Atlanta Divorce Law Group - September 2021

THE BEST PLACES TO VISIT IN CROATIA Your Next Affordable Vacation Spot!

SPLIT The second largest city in Croatia (the first being Zagreb) is Split, founded by a Greek colony in the second or third century B.C. Historically, Split enjoyed being an independent city-state many times, and that free spirit is very tangible, as Split is very different from any other city in Croatia. With well-preserved Roman architecture and a multitude of museums, it’s no wonder Split is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Although Croatia was among the first UN countries to open its doors to Americans, always be safe and check the newest regulations before booking your travel. Hopefully you enjoyed learning about this unique, wonderful country!

This gorgeous coastal nation will absolutely blow you away with its beautiful architecture, landscapes, and delicious blend of Mediterranean and Slavic cuisine. Even better, it’s a fairly affordable place to visit! While many travelers land in Zagreb, the beautiful capital city and cultural hub, you wouldn’t want to miss these destinations. DUBROVNIK As the “Pearl of the Adriatic,” this coastal city is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the Adriatic Sea. It’s a beautiful city, featuring 13th century walls, marble stone streets, Gothic palaces, breathtaking churches, and an imposing fortress. There’s so much to do in the town square — one of Croatia’s largest and most beautiful — and you’ll

be able to explore many historic structures nearby. Nature also has plenty to offer, with secluded coves and beaches nearby for exploration. PLITVICE LAKES NATIONAL PARK Near the border with Bosnia-Herzegovina, you’ll find one of Croatia’s oldest and most beautiful national parks and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Although it’s quite the drive, you won’t regret it — the park has an outstanding and picturesque series of tufa lakes and caves, all connected by waterfalls. With over 16 interconnected cascading lakes, it’s unlike anything else you’ll see. If you get hungry, you’ll love the nearby National Restaurant Licka Kuca, which is famous for its traditional Croatian preparation of lamb under a cast-iron bell.

3 Tips for Preserving Family History This Grandparents Day Do You Know Your Parents’ Stories?

In many Native American tribes, it’s traditional to gather and tell stories. These tales of the tribe’s achievements and the wisdom of its elders are handed down from generation to generation. They remind the tribe of who they are, where they came from, and what makes them unique. As the Oklahoma Historical Society describes it, this tradition is “an affirmation of community and individual well-being and identity.” This month for National Grandparents Day (Sept. 12), we have a suggestion for you: Create a tradition of storytelling in your family! You don’t have to do this around a campfire. Your living room will work, too. Just be sure you bring all of your family’s living generations together and encourage the grandparents to share their stories.

Seniors have long memories, and they’re the only ones with the charm and magic to relate family history in a way that will inspire your kids. Many of us assume children aren’t interested in history, but when it’s told with detail and nuance, they’re almost always fascinated! Kids love asking questions and learning new things, and you can help them do it. Here are three tips for preserving your family history. 1. DON’T FORGET TO PRESS RECORD. Trust us — you’ll want to remember these stories! You can record your conversation on your cellphone (which should come preloaded with a voice-recording app), an iPad, or a digital recorder. Just remember to test your device first to make sure it works well. 2. SET ASIDE AT LEAST 40 MINUTES TO TALK. In its guide to oral histories, the Hege Library says the ideal length for an interview is 40 minutes to an hour. Make time for at least that much uninterrupted storytelling. If you’d like to continue, take a break at the hour mark! 3. COME PREPARED WITH QUESTIONS. Storytelling is easier for some people than others. To encourage your parents to talk, work with your kids to create a list of questions like, “What games did you play when you were young?” and “What were mealtimes like in your family?” These will inspire them to reflect. (The Smithsonian Institution Archives has a long list of suggestions at SIArchives.si.edu/History/How-Do-Oral-History.)

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