CellCheck_Newsletter_September 2016 FINAL

CELLCHECK NEWS P2 CELLCHECK NEWS

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P4 GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH P7 CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH

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NEWSLETTER CellCheck AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of FBD, Teagasc, UCD and our other stakeholders to the CellCheck prog amme. SEPTEMBER EDITION 2016 CellCheck Newsletter JANUARY EDITION 2015 SERVICE PROVIDER NOTES PAGE 8 AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of FBD, Teagasc, UCD and our other stakeholders to the CellCheck programme.

Animal Health Ireland, Main Street, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co Leitrim. Tel: +353 (0) 71 9671928, Email: admin@animalhealthireland.ie www.animalhealthireland.ie 4-5 The Archw ys, Carrick-o -Shannon, Co Leitrim N41 WN27.

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER SEPTEMBER EDITION 2016

NEWS

FINOLA McCOY, PROGRAMME MANAGER

CellCheck milk purchaser survey

IMPROVING udder health is all about achieving a change in behaviour. Change in behaviour at farm level is key, but so too are changes in the service provision and milk purchasing sectors. As part of the CellCheck programme evaluation, we asked all of our stakeholder processors to complete a survey, that collected information on the practices and behaviours that related to milk quality and udder health. This looked at areas such as milk payment policies, the frequency of bulk tank collection and SCC testing, communications to suppliers and educational events or information for suppliers. The survey first looked at these practices in detail in 2011, establishing this as a baseline. The survey was then repeated in 2015, to capture any changes in the same practices and behaviours that had happened since the commencement of the CellCheck programme. For the 6 processors that completed the survey, many of the practices and behaviours had remained constant. There was no reported change in the frequency of bulk tank collection, SCC testing, and testing for antibiotic residue. The frequency and method of communicating the SCC results back to suppliers remained constant, as did the provision of newsletters and farm walks as a means of engaging with and providing information to suppliers. One key change for all respondents was the inclusion of CellCheck information material in their supplier newsletters. There was no reported change in the way in which milk quality advisors responded to and supported herds experiencing mastitis control challenges.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER SEPTEMBER EDITION 2016

The area of most dramatic change seen since the baseline was established, was in the area of SCC- related milk payment policies. Over the course of the 4 years, there was a clear move towards developing a differential milk price structure, acknowledging the SCC levels of the milk purchased. In 2011, only 1 of the 6 processors surveyed paid a base price for milk at a lower SCC level than the EU regulatory level of 400,000 cells/mL. In 2015, this has increased to 4 of the 6 processors. In addition to this, in 2015, 3 of the 6 processors surveyed were also paying a bonus for milk with an SCC <200,000 cells/mL, compared to only 1 processor in 2011. While research clearly shows that the greatest financial gain for farmers from improving udder health is inside the farm gate, from the increased production and sale of milk, the power of ‘external’ levers such as financial incentives should not be underestimated. This evolving approach to milk pricing and behaviour change at processor level can in turn achieve behaviour change at farm level.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER SEPTEMBER EDITION 2016

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Dr. John Upton, Livestock Systems Research Department, Animal and Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Teagasc Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork

Moorepark Milking Research Update

EFFECTIVE milking management relies on the cow, milker and milking machine operating in harmony. Teagasc are currently implementing a milking management survey that will assess the interactions of these three factors on Irish dairy farms. This survey will be carried out on 20 farms over the next 12 months. Teat dimensions are being recorded prior to milking unit attachment. Mouthpiece chamber vacuum and teat end vacuum will be measured during milking non–invasively using the Bio- Control VaDia. The VaDia is a battery operated data logger, and is small and light enough to be taped to a teatcup during milking (Figure 1). Post milking teat condition will be assessed by a number of

Figure 1. VaDia device fitted to the rear left (RL) teatcup of the cluster. Recording points for short milk tube (SMT) vacuum and mouthpiece chamber (MPC) vacuum can be clearly

PULSATION

MPC

SMP

RL TEATCUP

VaDia VACUUM RECORDER

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER SEPTEMBER EDITION 2016

visual observations. Short-term machine-induced changes such as discolouration (an indication of teat barrel swelling), ringing at the base of the teat (an indication of teat barrel swelling and high mouthpiece vacuum) and teat-end swelling (an indication of inadequate liner compression) will be assessed as part of this study. Teat-end condition scores will also be collected. VaDia logs the vacuum data at four points during milking. The data can be downloaded and analysed to identify any vacuum irregularities, and thus identifywhere themilking equipment andmilking routine are underperforming. The over-milking period is identifiable by the point where the mouthpiece chamber (MPC) vacuum increases sharply toward the end of milking (Figure 2). Analysis of on-farm data shows that herds without cluster removers are prone to over milking towards the end of lactation. During the over milking period, short milk tube vacuum can approach system vacuum causing congestion (or swelling) of the teat tissue and hence delayed closure of the teat canal after milking.

Figure 2: Transition from main milking period to over-milking period. Short milk tube (SMT) vacuum in blue and mouthpiece chamber (MPC) vacuum in red. Pulsation chamber vacuum is shown in green. The liner is open when the pulsation chamber vacuum is high.

Classification of cow teat condition can be used to assess the effects of milking management, milking equipment or environmental factors on teat tissue and the risk of new intramammary infections. Short term changes in teat condition in response to a single milking can be used to diagnose faults in milking machines or milking management. These short term changes include firmness of the teat-end after milking and swelling at or near the base of the teat. These short term changes can be assessed after milking. Factors commonly associated with teat-barrel swelling include over milking and teacup crawling. Factors commonly associated with swelling near the teat-end include over milking, high vacuum, pulsation failure or insufficient rest phase of pulsation.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER SEPTEMBER EDITION 2016

Longer termchanges in teat-end condition can bemonitored by assessing the degree of hyperkeratosis (or roughness of the teat-ends) in the herd. Apart from seasonal weather conditions, major factors affecting teat-end hyperkeratosis include teat-end shape, production level, stage of lactation and interactions between milking management and machine factors (i.e. slow milking and over-milking). Teat-end hyperkeratosis may be exacerbated by disinfectants that cause chemical irritation to teat skin or may be improved by the use of a disinfectant with a high concentration of an emollient. Combining milking time tests with teat condition assessment provides a powerful suite of information for assessing milking machine, milker and cow interactive effects. Teat swelling or damage, which becomes evident during these observations, can often be explained by vacuum data obtained through application of the VaDia device.

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CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER SEPTEMBER EDITION 2016

Better late than never!

YOU may not have done a milk recording yet this year in an effort to reduce costs. However, the longer you continue to manage your herd without any individual cow information, the more profit you are likely to be losing. Milk recording is the best tool you have to establish which cows are the most productive in terms of fat, protein and milk yields, and ‘paying their way’. It also allows you to identify cows with elevated SCC-these may have no visible signs of infection, but they will spread infection within your herd and raise your bulk tank SCC. Cows with a high SCC are losing you money. Can you afford to keep carrying all of these ‘passengers’? Regular milk recording will give much better information than ad hoc individual cow testing. Don’t leave it until next year to start milk recording again-remember it is better late than never! If you start milk recording now it will allow you to: 1. Identify cows with high SCC: a. consider drying these cows off early. It will reduce their impact on your bulk tank SCC, reduce the risk of spread to other cows and with targeted dry cow treatment (DCT) they will have the best chance of curing. b. segregate high SCC cows, and milk them last if you are not going to dry them off yet. If it is not possible to run them as a separate herd, hold them back and milk them last. This will prevent them infecting other cows. 2. Develop a culling list of cows that have had recurring high SCC and mastitis problems and are unlikely to cure – consider culling cows that have had high SCC for two consecutive lactations. 3. Consider selective DCT this year i.e. selecting which cows to treat with dry cow antibiotic based on their infection status. You can only make informed decisions with milk recording information. Discuss this with your vet.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER SEPTEMBER EDITION 2016

For milk recording services contact:

Further information on milk recording is available in Guideline 23 of the CellCheck Farm Guidelines for Mastitis Control.

Munster Cattle Breeding Group

(023) 43228 (01) 4502142 (062) 33111

Progressive Genetics

Tipperary Co-op

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER SEPTEMBER EDITION 2016

A Resource and Point of Contact for CellCheck Activities in your Area CellCheck Regional Coordinators

Paul Cullinan 087 2470803 Mayo/Sligo Aurivo

Brendan Dillon 087 2626851 Cork/Waterford/ Wexford/Wicklow Glanbia

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Tom Starr 087 6697010 Tipperary/Limerick Arrabawn Co-op

Joe Moriarty 066 7163200 Kerry/Clare Kerry Agribusiness

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John Fitzpatrick 086 0426567 Kilkenny/Laois/Carlow/ Kildare/Dublin Glanbia

Sinead Treanor 023 8822369 West Cork Carbery Group

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Tom Downes 087 2564669 Longford/Monaghan Lakeland Dairies

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Andrew O’Neill 086 1836505 Tipperary Tipperary Co-Op

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