Dickerson Oxton - September 2019

816-268-1960 | 913-428-8220 www.dickersonoxton.com

SEPT 2019

ANIMAL BITES

CAR ACCIDENTS

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE

More Than a Game FOOTBALL AND THE LAW

BICYCLE/ MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENTS

With fall just around the corner, part of me wants to enjoy the last of the summer weather, but the rest of me can’t wait for football season to kick off. Having been born and raised a Chiefs fan, I can hardly remember a more exciting time to call Arrowhead Stadium home. Our team is looking stronger than ever, especially with Patrick Mahomes calling the shots. I’ll admit it — the Chiefs don’t have a legacy of great quarterbacks. We’ve attracted the occasional star, like Len Dawson or Joe Montana, but these men had already made a name for themselves elsewhere. For decades we’ve tried to get by with journeyman quarterbacks who never really adapted to the demands of today’s more mobile game. Now Mahomes has already proven himself to be a game changer right at the start of his career. My guess is he’ll go down in history as our first real franchise quarterback. Longtime readers of this newsletter might be surprised I follow football so closely. As I’ve mentioned in the past, soccer was my sport growing up — long before I even considered being a lawyer, I dreamed of being a star player. But, even though I still love the sport I grew up playing, even I have to admit that football makes way better television.

The unique pacing of football lets you talk and socialize while watching the game before getting sucked back into the drama. Each time those teams meet at the line of scrimmage, there’s the potential for something explosive to happen. Any time the ball is snapped, there could be an amazing touchdown run, a heartbreaking interception, or a tackle so big you hear it over the crowd. But, more important than this suspense, the pacing of football makes it a deeply tactical game. granularity of strategies and tactics easy to see. Formations, play calls, audibles — you can piece together what each team’s thought process is, and track how they try to counter one another. It’s this aspect of the game that really speaks to Chelsea and me as lawyers. Let me explain. All sports are mental in some capacity, but football makes the Like any good quarterback, an attorney needs to plan and execute a viable strategy. In the case of law suits, this means identifying what documents, evidence, and witnesses we need to support a claim and counter the assertions of the opposition. It’s a lot like a quarterback going over tapes of their opponent’s defensive line — we have to know the best routes to score.

BRAIN & SPINAL CORD INJURIES

Of course, there’s planning, and then there’s execution. Come game day (or trial), all that strategizing won’t mean anything if you aren’t able to think on your feet. Chances are the other side’s done their research, too — if you fail to adapt, you’re going to get sacked. Great attorneys are able to call audibles and adjust their strategies as cases advance. This ability to fight for every point is what separates trial lawyers from those who are happy to take the first settlement offered to them. Of course, this isn’t a perfect comparison. As anxious as we may feel when our team’s quarterback has to make a split second decision, lives aren’t on the line. When a lawyer enters a courtroom, they aren’t fighting for fame; they’re standing up for people and families in desperate situations, often against powerful insurance companies. Unlike Mahomes, we have a moral imperative to give every game our best shot. Of course, as a fan, I hope he does anyway.

BURN INJURIES

CONSTRUCTION INJURIES

NURSING HOME ABUSE

SLIP & FALL ACCIDENTS

BOATING ACCIDENTS

Go Chiefs,

TRUCK ACCIDENTS

–Tom Dickerson

PHARMACEUTICAL & DRUG INJURIES

1

www.dickersonoxton.com

Made with FlippingBook HTML5