Admissions Presentation Slides

UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS AND STANDARDIZED TESTING

Arun Alagappan President,Advantage Testing and The Advantage Testing Foundation

www.advantagetesting.com

Testing and University Admissions Policies

The SAT or the ACT?

OVERVIEW

SAT Subject Tests

How to Prepare

TESTING AND UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS POLICIES

Uneven grading systems

WHY USE STANDARDIZED TESTS?

Grade inflation

Diamonds in the rough

• “One hundred years’ evidence suggests that testing increases achievement.”

• “Testing with feedback produces the strongest positive effect on achievement.”

WHAT MATTERS TO UNIVERSITIES?

Academics

Secondary School

Standardized test scores

WHAT MATTERS TO UNIVERSITIES?

GPA

SAT or ACT

Class rank

SAT Subject Tests

Rigor of curriculum

Extracurricular activities Special talent/ability

WHAT MATTERS TO UNIVERSITIES?

Athletics

Social service

Professional experience

Personal statement School recommendation Teacher recommendations

WHAT MATTERS TO UNIVERSITIES?

Personal interview

• Character/personal qualities • Leadership • Ethics • Sensitivity • Diversity • Ethnic • Socioeconomic • Geographic • Other • Alumni relation/legacy • Level of applicant interest

WHAT MATTERS TO UNIVERSITIES?

Ø Early Decision (commitment) Ø Early Action (no commitment) Ø Single-Choice Early Action (no commitment)

ADMISSIONS NOTIFICATIONS POLICIES

SAT OR ACT?

SAT

ACT

SAT VS . ACT

Required sections

Reading Writing and Language Math–No Calculator Math–Calculator

Reading English Math Science

Length

3 hours + 50-minute optional essay

2 hours and 55 minutes + 40-minute optional essay

Answer choices

4; some grid-in Math

4; 5 in Math

Scoring

400–1600 composite, two scores combined

1–36 composite, average of each section

ACT SCIENCE TEST

• 40 questions on 6 passages • 35 minutes • Tests interpretation, analysis, evaluation, and problem-solving • Some scientific knowledge required

GROWING POPULARITY OF ACT

• Fewer distractors • Curricular relevance • Less vocabulary • Easier reading • Introduced score choice

• College preparedness • Greater rigor • Recover market share

CHANGES TO THE SAT

ACT Composite SAT Composite Percentile 34 1520–1550 99 28 1310–1340 88 22 1100–1140 58 15 810–840 10

ACT/SAT CONCORDANCE TABLES

• Score choice • Single-sitting highest scores • Superscore • Full disclosure • Cancellation • Special requirements

REPORTING SCORES: WHAT TO KNOW

SAT SUBJECT TESTS

Science: Biology E/M, Chemistry, Physics

Standard: French, German, Modern Hebrew, Italian, Latin, Spanish With listening: French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, Korean

Languages

SUBJECTS TESTED

History: US,World

Literature

Math: Level 1, Level 2

Math 1

Math 2

Number of questions

50

50

Calculator

Permitted

Permitted (and more frequently needed)

Topics

Math concepts similar to SAT

More complex math

3 years of secondary-level math: 2 algebra, 1 geometry

Recommended curricular background

4 years of secondary-level math: trigonometry or pre-calculus

Curve

Difficult

Generous

WHICH SUBJECT TEST IN MATH?

UNDERSTANDING CURVES

• Key data points • Raw score (varies per test) • Number of questions • answered correctly • answered incorrectly • Scaled score (200–800) • Percentile (0–99)

Math 1

Math 2

Scaled score

800

800

Raw score

49–50

44–50

Percentile

99 th

81 st

MATH SUBJECT TEST CURVES

UNDERSTANDING CURVES

DIFFICULT CURVES

GENEROUS CURVES

• Math Level 1 • Spanish • Biology • Chemistry

• World History • U.S. History • Math Level 2

• Physics • French • Latin

• German • Japanese • Korean

DATES OFFERED

• See charts • Note restrictions

HOW TO PREPARE

QUALITIES IN EXCELLENT TUTORS

• Motivators • Well-evaluated • Energetic • Approachable • Top performers • Dedicated instructors

WORKING WITH EXCELLENT TUTORS

• Effectiveness of 1-on-1 • Rigorous standards • Sensitivity to individual needs

• Nowhere to hide • Learning to learn • Distance learning

STUDY INDEPENDENTLY

PRACTICE. PRACTICE. PRACTICE.

CAN STANDARDIZED TESTS DELIVER GREATER OPPORTUNITY FOR ALL STUDENTS?

THE ADVANTAGE TESTING FOUNDATION

TRIALS TRAINING AND RECRUITMENT INITIATIVE FOR ADMISSION TO LEADING LAW SCHOOLS

WHO ARE TRIALS SCHOLARS?

• 20 students selected from more than 2,000 applicants • Selected on basis of academic achievement, community

service, and history of overcoming adversity

LAW SCHOOL ADMISSIONS

• Multiple admissions to all top-10 law schools • 80% of Trials graduates in law school attend a top-10 school

HARVARD LAW SCHOOL

Since 2009, 39 Trials scholars have been admitted to Harvard Law School

• Trials alumni include: • Multiple Fulbright Scholars

• Two Marshall Scholars • Three Rhodes Finalists • A Rhodes Scholar

TRIALS HONORS

MP4G ADVANTAGE TESTING FOUNDATION’S MATH PRIZE FOR GIRLS

AT FOUNDATION’ S MATH PRIZE FOR GIRLS

• Largest math prize for girls in the world • More than 1,400 unique contestants • In 2016, 85 volunteers helped run the event

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

• Susan Hockfield, then President of MIT • MacArthur Genius AwardWinners Dina Katabi, Esther Duflo and StephenWolfram • Yale Professor Priya Natarajan • MIT Professors Shafi Goldwasser and Nancy Hopkins • Princeton Professor Corina Tarnita

BOARD OF ADVISORS INCLUDES

• Michael Sipser, Dean of the School of Science at MIT • Maria Klawe, President of Harvey Mudd College & former Dean of the School of Engineering at Princeton • Leading mathematicians on the faculties of Berkeley, Stanford, and Harvard including Iona Dumitriu, Gigliola Staffilani, and Melanie MatchettWood

LEDA LEADERSHIP ENTERPRISE FOR A DIVERSE AMERICA

• 82% of most recent cohort are first-generation college students • Median household income is $28,402

LEDA

COLLEGE ADMI SS IONS

• Of the 100 students in LEDA’s Cohort 10: • 99 admitted to AT LEAST one “Most Competitive” School (Barron’s) • 49 admitted to Harvard,Yale, Princeton, or Stanford

THANK YOU

www.advantagetesting.com

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