Sugar Land - Missouri City Edition | March 2020

SUGAR LAND MISSOURI CITY EDITION

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 7  MARCH 3APRIL 5, 2020

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IMPACTS

TODO LIST

LOCAL CAMPS

DINING FEATURE

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CALLING FOr HELP

Although being a reghter is already a risky job, cancer is a long-term danger that can remain dormant for years and is becoming more top-of-mind for these rst responders, who are signicantly more likely than the average person to be diagnosed with various forms of cancer in their lifetimes. Overall, reghters are 9% more likely to develop cancer and 14%more likely to die from cancer than the general population. However, reghters are at a 114% to 202%greater risk of developing certain cancers, such as mesothelioma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, malig- nant melanoma and leukemia as these are classied as common occupational illnesses, said Doug Boeker, Sugar Land Fire-EMS chief. “We have a number of retirees that have had cancer, and we’ve had a number of current employees that have had some sort of cancer,” Boeker said. “The num- ber of skin cancers on chests, necks and faces … is very similar to the absorption areas that studies show are highest.” Both Sugar Land and Missouri City re departments CONTINUED ON 24 Local reagenciescombat cancers in reghters BY BETH MARSHALL

The National Human Tracking Hotline is a resource for victims of tracking and those with tips about potential tracking cases. The number of contacts the hotline receives in a year has increased from 2014-2018.

50K

NATIONWIDE NUMBERS

41,088

40K

33,894

Contacts

Cases

32,152

27,290

Contacts : times the hotline was reached via phone call, text, webchat, web form or email Cases : distinct instances of tracking reported to the hotline

26,248

30K

20K

10,949

8,773

7,748

5,714

5,151

10K

SOURCE: NATIONAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING HOTLINE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

0 2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Awareness of human tracking on the rise

When compared to the general population reghters are: & 9 % more likely to develop cancer.

14 % more likely to die from cancer.

Barriers block knowing scope of the issue in Fort Bend County

quantifying the scope of tracking as well as ques- tions about eective ways to combat tracking. Human tracking, and specically sex tracking, will happen as long as there is demand, said Bob San- born, CEO and president of Children at Risk, a Hous- ton-based research and advocacy organization. “What we’ve discovered is that across the state of Texas, most of the tracking operations are happen- ing in areas where there’s lots of money,” Sanborn said. “A lot of times, people think [tracking] hap- pens on the wrong side of town, but indeed, it’s hap- pening in Fort Bend County. And, it’s all generated by demand.” CONTINUED ON 22

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

As local community organizations advocate against human tracking and the Fort Bend County District Attorney’s Oce prosecutes more track- ing-related cases, parents, ocials and community members are becoming increasingly aware of the threat of human tracking in Fort Bend County. But as what is traditionally seen as a hidden crime comes to light, so do problems with accurately

Clay Fenwick was the rst Sugar Land Fire Department reghter to die in the line of duty in September 2019. He was 57 years old and had prostate cancer for two years.

SOURCES: SUGAR LAND FIRE DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

communityimpact.com

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