M3 PT - March 2019

WEST HILLS 7230 MEDICAL CENTER DRIVE, SUITE 401 WEST HILLS, CA 91307 WEST LOS ANGELES 10474 SANTA MONICA BLVD., SUITE 435 LOS ANGELES, CA 90025

WWW.M3PT.COM / LA · 310.275.4137 / WEST HILLS · 747.888.3562 / MARCH 2019

M3 AND ME

Some of my own patients may not know this, but when I’m not helping people move better here at the clinic, I’m rehearsing for my next big opera performance. I’ll practice singing on my way to work and try to carve out time during the week to visit my vocal coach. And of course, I drive out to East LA every Sunday and practice alongside the professionals at LA Opera for 4–5 hours. It’s a lot to balance with the full schedule that comes from being a physical therapist, but when it’s something you love, you make it work. Opera is a new avenue of expression for me, although I’ve been involved in choir singing my whole life. My mom deserves a lot of the credit for this — she was a professional singer who toured the country as part of a road show in the 1960s. With her as an example, I was almost always involved in one choir or another, be it in church, school, or a community production. Even when I went back east as part of my therapist studies, I found time for singing. TAKING THE STAGE WHEN I’M NOT IN THE CLINIC, I’M PERFORMING

Upon returning to Los Angeles, I got involved with LA Opera. The organization is community focused, aimed at giving local singers of all levels the chance to perform alongside the greats. It seemed like the perfect fit for me to continue practicing my art while remaining fully dedicated to my patients. In fact, I’ve found great success integrating music into my therapy sessions in the past. Once, I had the pleasure of working with a gentleman who’d been a ballroom dancer his whole life. Unfortunately, he’d sustained a brain

injury that made walking difficult and dancing next to impossible. But with the help of his wife, a professional dancer herself, we were able to make a simple box step part of his therapy. I’ll never forget the look of joy on that patient’s face as we were able to get him moving to the music again.

Transitioning from choir singing to opera was a workout for me as well. The storytelling in operatic epics is as much physical as it is vocal — after years of stationary singing, the action- packed emotional performances proved quite

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demanding. I persevered and performed as part of the ensemble in Mozart’s “Coronation Mass in C” last June. As I write this, I’m getting ready to take to the stage again. This month, I’ll be performing in LA Opera’s production of “The Story of Moses.” The performance will be held at the historic Our Lady of The Angels Cathedral at 555 W. Temple St., just a few blocks from the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Tickets are free but are limited to four per household. There is also a $1 processing charge. If you like community opera, want to experience it for the first time, or just want to see what I’ve been working on outside the clinic, come watch the show! I’d love to see you there!

“I’LL NEVER FORGET THE LOOK OF JOY ON THAT PATIENT’S FACE AS WE WERE ABLE TO GET HIM MOVING TO THE MUSIC AGAIN.”

I was particularly grateful to get to do my last therapist rotation at the University of Michigan Hospital. Being a part of the campus community, I was able to audition for and become a member of the university choir. As a part of that collegiate troupe, I took part in several major performances, including two at Carnegie Hall. That’s what really gave me a taste for being a part of these larger staged productions.

–Roberta Brehm

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GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR DIGITAL HOME ASSISTANT

More and more people are welcoming in the Amazon Echo or the Google Home into their spaces. Everyone knows they make great Bluetooth speakers and can tell you the weather forecast, but they’re also capable of so much more. Digital assistants can do a variety of tasks depending on how much you want them to do for you. For example, if you want your digital assistant to be heavily involved in your daily life, you can use the Echo or the Home as the core of your “connected home.” You can connect numerous compatible devices to these assistants, including other Bluetooth or networked speakers, lights, thermostats, coffee makers, refrigerators, and even microwaves. Of course, therein lies the challenge — you must have compatible devices to make a connected home efficient. And let’s be honest: Many of us aren’t going to buy a connected fridge or Wi-Fi enabled lightbulbs just to get the most out of our digital assistants. What you can do, however, is make use of what you already have. Here are some ways to put your digital assistants to work without committing to a connected home.

Both the Echo and the Home make excellent communication hubs. In the home, they can be used as a local intercom system. Do you have a few Echo Dots or Google Home Minis? If you do, you’re set. You can communicate in any room where another device is present. Your digital assistant can also make outgoing calls. As long as the device has access to your contacts (or the person you’re trying to contact has an Echo or Home), you can easily make the connection. Want to send a text message? No problem! You can dictate a text to anyone in your smartphone’s contact list and send it without ever touching your phone. Aside from communications, the assistants can handle calendars, appointments, emails, and more. You can ask for information relevant to you, like “When is my flight again?” Google Home can recognize your voice, or the voice of anyone in the house, and respond accordingly. There’s no worry that anyone’s calendar or appointments will be mixed up with yours. If you want to learn more, search for tutorials online. We’ve only scratched the surface when it comes to what these digital assistants can do for you.

AN ARM AND A LEG OVERCOMING THE CHALLENGES OF LYMPHEDEMA

There are few things more terrifying than no longer recognizing your own body. While we might assume those “surprising changes” mostly stop after puberty, this crisis is what many patients experience when they are diagnosed with lymphedema. Lymphedema is a condition in which damage to your lymphatic system causes fluid to build up in the fatty tissue beneath your skin, causing areas of your body to swell to alarming size. Lymphedema is usually confined to the arm or leg, but in some cases, it can occur in the face, neck, breast, chest, underarm, and abdomen.

• Undergoing surgery or radiation therapy for any type of cancer, most often breast cancer, prostate cancer, or pelvic area cancers • Scar tissue in the lymphatic ducts, veins, or under the collarbones • Inflammation in the arm or leg after surgery • Age • Excess weight or obesity • Rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis Decreased mobility due to a swollen limb can lead to major lifestyle changes. Patients with lymphedema often aren’t able to work or enjoy their favorite activities as easily as they used to. Plus they are more likely to get sick because it becomes more difficult for their body to fight off infection. Fortunately, lymphedema patients don’t have to give up hope and

resign themselves to a lifetime of struggle. Through physical therapy, it is possible to reduce the effects of lymphedema and improve your life. Using your muscles helps lymphatic fluid to drain properly, but it’s important to remember that some exercises can increase your chances of lymphedema. Ideally, you want an exercise plan customized to your needs that focuses on solving the problem and doesn’t put you at risk for further injury. Instead of starting a workout routine that could potentially harm you, your physical therapist can teach you the best exercises to treat lymphedema. If you are at risk, call M3 Physical Therapy at 310.275.4137. Be proactive and learn what to do before your body starts to suffer.

Factors that may increase your risk for developing lymphedema include:

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PEDIATRIC SPORTS REHAB KEEPING YOUR KIDS HAPPY, HEALTHY, AND ACTIVE

INJURIES

March Madness is here once again, and fans of all ages are excited to watch one of the most highly anticipated tournaments of the year. All that basketball watching also inspires kids to get out and show off their own moves. However, in all the excitement, accidents can happen, and injuries can occur. If your child is injured, the physical therapists at M3 are here to help them return to the game in no time. Our pediatric therapists treat children who suffer from a variety of sports- related injuries and have the experience to guide them to a full recovery. THE ROLE OF A PEDIATRIC THERAPIST When a child is injured, their injuries will be different from an adult’s. Because of the difference in physiology and anatomy, physical therapy treatments vary. For example, a child can suffer injuries to growth plates, while adults cannot, since they no longer have any. Pediatric therapists spend years studying these differences. They know the best treatment the child may need to increase their mobility and regain their strength to get back to normal.

A pediatric therapist can diagnose, treat, and manage multiple sports injuries or health problems that kids suffer. Here is a list of a few injuries pediatric PTs treat:

Dislocations

• Sprains and strains

• Concussions

Exercise-induced asthma

• Overuse injuries

Minor avulsions and fractures

Nutrition and supplement issues

We understand how important it is for your kid to enjoy their life to the fullest. While an injury may have your kid sitting on the sidelines for a while, it doesn’t mean they’ll have to give up their active life. Call M3 PT today to find out how our physical therapists can get your kid back out on the court.

SOBA NOODLES WITH GARLIC AND ZUCCHINI

TAKE A BREAK

INGREDIENTS

• 4 ounces soba noodles • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 2–3 cloves garlic, grated • 1 tablespoon ginger, peeled and grated • 1/4 cup soy sauce • 2 tablespoons water • 1/2 small red onion, thinly sliced • 1 small zucchini, julienned into noodle strands

DIRECTIONS

1. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add soba noodles and cook until tender, about 4–5 minutes. Drain and rinse with cold water, then set aside. 2. In a large skillet or wok over medium-low heat, warm olive oil until barely shimmering. Add grated garlic and ginger, and cook for 1 minute. Pour in soy sauce and water, and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer for 2 minutes. 3. Add onions, simmering for 3 minutes. Stir in zucchini and cook for an additional 90 seconds. 4. Add soba noodles and toss to fully coat. Serve immediately, or cool and serve as a cold dish.

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10474 SANTA MONICA BLVD, SUITE 435 LOS ANGELES, CA 90025 PHONE: 310.275.4137 FAX: 310.274.1815

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE

1

Roberta’s Upcoming Opera Performance

2

Are You Getting the Most Out of Your Digital Home Assistant?

2

Can PT Help with the Pain of Lymphedema?

3

What Is Pediatric Therapy?

3

Soba Noodles With Garlic and Zucchini

4

How to Make Your Sailing Dreams Come True

FORMERLY KNOWN AS WILSHIRE LINDEN PHYSICAL THERAPY — SAME TEAM, NEW NAME!

SET SAIL FOR VACATION TAKE YOUR NEXT TRIP OFFSHORE

If you’re lucky enough to have been aboard a ship under full sail, chances are you know the thrill and serenity sailing can give you. If you’ve never been but have always wanted to know what it’s like to get out on the wind and waves, there are many great options available for beginners. Here are some ideas to inspire your next waterside vacation. START SMALL For those who dream of becoming a skipper one day, a great way to start is by sailing dinghies. These one-sail, beach- launch boats fit 1–2 people and can be rented at most water sports shops. If you want to make it a family experience, shops usually have 16-foot catamarans for rent as well. Catamarans have two

hulls rather than one, making for a smoother, more spacious ride.

However, if you are inexperienced or simply don’t want a local guide at the helm, signing up for a day trip with a skipper and crew is a great option. DO A FULL CHARTER Short of owning your own vessel, chartering a boat for multiple nights is the closest you can get to living out your nautical dreams. Some of the most

If you’ve never sailed before, inquire about lessons. Most rental operations have instructors on hand who can show you the ropes. The great thing about sailing is that whether you’re in a 12-foot dinghy or a 60-foot sloop, the same basic principles, rules, and skills apply.

beautiful destinations on earth — from the Caribbean Sea to the Mediterranean — are best experienced from the deck of a sailboat. Letting the sea guide you to amazing snorkeling destinations, remote cays, and bustling harbors is the

TAKE A DAY SAIL Many day-sail charters exist for those who want to go out a little farther than a dinghy would permit. If you’ve captained a boat and are familiar with the waters, you can apply for a bareboat charter.

stuff of real adventure.

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