Aberdeen Smiles December 2018

Hours: M–F 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID BOISE, ID PERMIT 411

1409 6th Ave. SE #8 Aberdeen, SD 57401 605-225-2236 www.AberdeenSmiles.com

Aleaha Fettig, DDS Valerie Drake, DDS

Inside This Issue Get to Know Melissa Page 1 What Do My Symptoms Mean? Page 2 Hear From Our Happy Patients! Page 2 The Tooth Fairy Goes International Page 3 30-Minute Cauliflower Soup Page 3 What Your Eyes Can Tell You About Love Page 4

In the last decade, researchers have determined that from a romantic and reproductive standpoint, both men and women are attracted to partners with What Your Eyes Can Tell You About Love

IS LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT REAL?

The idea of love at first sight is wonderfully romantic. Two strangers see each other across a crowded room. There’s an instant, magnetic attraction, and suddenly they’ve found their match for all of eternity. In a world in which dating often requires a lot of work — work that comes with disappointment, rejection, and

bigger pupils. Studies demonstrate that when women are at their peak fertility, they might subconsciously be more attracted to a person with sizable pupils because it could indicate a partner’s attraction to them. Likewise, researchers have reported that men seek out women with dilated pupils due to the association of larger pupils with youth and longevity. The connection between the eyes and enthrallment has inspired some of Shakespeare’s most iconic sonnets, and the science behind our eyes validates some of the Bard’s romantic claims. But does this connection between larger pupils and attraction corroborate the idea of love at first sight? If you believe that attraction equates to true love, then absolutely. But if your definition of love requires a little more depth, then you may have to toss aside the idea of love at first sight and instead view your partner’s eyes as mere “windows” to their soul.

uncertainty — falling in love at first sight has a strong appeal. But can it actually happen? Can your eyes tell you anything about love? The connection between the eyes and love has been described in poetry and prose since time immemorial — it’s the stuff of heroic epics and fanciful fairy tales. And evidence has increasingly shown that the human brain is hard-wired to both display and notice visual cues when gazing at a potential love interest. Enlarged pupils are one such cue. When you survey a person or object you are interested in, your brain releases a surge of dopamine — a chemical that controls the brain’s reward and pleasure centers — which causes your pupils to dilate. In this sense, beauty really is “in the eye of the beholder.”

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