CellCheck Newsletter December 2019 FINAL

December Edition 2019 ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

CellCheck NEWSLETTER

www.AnimalHealthIreland.ie

PROGRAMME NEWS | 03

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR | 12

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH | 14 RESEARCH UPDATE | 15

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27

AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of our stakeholders.

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41WN27

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie

CELLCHECK PROGRAMME

Programme news

Finola McCoy, Programme Manager

W elcome to the last CellCheck newsletter of 2019. The last few months have seen a lot of activity in relation to responsible antibiotic use, including CellCheck on-farm events, Dry Cow Consults and the recent ‘One Health-Awareness to Action Conference’ organised jointly by AHI, DAFM, FSAI, Teagasc and UCD. This is a topic that is firmly in the spotlight, and will continue to be, as we look at strategies in human, animal and environmental fields to reduce the risk of antimicrobial resistance. Our guest contributor this month is Stuart Childs, Teagasc Dairy Specialist. Stuart is reporting the experiences of the host farmers of this year’s CellCheck on-farm events, as they have embraced and implemented selective dry cow strategies in recent years. For those that did not make it to the events, or that did but would like a refresher of some of the messages, a short series of videos from the events is now available to watch online at click here Applications have now closed for the free Dry Cow Consults, delivered through the Targeted Advisory Service on Animal Health, funded by the Rural Development Programme and coordinated by Animal Health Ireland. Delivery of these consults is now underway by the trained veterinary practitioners; if you received notification of a successful application, don’t forget to arrange a consult with your nominated veterinary practitioner in advance of your drying off date! Preliminary findings from analysis of the Dry Cow Consults carried out in 2018 shows that as a result of the consult, the majority of participating farmers were open to the idea of selectively using antibiotic at drying off, while understanding the risks associated and feeling more empowered to manage those risks. This month’s research article looks at international experiences regarding selective use of antibiotic at drying off, specifically Dutch farmers’ attitudes towards the introduction of this practice. This month’s newsletter also features the annual CellCheck Milking For Quality awards event, held in Kilkenny last month. As always, this was a wonderful, positive occasion, celebrating outstanding performance-based on the 2018 bulk tank SCC data, all 500 winners had an annual average SCC of 76,500 cells/mL or less! This year, the two discussion group categories, Best Discussion Group and Most Improved Discussion Group were won by Bunratty and Western Duhallow Dairy Discussion Groups respectively. Congratulations to all! I would like to say a special word of thanks to our sponsors, FBD and Ornua for their continued support and finally a sincere thanks to the AHI team for organising a great event.

PAGE 3

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

CELLCHECK MILKING FOR QUALITY AWARDS WINNERS 2019

A selection of images of the overall winners from each of the Co-ops who were presented with their FBD holiday voucher. Presenting the voucher to each of the winners was Fiona Muldoon and Padraig Walshe of FBD and David Graham and Finola McCoy of Animal Health Ireland.

Kieran Kelly, Overall winner from Arrabawn Co-op

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 4

CELLCHECK MILKING FOR QUALITY AWARDS

Paul Cullinan of Aurivo Co-op receiving the FBD voucher on behalf of Gerard, Mel and Noel Brennan, Overall winners from Aurivo Co-op

Nigel Daunt, Overall winner from Bandon Co-op

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 5

CELLCHECK MILKING FOR QUALITY AWARDS

Jerry and Carmel Keohane, Overall winners from Barryroe Co-op

Eoin and Mary O’Riordan, Overall winners from Boherbue Co-op

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 6

CELLCHECK MILKING FOR QUALITY AWARDS

Sean Brogue, Overall winner from Callan Co-op

Gerry Murphy, Overall winner from Centenary Thurles Co-op

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 7

CELLCHECK MILKING FOR QUALITY AWARDS

Gerard Hennessy of Dairygold Co-op receiving the FBD voucher on behalf of Michael Kelleher, Overall winner from Dairygold Co-op

Lawrence Hallihane, Overall winner from Drinagh Co-op

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 8

CELLCHECK MILKING FOR QUALITY AWARDS

Peter Wall, Overall winner from Glanbia Ireland

Jeremiah and John O’Sullivan, Overall winners from Kerry Agri Business

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 9

CELLCHECK MILKING FOR QUALITY AWARDS

David Masterson and family, Overal winners from Lakeland Dairies

Leonard Leahy, Overall winner from Tipperary Co-op

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 10

CELLCHECK MILKING FOR QUALITY AWARDS

Bunratty Dairy Discussion Group, winners of the Best Discussion Group category being presented with their plaques from Fiona Muldoon and Padraig Walsh of FBD with Finola McCoy AHI, George Ramsbottom Teagasc, Kevin Downing ICBF (Judges)

Duhallow Discussion Group, winners of the Most Improved Discussion Group category being presented with their plaques from Fiona Muldoon and Padraig Walsh of FBD with Finola McCoy AHI, George Ramsbottom Teagasc, Kevin Downing ICBF (Judges)

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 11

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Cellcheck On Farm events October/November Stuart Childs, Dairy Specialist, Teagasc, Animal & Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Moorepark, Fermoy Co. Cork.

I In October and November, a series of 14 events took place on farms across the country to raise awareness in relation to prudent antibiotic use at drying off and its increasing importance into the future. For many years now most, but not all farms have treated all cows with antibiotic tubes, with or without teat sealer, at the end of lactation. However, due to changes in EU regulations that are due to be implemented by January 2022, a blanket approach such as this will no longer be permitted. The alternative is a selective dry-cow strategy, which involves administering internal teat sealant only to a selected proportion of suitable cows at drying off, with the remainder of the cows receiving both an antibiotic tube and an internal teat sealant. It will still be possible to administer antibiotics at drying off to individual cows that require them, provided we can demonstrate the need for treatment, for example with milk recording results. The events highlighted: • selection criteria that should be used to select cows suitable for teat seal only, • the hygiene levels required to make the practice a success, • ongoing research in the area, • reason for the change to the legislation i.e. the growing challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR).

It will still be possible to administer antibiotics to individual cows that require treatment to correct mastitis or SCC issues, however, to access treatment you will need proof of requirement in the form of milk recording data.

CELLCHECK ON-FARM EVENTS Teagasc |AnimalHealth Ireland Rule changes to antibiotic use on dairy farms is coming ARE YOU READY?

SELECTIVE DRY COW STRATEGY –THIS FARM’S EXPERIENCE

IRISH RESEARCH ON SELECTIVE DRY COW STRATEGIES

PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATIONS -HOWBESTTODRY OFFCOWS?

Ifyouwant to learn moreaboutanyof these topics, come along tooneof theAnimalHealth Ireland/Teagasc CellCheckOpenDays

ANTIBIOTICS– WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD?

APPLYING FOR A FREE ‘DRY COW CONSULT’

FOR INFORMATION: www.animalhealthireland.ie 071 96 71928

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME AnimalHealth Ireland,4-5TheArchways,Carrick-on-Shannon,Co.Leitrim,N41WN27

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 12

CELLCHECK ON FARM EVENTS

The host farms had all been practising a selective dry-cow strategy for the previous few years. Data collected relating to their drying off in 2018 and their performance to end of August in 2019 is presented in Table 1.

Min

Max 156 255 128 128

Average

Annual average SCC (2018) No. of cows dried in 2018 No. dried off with sealer only No. treated with antibiotic

64 59 13 14 16 55

111 129

60 72 42 96

% of Herd dried off with sealer only Annual average SCC (to end of Aug 2019) No. mastitis Cases (to end of Aug 2019)

86

137

2

25

9

Table 1. 2018 vs 2019 on SDCT host farm herds.

All host farmers highlighted hygiene during the drying off process as being the number one criterion for success with a selective dry-cow strategy. Good dry cowmanagement was also a key element in preventing new infections over the dry period, in the absence of antibiotic. This, coupled with good milk recording data which allowed for informed decisions, further contributed to their success with the procedure. All farms were planning to implement a selective dry-cow strategy again this autumn, if appropriate. A selective dry-cow strategy is not without risk, hence the importance of discussing and planning your dry-cow treatment strategy with your veterinary practitioner.

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 13

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH

Good housing means happy, healthy cows!

[Click here] for previously published tips

M astitis occurs because bacteria get into the udder through the teat end. Bacteria such as E. coli and Strep. uberis , which survive in the cow’s environment, can cause severe cases of mastitis. When cows are housed, their exposure to these bacteria can be higher. We often blame the calving environment if we experience cases of mastitis in early lactation, however research tells us that in many cases these infections are acquired not just around the time of calving, but even earlier during the dry period. With the change in weather and as we approach the dry period, cows in many parts of the country are being housed now. Remember that the housing conditions for these dry cows and in-calf heifers can influence the incidence of newmastitis infections next spring.

Reduce the risk of mastitis by making sure housing is CLEAN, DRY and COMFORTABLE TIP

1. CLEANER houses = cleaner udders = less bacteria at the teat ends. • Scrape passageways, cubicles and yards at least twice a day, or run automatic scrapers at least 6 – 8 times daily. • Don’t forget, cubicle mats and bedding should be clean! • In straw-bedded houses, bedding should be refreshed daily.

2. DRY housing makes it harder for bacteria to grow. • Good ventilation is essential.

• Liming of cubicles (twice daily) will help keep them dry. • Make sure straw bedding isn’t damp. Wet knees after kneeling on it means it’s damp! 3. COMFORTABLE cubicles=cows will use them more=cleaner udders and teats. • Don’t overstock cubicle housing this winter-aim to have 10% more cubicles than cows.

For more information, see CellCheck Farm Guidelines 1 & 16, and Management Note L

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 14

RESEARCH UPDATE

Farmers’ attitude toward the introduction of selective dry cow therapy J. Dairy Sci. 99:8259–8266 | http://dx.doi.org/10.3168/jds.2016-11349 | © American Dairy Science Association®, 2016.

C. G. M. Scherpenzeel,* 1 S. H. W. Tijs,* I. E. M. den Uijl,* I. M. G. A. Santman-Berends,* A. G. J. Velthuis,*and T. J. G. M. Lam*†

*GD Animal Health, PO Box 9, 7400 AA Deventer, the Netherlands †Utrecht University, Department Farm Animal Health, PO Box 80151, 3508 TD Utrecht, the Netherlands

ABSTRACT The attitude of Dutch dairy farmers toward selective dry cow treatment (SDCT) is unknown, although a favorable mindset toward application of SDCT seems crucial for successful implementation. Given the fact that blanket dry cow treatment has been strongly promoted until recently, the implementation of SDCT was expected to be quite a challenge. This study aimed to provide insight into the level of implementation of SDCT in 2013 in the Netherlands, the methods used by farmers for selection of cows for dry cow treatment (DCT), the relation between SDCT and udder health and antimicrobial usage (AMU) in 2013, and the mindset of farmers toward SDCT. In 2014, a questionnaire was conducted in a group of 177 herds included in a large-scale udder health study in 2013 and for which all clinical mastitis cases during this year were recorded. In addition, data on somatic cell count (SCC) parameters and AMU was available for these herds. The questionnaire included questions with regard to DCT with a special emphasis on farmers’ attitude and mindset with regard to applying DCT in 2013. The data that were obtained from the questionnaire were combined with the data on clinical mastitis, SCC, and AMU. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the data and to study the association between DCT, udder health, and AMU. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models with a logit link function were applied to evaluate potential associations between DCT and farmers’ mindset. Selective DCT was taken up progressively by the farmers in our study, with 75% of them implementing SDCT in 2013. The main criterion used to select cows for DCT was the SCC history during the complete previous lactation. The herds were divided into 3 groups based on the percentage of cows dried off with antibiotics in 2013 as indicated by the farmers during interviews. The first group applied BDCT, and the herds for which SDCT was applied were split in 2 equally sized groups based on the median percentage of cows dried off with antibiotics (67%). The incidence rate of subclinical and clinical mastitis were comparable between the groups. Results of the multivariable model showed that 4 factors related to farmers’ mindset were associated with the probability to apply SDCT: “financial consequences of SDCT,” “uncertainty whether a cow will recover without antimicrobials,” the statement “I do not have a problem with the (potential) negative consequences of SDCT,” and the usage of internal teat sealants. Application of SDCT appeared to be associated with farmers’ attitude. The mindset of farmers with respect to reduction of AMU and the implementation of SDCT was generally positive.

KEY WORDS: antimicrobials, udder health, selective dry cow therapy, attitude

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 15

CELLCHECK REGIONAL COORDINATORS

A Resource and Point of Contact for CellCheck Activities in your Area

6

1

Tom Starr 087 6697010

Enda Faulkner 087 7057631 enda.faulkner@aurivo.ie Mayo/Sligo/Donegal Aurivo

tstarr@arrabawn.ie Tipperary/Limerick National Co-op

7

2

1

4

John Fitzpatrick 086 0426567

John Murphy 066 7163200 john.murphy@kerry.ie Kerry/Clare Kerry Agribusiness

fitzpatrickj@glanbia.ie Kilkenny/Laois/Carlow/ Kildare/Dublin Glanbia

7

3

8

6

8

5

Aoife Feeney afeeney@carbery.com 087 3484901. West Cork Carbery Group

9

Andrew O’Neill 086 1836505 aoneill@tipperary-coop.ie Tipperary Tipperary Co-Op

2

3

4

9

5

Tom Downes 087 2564669

Denis Guiry 086 8098639 dguiry@dairygold.ie Cork/Tipperary/Limerick Dairygold

downest@lakeland.ie Longford/Monaghan Lakeland Dairies

Brendan Dillon 087 2626851 BrDillon@glanbia.ie

Cork/Waterford/ Wexford/Wicklow Glanbia

CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER | December Edition 2019

PAGE 16

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16

Made with FlippingBook Ebook Creator