Mattson Financial Services - December 2018

Instagrammodels and fitness specialists flood social media feeds with nutrition tips and tricks, but amid the blur of muscled selfies and misguided dieting advertisements, it’s hard to determine what is actually healthy. Arm yourself with the following knowledge about tricky food ingredients, and always question diet fads blasted on social media. DEVIOUS DRINKS There’s actually no scientific evidence to suggest“performance- enhancing”drinks will make you a better athlete. If you drink sports drinks regularly, you’re actually filling your body with unnecessary sugars and additives. Furthermore, common fruit juices contain a lot of sugar, and skim or fat-free milk contains additives that eliminate the full feeling whole milk provides you. SNEAKY SNACKS Food marketing labels use the latest diet trends to twist consumers into thinking they’re making smart choices simply because something is labeled“organic”or“low-fat.”Next time you’re shopping for a quick snack, be mindful when grabbing trail mix, yogurt, granola, microwave popcorn, or protein bars. These items are often falsely advertised as healthy options, and while they may contain some nutrients, most people don’t adhere to the listed serving size. When you eat more than recommended, you could be offsetting the nutritional benefits. LETTUCE LIARS Yes, even salads can be misleading when it comes to dieting. Salad dressing is a yummy way to make a salad more exciting, but it should be doled out in limited quantities. Unfortunately, most prepackaged salads do not limit dressing portions. A pool of ranch dressing over lettuce will limit the benefits you’ll get from the healthy greens. Additionally, nuts, cheeses, and seeds can be healthy and tasty on your salad, but they should also be eaten in moderation. DINNERTIME DECEPTION Your California roll may be hiding more than you think. Sushi is usually rolled in sugar-loaded and carbohydrate-heavy white rice. Aside from the white rice, the more intricate rolls often include toppings and condiments best savored in moderation. If you think you can avoid fried and greasy options by ordering a veggie burger, think again. These meat alternatives often contain another unhealthy dose of rice and are fried or baked in processed oils. While this information may send you into a panic about finding healthy foods, remember to stick to natural, low-additive foods, monitor your portion sizes, and create homemade alternatives to some of your favorites. You don’t have to compromise on taste to get the most nutrition out of your meals. Try cooking your favorite foods from scratch and avoid the consequences of misleading ingredients. Misleading Ingredients You Should Avoid HEALTHY FOOD FAUX PAS

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MARY’S BUTTERY ROASTED CHESTNUTS

Inspired by Bon Appétit

Ingredients

• • • •

2 pounds fresh chestnuts, unpeeled

Pinch of freshly ground nutmeg

2–3 sprigs rosemary

1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

2 teaspoons kosher salt, or more to taste

Directions

1. Heat oven to 450 F. 2. Place a large sheet of foil on a rimmed baking sheet. 3. On a large, flat workspace, place chestnuts flat side down. Using a sharp knife, carve an X on the rounded side of each chestnut. 4. In a large bowl of hot water, soak chestnuts for 1 minute. 5. Pat dry and transfer to a medium bowl. Add rosemary, butter, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Toss to coat and transfer to baking sheet. Arrange in a single layer. Gather the edges of the foil together, leaving an opening at the top.

6. Roast until peels curl up, about 30–45 minutes. 7. Transfer to a platter and serve while hot or warm.

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