Stano Law - January 2019

Many homeowners reach a point in their lives when they’re ready tomove from the house they raised their families in to something smaller andmore manageable. While finding the right place can be a challenge, the hardest part of downsizing is often sorting through a lifetime’s worth of possessions. This process, called contents downsizing, is much easier when you follow this four-step system. STARTWITH THE JUNK Beginning your downsizing with the hardest items will only lead to frustration and inaction. Instead, start by tackling areas of the house that are full of documents, knickknacks, and boxes you haven’t touched in years. These will be the easiest to part with and will put you in the right downsizingmindset. DONATE UNWANTED ITEMS The next category contains items that are no longer valuable to you or your family but may be useful to others. These items can be donated to one of many worthy organizations, such as Goodwill, the Salvation Army, or St. Vincent de Paul. Donations are a way to give back to the less fortunate instead of simply giving or throwing things away. GIVE GIFTS TO LOVED ONES If you have children, they will undoubtedly want to keep a few cherished mementos and precious possessions. Deciding who will keep what can be What to Keep, Gift, Donate, andThrow Out A Guide to Downsizing

a sensitive subject, so you’ll need to devise an equitable way to divvy up the goods. Some families engage in the process collaboratively, but there should always be some communication before anything is thrown out. Your kids may value certain items more than you ever realized. If you suspect a certain heirloom could be a source of contention, it’s best to hold on to it andmake it part of your estate plan. ONLY KEEP THE ESSENTIALS After completing the first three steps, you should be left with only those items you actually use and those that have the most sentimental value to you. These are the objects worth bringing to your new home. BONUS TIP: COLOR CODE EACH CATEGORY Odds are that you’ll find junk and valuables stored right next to each other. If you don’t have time to physically separate them at the moment, use different colored Post-it notes to keep everything organized when it comes time to move.

Take a Break!

PEANUT BUTTER AND BERRY FRENCH TOAST Ingredients

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8 slices brioche, 1/2-inch thick 1/4 cup creamy peanut butter

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2 cups cornflakes

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 large eggs

2 cups mixed berries

1/8 cup heavy cream 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

Powdered sugar, to sprinkle Maple syrup, for serving

Directions

1. On a large baking sheet

4. In a large skillet over medium heat, melt 1 tablespoon butter. Once melted and up to temperature, add sandwiches, cooking on one side until golden and crisp, about 2–3 minutes. 5. Return sandwiches to baking sheet, add remaining butter, and repeat on other side. 6. Top sandwiches with berries, sprinkle with powdered sugar, and serve withmaple syrup.

lined with wax paper, place 4 slices of brioche and spread 1 tablespoon of peanut butter on each. Cover with remaining slices, creating sandwiches. 2. In a pie plate, beat eggs with cream and vanilla. In another, coarsely crush the cornflakes. 3. Lightly soak sandwiches in the eggmixture, then dredge in cornflakes, pressing to adhere. Return to baking sheet.

Recipe courtesy of Delish

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