Gibson Law Group - October 2020

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE

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Meet ‘Trash Heap’ and ‘The Batmobile’

The Weird Things Celebs Tried to Trademark The Best Mental Health Apps

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Spooky Strawberry Ghosts The Night Martians Invaded New Jersey

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False Halloween Myths Perpetuated by the Media

RAZOR BLADES AND POT? HALLOWEEN MYTHS THE MEDIA LOVES TO SCARE US WITH

of a child being poisoned. In 1974, a father hid cyanide in his son’s candy in Texas, leading to the child’s death. It was discovered that the father was attempting to collect life insurance to ease his $100,000 debt. THC THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the primary psychoactive compound found in cannabis, and it’s the chemical that makes people high. In more recent years, there have been an increasing number of stories spread on social media about THC-laced candy or edibles being found in kids’ candy bags. There are also news stories of THC-laced candy being found during warranted searches. However, that’s as far as the story goes, at least when it comes to Halloween. In 2019, police in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, warned parents to be on the lookout for THC-laced candies after they found some

For many people, Halloween is the time of year when certain spooky myths and superstitions come alive. It’s when we hear stories of black cats and bad luck or ghosts in the attic. But there are some recent myths that often get perpetuated by both mainstream and social media — stories that frighten parents and create an anxious, fearful atmosphere. Razor Blades and Poison For a long time, the “razor blades in candy” has been a go-to media story. Every year around Halloween, you’re sure to see your local news running a segment that encourages parents to check their kids’ candy for tampering so their children don’t swallow razor blades or poison. There have been zero substantiated cases of any child or parent finding a razor blade hidden in the chocolate and nougat. There has, however, been one lone case

in a bust. While the warning was certainly valid, nothing ever came of it.

Should you check your child’s candy? Most definitely! It’s always good to check just in case, though the danger is negligible. That said, kids should never take unwrapped or homemade treats while trick-or-treating. This has less to do with hidden razors and more to do with simply not knowing what’s in those items, such as potential allergens.

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