STGP January 2019

JOSEPH F. EMMERTH A LOOK AT FAMILY LAW SULLIVAN, TAYLOR, GUMINA & PALMER, P.C.

JAN 2019

630-665-7676

www.stglawfirm.com

SETTING NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS

Avoiding Future Distress

Many individuals don’t even think about setting New Year’s resolutions, but they should. Common resolutions involve self-care — eating better, exercising more, or losing weight — but these are usually dropped first. As I stated in last month’s edition, it’s essential to maintain self-care, especially for those who have recently experienced emotional strain. However, I want to stress that there are other resolutions equally important for yourself and your children. There may be a lot of changes coming your way in 2019, and it’s important to set resolutions that will help combat any changes that might shake up your children’s schedules, your parenting times, or your finances. One of the most significant changes many parents will face this year is their children graduating from high school. Even if your child isn’t graduating yet, I encourage you to start planning for when they

For parents who are divorcing this year, we’re one of the few states that compel divorced parents to contribute to their child’s college fund. When parents divorce, there is paperwork regarding what they each have to contribute or a document stating a specific time they must decide by. If the parents haven’t come to an agreement, they will need to file a motion with the court. If you know this will be an issue, get the motion on file so you’ll know by April or May. When your child figures out where they want to pursue their education and how much it will cost, the court will allocate who will pay for what if you and your ex can’t reach an agreement. Parents who are divorcing and have a child getting ready to enter college need to plan for the financial burden it may cause. Most of my clients would be well-served to communicate better with their ex — although they might not want to hear it. There are a lot of problems in my cases that could easily be resolved between parties

enroll in college in the future. Start saving for your child’s college tuition, or begin planning how much it will cost and who is going to pay for what.

if they communicated better or confronted the issue in the moment instead of waiting until the last minute. Proper communication will change how you approach disagreements and serve as a good example for your children. Being honest with your ex can also be a beneficial resolution, especially when it comes to scheduling visitation times. Arguments tend to break out when one parent has more time with their children than the other, and speaking honestly about how you feel can help the two of you reach an agreement.

HOWEVER, I WANT TO STRESS THAT THERE ARE OTHER RESOLUTIONS EQUALLY IMPORTANT FOR YOURSELF AND YOUR CHILDREN.

Setting and keeping your goals this year might be difficult, but the effort spent will be tremendously rewarding. –Joseph Emmerth

1

630-665-7676

Made with FlippingBook Online newsletter