current protocol for testing of herds with negative results could be developed that offered reduced costs to herdowners without impacting the degree of confidence that a herd is free from infection that the current protocol delivers. • Which was the most cost effective herd screening approach that could be applied nationally. On behalf of the consulting team, Dr Evan Sergeant attended a number of briefing sessions and presented the reports to both the JD TWG and JD Implementation Group. During his presentations Dr Sergeant identified a number of elements that should be included in the future Irish approach to Johne’s control, if it is to meet the agreed programme objectives, including: • A voluntary test-based approach to herd assurance. • Ongoing regular VRAMPs. • An option for farmers to declare their herds Assurance Score. • National surveillance for herd-level case-detection. The JD TWG and JD IG are currently considering these reports and the recommendations that have been made, ahead of an anticipated starting date for Phase Two of the IJCP, in January 2019.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update Johne’s Disease

The JD TWG is also continuing to develop a Veterinary Risk Assessment and Management Plan (VRAMP) protocol for beef herds. As part of this process AHI has had an initial meeting with the Pedigree Cattle Breeders' Council of Ireland to determine their interest in, and requirements for, a voluntary control programme for pedigree herds. Ancillary testing and whole herd testing have continued during this quarter with 135 samples submitted for ancillary testing from 39 herds in the period 1 April to 30 June, of which 11 samples from 9 herds were confirmed infected by PCR. The number of samples submitted per herd varied from 1 to >10 with the most frequent number of samples submitted per herd being one. (Fig 3)

10 12 14 16 18

0 2 4 6 8

Figure 3. Frequency of samples submitted for ancillary testing April- June 2018

1 2 3 4 5 5

7 8 9 >10

Number of Samples per herd

Programme support activities this quarter have been focussed on the development of a Checklist to assist herdowners carry out all the activities necessary to meet the requirements of Phase One of the IJCP. A second document, 'Guidelines for Preventing the Introduction of Johne’s Disease into a Herd' is also available through the Johne’s disease information page click here . The main risks to herd biosecurity are identified and this document should be of particular interest to herdowners who wish to actively prevent Johne’s disease entering their herds. The JD Bulletin continues to be published monthly and provides information on current issues, which have been raised by herdowners and stakeholders. Recent topics have includedMAP in the environment as well as a summary of actions to assist farmers carry out a VRAMP. All recent and past JD Bulletins may be accessed on the Animal Health Ireland website click here .

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update Beef Healthcheck

Beef HealthCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie

Dr David Graham, CEO

B y the first of August, data from almost 413,000 cattle had been reported to the ICBF database, of which the majority (38%) were steers, followed by heifers (30%), cows (18%), young bulls (13%) and bulls (1%). Analysis of data from these animals for liver fluke found that overall 15.1% had evidence of liver damage caused by fluke, with live fluke present in a further 3.3%, albeit with marked variation between different categories (Figure 4). Consistent with previous reports, there was also marked variation between counties, with fluke typically being commonly detected in western and northern counties (Figure 5,6).

35.00%

30.00%

25.00%

20.00%

Fluke damage (%) Live fluke (%) Live fluke

15.00%

10.00%

5.00%

0.00%

COW BULL YBULL HEIFER STEER ALL

Figure 4. Prevalence of fluke damage and live fluke in different categories of cattle and overall in 2018 to date.

60.00%

50.00%

Fluke damage Live fluke

40.00%

30.00%

20.00%

10.00%

0.00%

Figure 5. Prevalence of fluke damage and live fluke in cattle by county in 2018 to date.

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AHI STAKEHOLDER NEWSLETTER | SUMMER EDITION

Programme Update Beef Healthcheck

Figure 6. Prevalence of fluke (damage and live fluke combined) in cattle by county in 2018 to date.

The summer edition of the Beef HealthCheck newsletter was published in June click here , with guest contributions from Gary Fisher (Teagasc) on the importance of a 365 day calving interval for suckler herds and Dr. Orla Keane (Teagasc) on anthelmintic resistance in dairy calf to beef farms. A new information leaflet developed by the Parasite Technical Working Group on Practical Roundworm and Fluke Diagnosis was published in June click here , and work is ongoing on a leaflet on anthelmintic resistance. The TWG has also developed a veterinary survey on parasite control in cattle that will be delivered in the coming months.

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Programme Update: IBR

AnimalHealthIreland.ie IBRFree

Dr Maria Guelbenzu, Programme Manager

IBR Pilot A pilot IBR eradication programme has been developed for herds participating in Phase Three of the Teagasc/Irish Farmers journal BETTER Farm Beef Programme. A total of 29 herds will be included. The pilot will comprise the application of an IBR on-farmveterinary risk assessment andmanagement plan (VIBRAMP) and the sampling of the herd. The VIBRAMP consists of a questionnaire that will capture details of the farm structure, animal movements, biosecurity and vaccination history, with the vet and herd owner agreeing up to three changes to improve biosecurity. A final round of training of veterinary practitioners on the disease, the application of the biosecurity questionnaire and the interpretation of the test results was carried out in Portlaoise in June. Herds will be tested by applying a herd ‘snap shot’ which requires the sampling of 30 randomly selected animals over 9 months-old that are used or intended for breeding, followed by testing with an IBR gE (marker) ELISA. As described in the IBR Study Visit Report click here , the ‘snap shot’ herd screen was used in Wallonia, southern Belgium, as a cost effective means to obtain an initial indication of the level of infection in a given herd. This allowed many herds of previously unknown status to progress rapidly to a free status within the programme. Results from this testing will be used to evaluate the herd status, to identify risk factors associated with the presence of infection, to identify common biosecurity risks and inform the decision on further testing and vaccination. For example, testing of all animals in low prevalence herds would be justified, allowing them to move rapidly to freedom. The information generated will also be used by the IBR TWG to inform options for an IBR eradication programme for Ireland. IBR Technical Working Group The Technical working group met twice this quarter, in April and June. Options for a national IBR control programme continue to be developed. As previously reported, a PhD student has been recruited and has now started working on the development of statistical models for IBR in Ireland that will allowdifferent test scenarios and possible eradication strategies to be evaluated. The information generated through the BETTER Farm Beef IBR Pilot described above and other studies will contribute to this work.

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