SaskEnergy Second Quarter Report - September 30, 2020

Second Quarter Report September 30, 2020

2020-21 Second Quarter Report

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As a Crown corporation, SaskEnergy is committed to ensuring that all corporate activities align with the Government of Saskatchewan’s Crown Sector Strategic Priorities and the Saskatchewan Plan for Growth. Providing safe, reliable, high quality service to its customers is critically important to the Corporation – as is the provision of infrastructure necessary for the Province to grow and prosper.

Mission Deliver natural gas in a safe, reliable, affordable way.

Vision Create customer value through safe, innovative energy solutions.

Values

Safety We are always committed to our safety, the safety of our team and the public. Accountability We are accountable for our decisions, our actions and the results. Spirit We create a positive and dynamic work environment that recognizes achievement and balance while supporting business success.

Collaboration We succeed through strong internal and external relationships, trust and open communication.

2020-21 Second Quarter Report

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Table of Contents

Financial and Operating Highlights

4

Management’s Discussion and Analysis

5

Introduction

5 6 7

Industry Overview

Consolidated Financial Results Liquidity and Capital Resources

15 16 17

Capital Additions

Outlook

Consolidated Financial Statements

18

Condensed Consolidated Statement of Financial Position Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income Condensed Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

18 19 21 22 23

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Financial and Operation Highlights

Three months ended September 30,

Six months ended September 30,

2020

2019

2020

2019

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS ($ millions)

Total revenue

134

139

301

308

Total expenses

130

156

289

325

Consolidated net income

4

(17)

12

(17)

Market value adjustments

(18)

15

(30)

27

Income before unrealized market value adjustments

(14)

(2)

(18)

10

Dividends

2

-

5

-

Cash provided by operating activities

25

48

81

109

Capital additions

57

101

99

157

Total assets

3,217

3,045

Total net debt

1,564

1,447

Debt ratio

58.7%

56.7%

OPERATING HIGHLIGHTS

Distribution Volumes distributed (petajoules) Residential/Farm

3 2

2 3

9 8

7 8

Commercial

Industrial

39 44

33 38

73 90

73 88

Total

Weather (compared to last 30 years)

12% warmer

12% colder

10% colder

5% colder

Transmission Volumes transported (petajoules) Domestic

71

75 20 95

143

149

Export

3

4

34

Total

74

147

183

Income before MVA $ Millions

Cash from operations $ Millions

Capital additions $ Millions

10 20

10

150

7

100 150 200

157

109

91

119

80

100

99

(20) (10) 0

50

0 50

(18)

0

2020

2019

2018

2020

2019

2018

2020

2019

2018

Management’s Discussion and Analysis

INTRODUCTION

The Management’s Discussion and Analysis (MD&A) highlights the primary factors that affected SaskEnergy’s consolidated financial condition and performance for the six months ended September 30, 2020. Using financial and operating results as its basis, the MD&A describes the Corporation’s past performance and future prospects, enabling readers to view SaskEnergy from the perspective of management. The MD&A is presented as at November 18, 2020, and should be read in conjunction with the Corporation’s condensed consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standard (IAS) 34 Interim Financial Reporting using accounting policies consistent with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). For additional information related to the Corporation, refer to SaskEnergy’s 2019-20 Annual Report. The MD&A contains certain forward-looking statements that are subject to inherent uncertainties and risks. Many of these risks are described in the Risk Management and Disclosure section of SaskEnergy’s 2019-20 Annual Report. All forward-looking statements reflect the Corporation’s best estimates and assumptions based on information available at the time the statements were made. However, actual results and events may vary significantly from those included in, contemplated by, or implied by such statements. The volume of natural gas delivered to customers is sensitive to variations in weather, particularly through the prime heating season of November to March. Additionally, changes in market value adjustments may cause significant fluctuations in net income due to the volatility of natural gas prices. Therefore, the condensed consolidated financial results for the first six months of 2020-21 should not be taken as indicative of the performance to be expected for the full year. In order to compare financial performance from period to period, the Corporation uses the following measures: income before unrealized market value adjustments; realized margin on commodity sales; and realized margin on asset optimization sales. Each measure removes the impact of fair value adjustments on financial and derivative instruments and the revaluation of natural gas in storage to the lower of cost and net realizable value. Unrealized market value adjustments vary considerably with market prices of natural gas, drive significant changes in the Corporation’s consolidated net income and may obscure other business factors that are also important to understanding the Corporation’s financial results. The measures referred to above are non-IFRS measures, in that there is no standardized definition, and may not be comparable to similar measures presented by other entities.

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INDUSTRY OVERVIEW

SaskEnergy monitors a number of important factors that could influence financial performance.

Oil Market Volatility

The prior fiscal year ended with the entire global energy complex in a state of uncertainty. Pandemic-related demand destruction combined with a geo-political supply glut had resulted in crude oil prices falling by over 60 per cent. The first two months of this fiscal year continued the trend of uncertainty and volatility. The end of April saw WTI prices trade below negative $30 per barrel as traders were faced with the prospect of continued low demand and a lack of storage to balance the market. Prices quickly recovered to around $40 per barrel and have remained range-bound for the last four months. The relative stability is notable as prices have been in a $9 range the last four months after spending the previous six months in a $90 range. Oil production has grown in importance for gas utilities, and SaskEnergy is no exception. Low oil prices can reduce demand for gas as customers engaged in enhanced oil recovery are faced with tighter margins. Reduced drilling and production of oil can result in lower production of associated natural gas. Utilization of gas infrastructure by associated gas producers can impact pipeline capacity and tolls in Saskatchewan.

Natural Gas Prices

Natural gas price volatility has been nearly the exact opposite of crude oil. With global storage levels and US production at all-time highs, the fall in natural gas prices preceded the broader pandemic slow down. From April until July, natural gas prices in North America, and Western Canada specifically, stayed within a relatively tight price band. This is in contrast to last summer when Alberta prices (AECO) were extremely volatile, often trading at or below $0 per GJ. Upstream system improvements have reduced some transportation bottlenecks leaving AECO prices more closely matched with other downstream prices. The result of this relative calm period has been reduced interest in exporting gas and increased injections into storage. As Alberta storage levels approached record highs, with a month of injection season remaining, uncertainty and volatility returned to the market. The localized volatility of AECO was compounded by continental volatility due to shifting weather forecasts, an active hurricane season, and shifting demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG) feedstock. Looking forward, uncertainty remains a theme for AECO prices. The NGTL 2021 Expansion Project, recommended by the Canada Energy Regulator in February, awaits final approval of the Federal Minister of Natural Resources. This project would further remove bottlenecks from the Alberta system and provide SaskEnergy with incremental capacity. In addition, the Temporary Service Protocol (TSP) that is currently in place is planned to expire at the end of October 2020, however a group of gas producers has requested the protocol extend until the NGTL 2021 Expansion Project is approved and placed into service.

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The AECO daily index averaged $2.00 per GJ throughout the six months ended September 30, 2020 compared to $0.99 per GJ the year prior. Traditionally, most natural gas in Saskatchewan (TEP) is priced at a differential to the AECO price. This AECO to TEP differential for the six months ended September 30, 2020 averaged $nil compared to $0.64 per GJ for the year prior. The decreased differential can be attributed to upstream system improvements and the Temporary Service Protocol discussed above. As transportation is made more readily available from production areas in northeast BC to delivery points in southwest SK, the price differentials should remain near the marginal cost of transportation.

The following chart shows AECO natural gas prices:

AECO Monthly Index Historical Prices

$3.50

Low Demand for Western Canadian Gas

Forward Price at Sept 30, 2020

$3.00

2015-Present Average Price $1.98/GJ

$2.50

$2.00

$1.50

$1.00

$0.50

$0.00

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL RESULTS Consolidated Net Income

Three months ended September 30,

Six months ended September 30,

(millions)

2020

2019 Change

2020

2019 Change

Impact of fair value adjustments Revaluation of natural gas in storage (Loss) income before unrealized market value adjustments

$

(14)

$

(2)

$

(12)

$

(18)

$

10

$

(28)

16

(17)

33

24

(27)

51

2

2

-

6

-

6

Consolidated net income (loss)

$

4

$

(17)

$

21

$

12

$

(17)

$

29

Excluding market value adjustments, financial results for six months ended September 30, 2020 are $28 million lower than the same period in 2019. The decrease in net income is due to a lower asset optimization margin and lower customer contribution revenues, in addition employee benefit and operating and maintenance costs increased compared to 2019-20.

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Reduced natural gas market price volatility limited the Corporation’s asset optimization opportunities while increasing natural gas market prices reduced the profitability of asset optimization opportunities the Corporation did have. In addition, as natural gas production in Saskatchewan continues to decline, the Province increasingly relies on gas production in Alberta to meet its delivery requirements. This results in increased transportation utilization with TC Energy’s system to import natural gas from Alberta. These increasing requirements have resulted in higher overall operating and maintenance costs as well as lower asset optimization margins as some transport capacity was secured through asset optimization contracts. Customer contribution revenue is also lower than prior year as there are fewer transmission customer connections in 2020-21 due to the current decline in the provincial economy. The prior year also included a large transmission system customer contribution. Market value adjustments improved SaskEnergy’s consolidated net income by $24 million. The price differential between contract prices and market prices on forward commodity and asset optimization purchase contracts improved in the current year as near term natural gas market prices increased compared to prices at September 30, 2019. The value of natural gas in storage is sensitive to natural gas market prices, which in the near term have increased and resulted in a decrease in the unfavourable revaluation of natural gas in storage. At September 30, 2020, the value of natural gas in storage was $49 million, or $1 million below cost. At the end of March 2020, the value of natural gas in storage was $13 million, or $7 million below cost. The difference between the $7 million unfavourable adjustment at the end of the previous fiscal year and the current $1 million unfavourable adjustment to the cost of gas in storage has been reported as a $6 million favourable market value adjustment during the six months ended September 30, 2020.

Natural Gas Sales and Purchases

Included within natural gas sales and purchases are rate-regulated commodity sales to distribution customers and non-regulated asset optimization activities. IFRS requires these activities to be presented together within the consolidated financial statements; however, the Corporation manages these activities as distinct and separate businesses and, as such, the MD&A addresses these natural gas sales and purchases separately. With the exception of those contracts entered into for an entity’s own usage, IFRS requires derivative instruments such as natural gas purchase and sales contracts to be recorded at fair value until their settlement date. Changes in the fair value of the derivative instruments, driven by changes in future natural gas prices, are recorded in net income through natural gas sales or natural gas purchases depending on the specific contract. Upon settlement of the natural gas contract, the amount paid or received by SaskEnergy becomes realized and is recorded in natural gas sales or purchases.

Commodity Margin

SaskEnergy sells natural gas to its distribution customers at a commodity rate approved by Provincial Cabinet based on the recommendations of the Saskatchewan Rate Review Panel (SRRP). The commodity rate, which is reviewed April 1 and November 1 of each year, is determined based on rate-setting principles and is designed to recover the realized costs associated with the sale of natural gas to distribution customers. Regulatory principles require that utilities do not earn a profit or realize losses on the sale of gas to customers over the long term. Consequently, SaskEnergy accumulates differences between the commodity revenue earned and the cost of natural gas sold in a Gas Cost Variance Account (GCVA). The balance in the GCVA, which is not included in SaskEnergy’s financial statements, is either recovered from, or refunded to, customers as part of future commodity rates.

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For financial reporting purposes, the Corporation prepares its financial statements on a consolidated basis while applying IFRS. Consequently, the amounts determined for rate-setting purposes are different than those reported within its consolidated financial statements. A gain or loss reported in the Corporation's consolidated financial statements may not be reflected in the GCVA. SaskEnergy’s natural gas price risk management program has two objectives: to reduce the impact of natural gas price volatility on the cost of gas and to support rates that are competitive with other utilities. Reducing the impact of price volatility requires establishing certainty in the cost of gas, while supporting competitive rates often means allowing purchase prices to follow market prices. As a result, the balance between the two objectives may change depending on current market conditions. In order to ensure a secure supply of natural gas, SaskEnergy contracts for the physical delivery of natural gas using non-financial derivatives, referred to as forward or physical natural gas contracts. The purchase price contained in these forward contracts may be fixed, or it may be based on a variable index price. While fixed price contracts reduce the impact of natural gas price volatility, variable or market prices can assist in offering competitive rates depending on the pricing environment. SaskEnergy may use financial derivatives and physical swaps to manage the future purchase price of natural gas.

The commodity margin on sales to customers, as reported in the condensed consolidated financial statements, was as follows:

Three months ended September 30,

September 30, Six months ended

(millions)

2020

2019 Change

2020

2019 Change

Commodity sales

$

10

$

(1)

$

30 27

$

4

$

9 9

$

34 33

Commodity purchases

9 1 1

-

(6) (2)

Realized margin on commodity sales Impact of fair value adjustments

-

(1)

1

3

14

13

19

-

19

Margin on commodity sales

$

14

$

2

$

12

$

20

$

3

$

17

The realized margin on commodity sales excludes the impact of unrealized fair value adjustments on derivative instruments, as these adjustments can fluctuate significantly from one period to the next and do not necessarily represent the amount that will be paid upon settlement of the related natural gas contract. The Corporation realized a $1 million margin on commodity sales for the six months ended September 30, 2020 compared to $3 million for the same period ended September 30, 2019. During 2020, average revenue was $2.49 per GJ and average cost of gas sold was $2.38 per GJ, resulting in a margin of $0.11 per GJ. The margin is $0.12 per GJ lower than the average commodity margin of $0.23 per GJ through the same six month period in 2019-20. With the AECO daily index averaging $2.00 per GJ throughout the six months ended September 30, 2020 compared to $0.99 per GJ the year prior, the effect was a higher cost of gas sold in 2020-21, which increased the Corporation’s average cost of commodity purchases while decreasing the realized margin on commodity sales. This was partially offset by the favourable impact of an additional 2 PJs sold in 2020 as weather was 5% colder through the six months ended September 30, 2020 compared to 2019. Meanwhile the GCVA balance has decreased to $7 million owing to customers, down $6 million from the $13 million owing to customers at March 31, 2020.

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The Corporation realized a margin of $nil on commodity sales for the three months ended September 30, 2020 compared to a margin of $1 million for the same three months ended September 30, 2019. The decreased margin is due to lower volumes sold during the three months ended September 30, 2020, as weather for the three months of 2020 was 12 percent warmer than normal compared to 12 per cent colder than normal for the same three months of 2019.

Commodity Fair Value Adjustments

Fair value adjustments at September 30, 2020 increased the margin on commodity sales by $19 million as the $4 million favourable fair value position at March 31, 2020 increased to $23 million favourable at September 30, 2020. The favourable price differential between contract prices and market prices on future commodity purchase contracts increased to $0.48 per GJ at September 2020 compared to a favourable price differential of $0.19 per GJ at March 31, 2020.

SaskEnergy segregates a portion of its natural gas purchase contracts for gas that will ultimately be sold to commodity customers. Under IFRS, such contracts are not required to be reported at market value.

Asset Optimization Margin

SaskEnergy uses its access to natural gas markets to execute purchases and sales of natural gas to generate margins. By utilizing off peak transportation and storage capacity and to help mitigate transportation constraints, SaskEnergy is able to find opportunities in the market to take advantage of pricing differentials between transportation hubs, delivery points and time periods while minimizing its exposure to price risk. In most cases the purchases and sales are executed at the same time, thereby mitigating much of the price risk that would normally be associated with such transactions. SaskEnergy also uses purchases and sales of natural gas to mitigate transportation constraints, which are executed at a cost.

The asset optimization margin, as reported in the condensed consolidated financial statements, was as follows:

Three months ended September 30,

Six months ended September 30,

(millions)

2020

2019 Change

2020

2019 Change

Asset optimization sales

$

33 33

$

31 28

$

2

$

70 74

$

66 59

$

4

Asset optimization purchases

(5) (3)

(15) (11)

Realized margin on asset optimization sales Impact of fair value adjustments Revaluation of natural gas in storage

-

3

(4)

7

2 2

(19)

21

5 6

(27)

32

2

-

-

6

Margin on asset optimization sales

$

4

$

(14)

$

18

$

7

$

(20)

$

27

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The realized margin on asset optimization sales at September 30, 2020, which removes fair value adjustments on derivative instruments and the revaluation of natural gas in storage, was a $4 million loss, $11 million lower than the $7 million favourable margin for the same period in 2019. At the beginning of October 2019, TC Energy enacted a temporary policy, which reduced natural gas price volatility while contributing to stronger natural gas pricing. Reducing natural gas price volatility limited SaskEnergy’s asset optimization opportunities, as asset optimization sales decreased 9 PJs in 2020 compared to 2019, resulting in a $3 million unfavourable volume variance. Stronger natural gas market pricing, evident by the AECO daily index averaging $2.00 per GJ throughout the six months ended September 30, 2020 compared to $0.99 per GJ the year prior, resulted in the average cost of asset optimization purchases increasing $0.70 per GJ in 2020 compared to 2019. This reduced the realized margin on asset optimization sales by $4 million through the six months ended September 30, 2020 compared to the same period in 2019-20. To mitigate transportation capacity within Alberta and to meet increasing customer obligations in Saskatchewan, the Corporation secured 5 PJ of incremental asset optimization transportation contracts on TC Energy’s NGTL Alberta system at an additional cost of $3 million for the six months ended September 30, 2020 compared to the same period in 2019. This resulted in an unfavourable effect on the 2020 asset optimization purchase costs and the realized margin on asset optimization sales compared to 2019.

Asset Optimization Fair Value Adjustments

The Corporation enters into various natural gas contracts in its asset optimization strategies, which are subject to volatility of natural gas market prices. At September 30, 2020, the fair value adjustment on asset optimization derivative instruments increased the margin on asset optimization sales by $5 million compared to a decrease of $27 million for the same period in 2019-20. Stronger natural gas market prices resulted in the price differential between contract prices and market prices on future asset optimization purchase contracts improving to $0.11 per GJ favourable at September 2020 compared to an unfavourable price differential of $0.20 per GJ at March 31, 2020. This $0.31 per GJ favourable change in the price differential on asset optimization purchase contracts in 2020-21 resulted in a $10 million favourable fair value adjustment, which was partially offset by the $5 million unfavourable variance related to a $0.27 per GJ increase in the unfavourable price differentials on outstanding asset optimization sale contracts.

Revaluation of Natural Gas in Storage

At each reporting period, the Corporation measures the net realizable value of natural gas in storage held for asset optimization transactions based on forward market prices and anticipated delivery dates. The carrying amount of natural gas in storage is adjusted to reflect the lower of weighted average cost and net realizable value. Near term forward natural gas market prices increased since March 2020, consequently, the net realizable value of asset optimization natural gas in storage was $1 million below cost at September 30, 2020, which is a $6 million favourable adjustment to net income from the $7 million unfavourable revaluation adjustment recorded as at March 31, 2020.

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Revenue

Delivery revenue, transportation and storage revenue and customer capital contributions, as reported in the consolidated financial statements, were as follows:

September 30, Three months ended

Six months ended September 30,

(millions)

2020

2019 Change

2020

2019 Change

Delivery revenue

$

41 46

$

41 48 11

$

-

$

99 93 10

$

95 94 20

$

4

Transportation and storage revenue Customer capital contributions

(2) (3)

(1)

8

(10)

Revenue

$

95

$

100

$

(5)

$

202

$

209

$

(7)

Delivery Revenue

Delivery revenue is driven by the number of customers and the amount of natural gas they consume. As residential and commercial customers consume natural gas primarily as heating fuel, weather is the external factor that most affects delivery revenue. Delivery revenue of $99 million for the six months ended September 30, 2020 was $4 million higher than the same period in 2019. The increased delivery revenue is due to spring weather for three months ended June 30, 2020 being 18 per cent colder than normal and 15 per cent colder than the same three months in 2019-20.

Transportation and Storage Revenue

The Corporation generates transportation revenue by receiving gas from customers at various receipt points in Saskatchewan and Alberta, and delivering natural gas to customers at various delivery points in the province. The transportation toll structure consists of a receipt service charge that customers pay when they put gas on to the natural gas transportation system, and a delivery service charge, which customers pay when they take delivery off the natural gas transportation system. Gas delivered to the system by customers is considered to be part of the TransGas Energy Pool (a notional point where producers, marketers and end users can match supplies to demand) until it is delivered to the end-use customer. For receipt and delivery services, the Corporation offers both firm and interruptible transportation. Under a firm service contract, the customer has a right to deliver or receive a specified quantity of gas on each day of the contract. With a firm contract, customers pay for the amount of capacity they have contracted for whether they use it or not. Under an interruptible contract, customers may deliver or receive gas only when there is available capacity on the system and pay receipt and delivery tolls when they deliver or receive gas.

Integral to the Corporation’s transmission system are several strategically located natural gas storage sites, which have the capacity to provide operational flexibility along with a reliable and competitive natural gas storage service.

Transportation and storage revenue was $93 million for the six months ended September 30, 2020, $1 million lower than the same period in 2019. Contracted demand and interruptible volumes relating to export sales decreased by $4 million as demand for natural gas in eastern Canada declined. This is partially offset by increased delivery service revenue of $3 million, as Industrial customer and power generation related load growth increased demand for natural gas within the province and is driving higher contract demand transportation revenue.

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Included in transportation and storage revenue is storage revenue of $5 million for the six months ended September 30, 2020, which equals the previous year. The apparent abundance of natural gas, coupled with small or even negative differentials between current and forward natural gas prices, limits the demand for natural gas storage to those customers with relatively low load factors who use the service to mitigate receipt transportation charges.

Customer Capital Contributions

The Corporation receives capital contributions from customers to partially offset the cost of constructing facilities to connect them to the transmission and distribution systems. Generally, contributions related to transmission system projects tend to be larger but less frequent than contributions related to the distribution system. The volume and magnitude of customer contribution revenue can vary significantly period-over-period as various factors influence their receipt and recognition as revenue. Customer capital contribution revenue of $10 million for the six months ended September 30, 2020 was $10 million lower than 2019-20 due to distribution customer connections decreasing by $7 million and transmission system customer connections decreasing by $3 million in the current period.

Other Expenses

SaskEnergy’s expenses are driven to a large degree by its investment in its transmission, distribution and storage systems. Depreciation expense, net finance expense and Saskatchewan taxes are directly tied to the investment in facilities. As the level of investment in these facilities increase, these expenses also increase. Employee benefit costs and operating and maintenance costs are also driven by the investment in assets, although less directly. As the number of customers increases, and infrastructure to serve those customers grows, the costs to operate and maintain the system increases. These expenses increase primarily because the amount of work to service and maintain the natural gas system increases as the kilometres of gas line, number of service connections, and amount of compression equipment increases. Additional regulatory requirements and changing public perceptions have resulted in accelerated prevention, detection and mitigation initiatives, adding pressure to transmission, distribution and storage rates.

Other expenses, net finance expenses and other gains, as reported in the condensed consolidated financial statements, were as follows:

Three months ended September 30,

Six months ended September 30,

(millions)

2020

2019 Change

2020

2019 Change

Employee benefits

$

22 39 28

$

19 39 27

$

(3)

$

47 77 57

$

43 76 53

$

(4) (1) (4)

Operating and maintenance Depreciation and amortization

-

(1)

Saskatchewan taxes

6

6 1

-

9 2

9 1

-

Impairment loss

-

1

(1)

$

95

$

92

$

(3)

$

192

$

182

$

(10)

Net finance expenses

$

14

$

14

$

-

$

27

$

27

$

-

Other gains

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

(2)

$

-

$

2

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Employee Benefits

Employee benefit costs of $47 million were $4 million higher for the six months ended September 30, 2020 compared to the same period in the prior year, as vacant positions in strategic areas of the business have been filled to continue to meet the Corporation’s current and future business needs. Ongoing efficiency efforts and management of planned overtime and vacancies resulted in a reduction of full time equivalents in other areas partially offsetting these increases.

Operating and Maintenance

Operating and maintenance costs of $77 million for the six months ended September 30, 2020 are $1 million higher than the same period in 2019-20. Higher transportation contracted by the Corporation on TC Energy’s transportation system increased operating and maintenance expenses by $2 million in 2020-21 compared to 2019- 20. Growing demand for imported natural gas from Alberta is resulting in more natural gas being transported and over greater distances. In addition, the provision for bad debts increased $1 million and carbon tax payments are $1 million higher in 2020 compared to 2019. The provision for bad debt increased in 2020 as Saskatchewan’s unemployment rate increased, a result of the impact of COVID-19 and a subsequent economic downturn causing higher expected credit losses. SaskEnergy was able to partially mitigate the impact of increased costs through continued efficiency efforts of $3 million resulting from reducing contracts and consulting, sustenance and vehicle costs in 2020 compared to 2019.

Depreciation and Amortization

Balancing safety and system integrity with the growing demand for service continues through 2020-21. Strategic capital investments required to ensure the necessary infrastructure is in place to meet increasing load growth, has increased the capital asset base from the previous year, resulting in increased depreciation and amortization. For the six months ended September 30, 2020, depreciation and amortization was $57 million, which was $4 million higher than the same period in 2019-20.

Net Finance Expense

Net finance expenses were $27 million for the six months ended September 30, 2020 as higher debt retirement fund earnings and lower short-term debt interest expense was fully offset by higher long-term debt interest expense.

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LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

As a Crown corporation, SaskEnergy’s primary sources of capital are cash from operations, debt — which is borrowed through the province’s General Revenue Fund — and equity advances from CIC, the Province’s Crown corporation holding company. Equity advances are rarely used to finance Crown corporations as CIC prefers to use its Subsidiary Crown Dividend Policy to manage its equity interests in its commercial enterprises. Cash from operations is SaskEnergy’s most important source of capital. As a utility, cash from operations is relatively stable and the Corporation relies upon it to fund its investment in natural gas facilities, including new construction to support provincial growth and integrity spending on existing infrastructure. Long and short-term debt can be borrowed through the Province of Saskatchewan to meet any long or short-term incremental capital requirements, and to repay debt as it matures. Sources of liquidity include Order in Council authority to borrow up to $500 million in short-term loans, and a $35 million uncommitted line of credit with the Toronto-Dominion Bank. By borrowing through the Province, SaskEnergy has access to the Province’s borrowing capacity and North American capital markets. Throughout 2020-21, The SaskEnergy Act allows the Corporation to borrow up to $2,500 million.

Three months ended September 30,

Six months ended September 30,

(millions)

2020

2019 Change

2020

2019 Change

Cash provided by operating activities Cash used in investing activities Cash provided by financing activities Increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

$

25

$

48

$

(23)

$

81

$

109

$

(28)

(61)

(104)

43

(103)

(161)

58

39

35

4

26

47

(21)

$

3

$

(21)

$

24

$

4

$

(5)

$

9

Operating Activities

Cash provided by operating activities was $81 million for the six months ended September 30, 2020, a decrease of $28 million from 2019-20. Cash flows from operations decreased due to lower asset optimization margins, lower customer contribution revenue and higher employee benefit costs.

Investing Activities

Cash used in investing activities totaled $103 million for the six months ended September 30, 2020, $58 million less than the six months ended September 30, 2019. Capital investment levels declined in 2020-21 due to the deferral of some system expansion projects resulting from changing customer requirements. In addition, the prior year included substantial system expansion spending around the city of Saskatoon. Decreased spending on risk management activities relating to distribution system service upgrade projects also contributed to the decline in spending on investing activities in 2020.

Financing Activities

Cash provided by financing activities of $26 million through the six months ended September 30, 2020 declined $21 million compared to the $47 million provided in 2019-20. The Corporation used $29 million for interest payments, $34 million to pay long-term debt, and $67 million to pay short-term debt. The Corporation borrowed an additional $150 million in long-term debt at a premium of $10 million to support its capital investment requirements and repay short-term debt. SaskEnergy’s debt ratio at the end of September 30, 2020 of 59 per cent debt and 41 per cent equity is within the Corporation’s long-term target range of 58 to 63 per cent debt.

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15

CAPITAL ADDITIONS

Capital additions, as reported in the consolidated financial statements, were as follows:

Three months ended September 30,

Six months ended September 30,

(millions)

2020

2019 Change

2020

2019 Change

Strategic

Customer growth System expansion

$

13 18 31

$

19 39 58

$

(6)

$

21 34 55

$

28 67 95

$

(7)

(21) (27)

(33) (40)

Operational

Risk management

17

31

(14)

29 11

43 13

(14)

Reliability of natural gas service

7 2

8 4

(1) (2)

(2) (2)

Business and technology optimization

4

6

26

43

(17)

44

62

(18)

Capital additions

$

57

$

101

$

(44)

$

99

$

157

$

(58)

Capital additions during the six months ended September 30, 2020 of $99 million were $58 million lower than prior year as spending declined, primarily during the second quarter of 2020-21 compared to 2019-20.

Higher system expansion spending of $29 million on transmission urban infrastructure projects in 2019 resulted from growth in and around the City of Saskatoon. This consisted of a multi-year initiative that addressed increased natural gas capacity and moving high pressure transmission lines further away from populated areas. The initiative was completed in 2019-20 and is the primary driver of 2019 system expansion spending being $33 million higher in 2019 than 2020. Spending on customer growth projects declined $7 million in 2020 compared to 2019, a result of the economic downturn resulting from the effects of a suppressed oil and gas market and COVID-19. This consists of a $4 million decrease in spending on distribution system mains and services growth projects in urban and rural areas, combined with spending on transmission system delivery service tie-ins declining $4 million. Both declines are a result of decreasing customer demand for new services and customers deferring capital projects in 2020. The declines were partially offset by higher spending of $1 million in 2020 on distribution system projects relating to large industrial customers, as industrial sectors of the provincial economy remain less impacted by the effects of the oil and gas market or COVID-19. Risk management spending on distribution system integrity projects declined $14 million year-over-year as service upgrade projects have been reduced or deferred in 2020, while spending on transmission system integrity projects was consistent year-over-year.

2020-21 Second Quarter Report

16

OUTLOOK

SaskEnergy continues to focus on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, promoting and maintaining the health and safety of the Corporation’s personnel and the public while maintaining its ability to deliver core services. In addition to the pandemic, the volatility of global oil prices continues to create uncertainty for producers and consumers of natural gas. Over 70 per cent of the production of natural gas in Saskatchewan is associated with oil production; hence, as oil producers were forced to shut-in wells due to record low oil prices, associated natural gas production was also shut-in. The reduction in Saskatchewan gas supply will require more natural gas to be imported from Alberta. Changing customer demand, global supply chain disruptions, and social distancing requirements have caused challenges and delays to system improvement projects, but have not impacted the Corporation’s ability to transport or market natural gas. SaskEnergy will continue to monitor and manage the impact of both COVID-19 and the volatility of oil prices on its business strategies as both situations evolve.

2020-21 Second Quarter Report

17

Consolidated Financial Statements

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

As at September 30, 2020 (unaudited)

As at March 31, 2020 (audited)

(millions)

Notes

Assets Current assets Cash and cash equivalents

$

5

$

1

Trade and other receivables

93 49 15

155

Natural gas in storage held for resale

4

13 13 11 15

Inventory of supplies Debt retirement funds

-

Fair value of derivative instruments

5

31

193

208

Right-of-use assets Intangible assets

14 73

15 73

Property, plant and equipment

2,797

2,801

Debt retirement funds

140

125

$

3,217

$

3,222

Liabilities and Province's equity Current liabilities Short-term debt

$

212

$

279 120

Trade and other payables

95

Dividends payable

3

2

Current portion of long-term debt

6

-

34 19

Contract liability Refund liability

32

7

7

Fair value of derivative instruments Current portion of lease liability

5 7

12

21

6

6

367

488

Lease liability

7

6 5

7 5

Employee future benefits

Provisions

238

292

Deferred revenue Long-term debt

5

5

6

1,485 2,106

1,325 2,122

Province's equity

Equity advances

72

72

Other components of equity

8

4

Retained earnings

1,031 1,111

1,024 1,100

$

3,217

$

3,222

(See accompanying notes)

2020-21 Second Quarter Report

18

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (unaudited)

For the Three Months Ended September 30, 2020

For the Three Months Ended September 30, 2019

Income before Unrealized Market Value Adjustments

Unrealized Market Value Adjustments (Note 9)

Income before Unrealized Market Value Adjustments

Unrealized Market Value Adjustments (Note 9)

Total

Total

(millions)

Notes

Revenue Natural gas sales

10 11 12

$

42 41 46

$

(3)

$

39 41 46

$

41 41 48 11

$

(2)

$

39 41 48 11

Delivery

- - -

- - -

Transportation and storage Customer capital contributions

8

8

137

(3)

134

141

(2)

139

Expenses Natural gas purchases (net of change in inventory)

10

42 22 39 28

(21)

21 22 39 28

37 19 39 27

13

50 19 39 27

Employee benefits

- - - - -

- - - - -

Operating and maintenance Depreciation and amortization

Saskatchewan taxes

6

6

6 1

6 1

Impairment loss on trade and other receivables

-

-

137

(21)

116

129

13

142

Net income before the following

-

18

18

12

(15)

(3)

Finance income Finance expenses

13 13 13

1

- - -

1

1

- - -

1

(15) (14)

(15) (14)

(15) (14)

(15) (14)

Net finance expenses

Total net (loss) income

$

(14)

$

18

$

4

$

(2)

$

(15)

$

(17)

Items that may be reclassified back to profit or loss

Change in fair value of debt retirement funds designated as FVOCI

-

(1)

(1)

-

1

1

Comprehensive (loss) income

$

(14)

$

17

$

3

$

(2)

$

(14)

$

(16)

(See accompanying notes)

2020-21 Second Quarter Report

19

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (unaudited)

For the Six Months Ended September 30, 2020

For the Six Months Ended September 30, 2019

Income before Unrealized Market Value Adjustments

Unrealized Market Value Adjustments (Note 9)

Income before Unrealized Market Value Adjustments

Unrealized Market Value Adjustments (Note 9)

Total

Total

(millions)

Notes

Revenue Natural gas sales

10 11 12

$

104

$

(5)

$

99 99 93 10

$

96 95 94 20

$

3

$

99 95 94 20

Delivery

99 93 10

- - -

- - -

Transportation and storage Customer capital contributions

306

(5)

301

305

3

308

Expenses Natural gas purchases (net of change in inventory)

10

107

(35)

72 47 77 57

86 43 76 53

30

116

Employee benefits

47 77 57

- - - - -

- - - - -

43 76 53

Operating and maintenance Depreciation and amortization

Saskatchewan taxes

9 2

9 2

9 1

9 1

Impairment loss on trade and other receivables

299

(35)

264

268

30

298

Net income before the following

7

30

37

37

(27)

10

Finance income Finance expenses

13 13 13

3

- - -

3

2

- - -

2

(30) (27)

(30) (27)

(29) (27)

(29) (27)

Net finance expenses

Other gains

2

-

2

-

-

-

Total net (loss) income

$

(18)

$

30

$

12

$

10

$

(27)

$

(17)

Items that may be reclassified back to profit or loss

Change in fair value of debt retirement funds designated as FVOCI

-

4

4

-

3

3

Comprehensive (loss) income

$

(18)

$

34

$

16

$

10

$

(24)

$

(14)

(See accompanying notes)

2020-21 Second Quarter Report

20

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY (unaudited)

Other Components of Equity

Retained Earnings

Equity Advances

Total

(millions)

Balance as at April 1, 2019 as previously stated

$

1,024

$

72

$

2

$

1,098

Prior period adjustment

15

(19)

-

-

(19)

Restated balance as at April 1, 2019

1,005

72

2 3

1,079

Comprehensive income

(17)

-

(14)

Balance as at September 30, 2019

988

72

5

1,065

Balance as at April 1, 2020 Comprehensive income

1,024

72

4 4

1,100

12

- -

16

Dividends

(5)

-

(5)

Balance as at September 30, 2020

$

1,031

$

72

$

8

$

1,111

(See accompanying notes)

2020-21 Second Quarter Report

21

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