Memory Care America - February 2020

Memory Care Moments

FEBRUARY 2020

1.833.MEM.CARE • 833.636.2273

www.MemoryCareAmerica.com

CHEF RICHARD REFLECTS ON HIS CULINARY CAREER Good Food and Great Rewards

Our Communities Memory Care of Naples 2626 Goodlette Frank Road Naples, FL 34103 239.403.0826 memorycarenaples.com Memory Care of Little Rock 2501 Aldersgate Road Little Rock, AR 72205 501.260.7407 memorycarelittlerock.com Memory Care of Westover Hills 10910 Town Center Drive San Antonio, TX 78251 210.802.6653 memorycarewestoverhills.com Memory Care of Simpsonville 645 Scuffletown Rd. Simpsonville, SC 29681 864.962.3038 memorycaresimpsonville.com Memory Care of New Braunfels 2022 State HWY 46 W New Braunfels, TX 78132 830.420.5882 memorycarenewbraunfels.com

M y career as a chef began all the way back in high school when I got a job washing dishes at a cute restaurant that had been converted from an old barn. The cooking staff took me under their wings and taught

to the menu. That’s just the nature of the food industry. A dish could be considered a culinary masterpiece by one person and a disgusting pile by another. We all have our own tastes! But in the Memory Care world, we also have to consider function. We have to create a variety of meals, including regular-style, easy-to-eat, and puréed dishes. We’re serving a population that grew up and thrived on meat and potatoes, and we owe it to them to serve meals they love and are comfortable with.

me the basics of cooking. That’s when I learned creating meals was just in my blood.

From there, I didn’t take any shortcuts to get to

where I am today. I went to school for formal training, and I worked my way up to running my own kitchen and even my own business for a period of time. When Linda Carrasco got in touch about a

Chef Richard with Westover Hills Executive Director, Tawana McDaniel

At the same time, I also want to create a menu that excites people. Food shouldn’t be

boring. It should evoke emotions and memories and comfort us as it nourishes us. When a family told me

possible job opportunity more than three years ago, I was ready to seize it. Linda and I had worked together in the past, but at the time of her call, I was managing my own business. It was fun, but it was exhausting work too, and I wanted to pursue something different. I joined the team at Memory Care of Westover Hills just over three years ago, and it’s become more rewarding each day. It was a lot of work to get our kitchen to where it is today, but I’m proud of the staff we have and the work they do. Our biggest priority is offering comfort and nutrition to those facing one of the toughest diagnoses you can be given, and when we make that happen, we’ve done our job. That’s what we all strive for in the kitchen — an opportunity to do something we’re proud of. Now, I’m not going to lie to you; cooking in this environment comes with its challenges. Just the other day, a family approached me and mentioned that their father doesn’t enjoy a particular style of food, and, I kid you not, a few hours later, another family asked me to add more of that style of food

their loved one wanted more pizza, I found spots on the menu to add it! This is their home, and they deserve the meals that make it feel like home. Regardless of how puzzling the menu can be or of the dietary restrictions of those we serve, this job is far and away about being a positive presence in someone’s day. One of the greatest compliments I received recently was when a woman at Memory Care of Westover Hills told me I was a nice guy. Compliments like that touch me and show that through something as simple as food, we get to

make a difference in their lives too. –Chef Richard Morgan

P.S. I love cooking, but I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the greatest job I’ve ever had: being a dad to seven kids and a grandpa to five grandkids. It’s a job that I will have the privilege of having for more than 40 years by the time my youngest graduates high school. They make me proud every day.

1.833.MEM.CARE • 833.636.2273

1

Do Not Keep Our Work a Secret!

After a Beautiful Life, the Lewey’s Love Story Continues at Memory Care America 7 Decades of Love

A WORLD OF YOGURT A Look at 3 Types of Yogurt

T his past Christmas was the first holiday that Bill and Mildred “Midge” Lewey spent apart in over 70 years. “Our courtship wasn’t much. It was just one of those things where we decided we were in love, and we got married,” Bill says. “The good Lord has been good to us.” The couple met in high school before Midge’s family moved to Kansas City, Missouri. Bill and Midge would frequently write to one another, and they kept in touch while Bill entered the military and Midge finished her senior year of high school. Around Christmas 1948, Bill decided Midge was the woman he wanted to marry, and despite the fact that she was seeing another classmate of theirs, he asked to see her. He didn’t waste time asking Midge to be his wife. But she didn’t give him the answer he expected or was looking for.

If you walk down the yogurt aisle of any store today, you’ll see more varieties than ever before: Greek, Australian, Icelandic, whipped, and probiotic-packed — not to mention yogurts made with soy, coconut, and almond milks. And, of course, you have all the classic yogurt brands and tons of flavors to choose from. But what’s the difference between all of these yogurt varieties? What sets Greek apart from Australian? What is unique about Icelandic (Skyr)? We’ve gone ahead and broken it down for you. Greek yogurt is one of the more common varieties on the market. It’s typically a thicker consistency with roughly double the protein of traditional, strained yogurts. Most brands of Greek yogurt have less sugar and fewer carbs, as well as fewer ingredients overall. A high-quality Greek yogurt will typically only have 3–4 ingredients: milk, live active cultures, and any flavorings (vanilla, honey, fruit, etc.). If you see any fillers like corn starch or corn syrup listed on the ingredients label, it’s probably not the real deal. Australian yogurt (or Aussie yoghurt) is newer to most stores, and one of the biggest brands in the U.S. is Noosa. Because it’s typically made with whole milk, it’s rich and creamy — you won’t be saving any calories here. It’s not quite as thick as Greek yogurt, but it’s not runny either. It’s often described as silky smooth and sweeter than other varieties of yogurt, thanks in part to the whole milk. Honey and fruit mix in exceptionally well, and like Greek yogurt, this variety is packed with protein. Skyr, often referred to as Icelandic yogurt, has a lot in common with Greek yogurt in terms of consistency and protein content, but it’s actually not a yogurt at all. It’s a cultured dairy product classified as “fresh sour milk cheese.” But don’t let that put you off. It’s thick, smooth, packed with nutrients and probiotics, and lower in sugar than traditional yogurt. Skyr is most commonly made with skim or low-fat milk, but since it has gained global popularity, you can find varieties made with 2% and whole milk, too. Yogurt (dairy and nondairy) is a rich source of gut- healthy probiotics, and while there are some differences in terms of texture, flavor, and nutritional content, any of these three types are a great choice for your diet.

Instead, she just said, “When?”

Six months later, the couple was married, and their life together was full of highs and lows. They moved to Texas, where Bill would train members of the military on Lackland Air Force Base. The couple had two children and have enjoyed their lives together as grandparents. Their love continued to grow as their

number of anniversaries climbed. When a preacher once commended them for their long marriage, Midge simply said, “Well, we didn’t intend to, but he worked so hard that he couldn’t go down and file for divorce!”

But that’s always been Midge — confident and humorous.

Fourteen years ago, Midge’s Alzheimer’s diagnosis tested their marriage. Bill took care of Midge for as long as he could, often keeping tabs on her whereabouts and supporting her through this diagnosis and battling his own health concerns as well. But this past September, Bill knew it was time to get help, and that’s when he decided his wife needed to live at Memory Care of Westover Hills.

“I think it’s a wonderful place,” Bill says. “I wish I was still taking care of her, but I just can’t do it anymore. We think the people are great out there.”

After more than seven decades of supporting one another through better, worse, sickness, and health, it’s no surprise that Midge still recognizes Bill when he comes to visit, even if she doesn’t know his name. Their dedication proves that seven decades of love can withstand nearly anything. If you know of a family who could benefit from our services, don’t keep our work a secret! Referrals are the best compliment you can give us. Direct them to MemoryCareAmerica.com or find us on Facebook.

2

Do Not Keep Our Work a Secret!

www.MemoryCareAmerica.com

Memory Care Fun! Brightening Our Residents’ Days With Parties, Outfits, and Flowers

E ach day that we get to celebrate with our residents is a gift for our teams at Memory Care America! Below are just a few of the ways our communities had a little fun this holiday season. We’re always looking for ways to make our residents’ days brighter, even if that means wearing silly outfits or learning a new skill. Members of the Memory Care of Little Rock team were some of the best dressed during the holidays, donning festive sweaters and delighting residents. Meanwhile, the staff at Memory Care of Naples created beautiful floral arrangements with flowers from local business Oakes Farms Market for our residents. The good times were rolling at all our locations this new year! Memory Care of New Braunfels, Memory Care of Simpsonville, and Memory Care of Westover Hills all celebrated the new year and new decade with fantastic parties. Your support makes our celebrations possible, so don’t keep our work a secret! Referrals are the best compliment you can give us. Direct those who could benefit from our services to MemoryCareAmerica.com or find us on Facebook.

Memory Care of New Braunfels, Memory Care of Simpsonville, and Memory Care of Westover Hills ring in the new year and decade!

Memory Care of Naples staff craft gorgeous floral arrangements for residents.

The Memory Care of Little Rock team celebrates the holidays with festive Christmas sweaters.

Easy Shrimp Scampi

T S Z P F R S R G Z V K I S B U H R U O R P E A N Z H K S I G E O N C N L A J O A I A R U S N O F E B E E M R I N A A I G D N W V G C A D N M U X D Q T O O B A H N O G G Q Y E I N L C O G R L N J V A V N S G G E T A L O C O H C E T O S E S O R B U P I S C E S U N S W V O P O M S T R E P T F O Z G I W B D V H R V N H V E D D J U Z U O E

Inspired by The Blond Cook

Ingredients

• 4 tbsp butter • 4 tbsp olive oil • 1 tbsp minced garlic • 1 lb shrimp, peeled and deveined

• 1/2 tsp oregano • 1/2 cup dry white wine • 1/4 cup lemon juice • 8 oz cooked linguine • 1/4 cup parsley

Directions

1. In a skillet over medium heat, melt 2 tbsp of butter with 2 tbsp of olive oil. Add garlic and cook for 2 minutes. 2. Add shrimp and oregano, stirring frequently until shrimp is pink. Remove shrimp from skillet. 3. Add wine and lemon juice to skillet and bring the mixture to a boil. 4. Stir in remaining butter and olive oil and cook until butter is melted. 5. Add cooked shrimp to skillet and cook for 1 minute, stirring occasionally. 6. In a serving bowl, top cooked linguine with shrimp mixture. Garnish with parsley and serve.

AQUARIUS ASH CHOCOLATE CUPID DONOR

GROUNDHOG LOVE PISCES PRESIDENTS ROMANCE

ROSES SKIING SNOWBANK SUGAR VALENTINE

1.833.MEM.CARE • 833.636.2273

3

Do Not Keep Our Work a Secret!

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

1.833.MEM.CARE www.memorycareamerica.com

2211 NW M ilitary H wy ., S te . 201 S an A ntonio , TX 78213 Inside 1 Chef Richard Creates Comfort Through Food 2 What’s Your Favorite Yogurt? 2 More Than 70 Years of Love at Memory Care America 3 End-of-Year Fun at Memory Care America! 3 Word Search Easy Shrimp Scampi 4 Too Old for Love? No Such Thing!

833.636.2273

Memory Care Wellness

TIME TO GET BACK OUT THERE!

Expert Advice to Beat the Stigma of Senior Dating

creating a list of 26 different places in your area, one for each letter of the alphabet, then going to those places. While you’re out, Copeland says, “You want to smile. Make eye contact. Ask a question. Give a compliment and put a question behind it.”

Getting back into dating can be hard when you’ve been out of the game for a few decades. In fact, some would-be romantics are so self-conscious about their age that they never even try! In honor of Valentine’s Day, we’ve rounded up some expert advice on dating at any age.

Don’t fear online dating.

Be present when meeting new people.

Online dating is a great way to meet people outside of your social circle, and there are many dating sites and apps specifically for singles over 50 who are ready to mingle.

Dating as a senior means coming to the table with a lot of baggage. Dating is when people get acquainted, so be careful about sharing that baggage right out of the gate. This doesn’t mean you should never talk about heavy topics, but remember this advice from the popular dating site, eHarmony: “Early on, focus on enjoying each other’s company here and now.” It doesn’t matter if you’re 26 or 62, dating is always hard. You have to step outside your comfort zone and trudge through a series of terrible first dates. But in the end, it’s all worth it when you find that special someone with whom you can spend your golden years. Just remember, you’ll never meet that person if you don’t make the leap.

Julie Spira, a relationship expert with senior dating app OurTime, says that “Authentic dating profiles get the best results.” Basically, don’t lie on your profile. Use a picture of you from this year and be proud of your age. That’s the best way to find people who will love the real you.

Go to 26 different places.

Prefer to meet people in person? Lisa Copeland, a dating coach who works exclusively with women over 50, recommends

4

Do Not Keep Our Work a Secret!

www.MemoryCareAmerica.com

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4

Made with FlippingBook flipbook maker