2019 February POINT!

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A publication of the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber | www.okcchamber.com

STANDING PROUDLY WITH THOSE WHO REFUSE TO STAND STILL.

February 2019

www.okcchamber.com

THE VOICE OF BUS I NESS

The Chamber recently released its 2019 legislative priorities, the playbook for its advocacy efforts during the upcoming legislative session.

CLICK FOR ENTIRE STORY

IN THIS ISSUE:

08| Chamber resources headed your way

14| Progress still needed on justice reform, CJAC executive director says 12| Economic growth projected to continue, report finds

Chamber releases 2019 legislative agenda

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T he Chamber recently released its comprehensive set of public policy priorities that are crucial to creating a strong future for Oklahoma businesses. Below is an excerpt of the key priorities. Read the full list at OKCChamber.com/legislative. County Government Reform The Chamber supports legislation and/or an Initiative Petition to empower Oklahoma counties to alter their form of governance to meet their unique needs. Workers’ Comp Reform The Chamber supports defending and improving the comprehensive workers’ compensation reform legislation passed by the legislature and signed by the governor during the 2013 session. Economic Development Programs The Chamber supports retaining the state’s premier economic/community development programs which are critical in attracting new businesses to the state, assisting existing companies expand and encouraging investment in communities across the state. Following are the key programs the Chamber will work to protect:

• Quality Jobs Act, 21st Century QJA, Small Employer QJA and the Prime Contractor QJA • Aerospace Engineer Tax Credit • Investment/New Jobs Tax Credit • Historical Building Rehabilitation Tax Credit • Freeport (Inventory) Exemption • Five-year ad valorem abatement and sales tax exemption for manufacturing facilities • Oklahoma Regional Home Office Insurance Premium Tax Credit The Chamber will also pursue legislation to enact or modify an incentive to address the statewide shortage of software engineers and work to protect the Energy Efficient Homes Tax Credit. Gun Legislation The Chamber is fully supportive of the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the responsible expansion of gunowner’s rights in Oklahoma. However, the Chamber will oppose legislation that would allow open/concealed carry of guns into high- economic impact events, including horse shows, the

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Oklahoma State Fair, Olympic-qualifying events on the Oklahoma River, high school basketball and wrestling tournaments at the State Fairgrounds and NCAA and Big XII sporting events (including the Women’s College World Series, college baseball at Bricktown Ballpark and NCAA and Big XII basketball tournaments). The Chamber will also oppose legislation that would allow guns to be carried on college campuses, limit a business owner’s rights to prohibit weapons or allow guns to be carried by individuals who haven’t been tested/ trained and do not have a permit. The Chamber will lead and support the efforts of the Oklahomans for Business and Property Owners’ Rights coalition to defend against harmful gun legislation. Criminal Justice/Sentencing Reform The Chamber supports legislation and funding for sentencing reforms and rehabilitation programs to ease the financial drain on Oklahoma’s criminal justice system, lessen the burden on jails and prisons throughout the state and allow non-violent offenders to enter the workforce more quickly. The Chamber supports the efforts of the Criminal Justice Reclassification Council created pursuant to HB 1098 (2018) and the Task Force on Fines Fees and Costs created pursuant to SB 342 (2017) to review and recommend changes to the Oklahoma criminal code to reduce the state’s prison population. The Chamber supports the Oklahomans for Criminal Justice Reform Policy Agenda to: 1) continue smart sentencing reform; 2) improve bail and jail practices; 3)

improve fairness in the pretrial and jury trial process; 4) improve family connections for incarcerated Oklahomans; 5) make reentry and supervision improvements that reduce fines and fees, enhance workforce opportunities and increase public safety; 6) secure treatment funding; 7) better inform future policymaking and oversight; and 8) improve collection and release of data related to courts, jails, policing and prisons. The Chamber supports legislation to increase the fines/ penalties for the possession and/or use of credit card skimming devices. Oklahoma County Criminal Justice Reform Advisory Council The Chamber supports the work of the Oklahoma County Criminal Justice Reform Advisory Council, an inter-local government council, designed to institutionalize cooperation and planning for the criminal justice system in Oklahoma County. Medical Marijuana The Chamber supports legislation to protect an employer’s right to maintain a drug-free workplace and to enforce policies to prohibit employee impairment during work hours. Early Childhood Education The Chamber steadfastly supports early childhood education and full funding of pre-K and kindergarten programs. Targeted spending on our youngest children is simply a smart investment. The Chamber supports legislative initiatives to maintain early childhood education programs and initiatives.

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Long-Term, Strategic Education Funding The Chamber supports development of a long-term, strategic plan that will enable improvement in classroom teaching and academic performance. We encourage development of detailed legislation that will address the teacher shortage by rewarding teacher performance and experience or incentivizes teachers to work in high priority areas. Teacher Preparation, Recruitment and Retention Oklahoma and the nation have a teacher shortage. Oklahoma’s teacher preparation system needs to be improved in order to train, attract and retain high-quality teachers. We support the review/revision of policies/ laws to improve the recruitment and retention of high- quality teachers. This includes support of other alternative pathways, such as Teach for America, that enhance the diversity and skill sets in the teaching profession. Health Insurance Coverage for Oklahomans The Chamber supports extending health insurance coverage to more Oklahoma residents through pursuit of all available funds to cover the costs of uncompensated care that are currently shifted to employers and health care providers. The Chamber further supports broadening Insure Oklahoma to provide health insurance coverage to more of the state’s uninsured. Major Transportation Projects The Chamber will advocate for full funding and timely completion of work on major interchanges

located at I-44/Broadway Extension and I-240/I-35 (Crossroads), as well as the following major projects: I-40 corridor east of I-35 (Tinker Air Force Base) including expansion of I-40 facility to six lanes; necessary improvements to State Highway 74 (north of Lake Hefner Parkway); and future development of I-44 corridor to provide for future mobility needs due to commercial expansion. ODOT Eight-Year Plan The Chamber supports providing adequate annual dedicated funding necessary to preserve and implement ODOT’s eight-year construction work plan. Furthermore, the Chamber will strongly oppose any effort to divert dedicated transportation funding to other areas of government. State Bridge Improvement Plan The Chamber supports providing adequate annual Improvement Plan to repair or replace all of Oklahoma’s structurally deficient bridges on the state’s highway system by 2020 and further ensure that ODOT is able to maintain a nationally leading bridge improvement program. dedicated funding to implement the Oklahoma Department of Transportation’s (ODOT) Bridge

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Chamber resources headed your way

T he Chamber’s annual membership mailing will arrive in your mailbox later this month. This resources packet, which is exclusive to Chamber members, includes the 2019 Public Policy Guide, the 2018 Annual Report, a 2019 membership plaque sticker or insert and an envelope of coupons and discounts from Chamber members. The Public Policy Guide includes the Chamber’s 2019 legislative agenda, information about the Greater OKC Chamber Political Action Committee, the 2018 RIED and OKC scores, and contact information for federal, state and local elected officials. Also included is

the 2018 Annual Report, which recaps the Chamber’s accomplishments from last year. The annual membership mailing will also include a flyer with more information about the Chamber’s Greater Choice Oklahoma health care plan, which is available to members with two to 50 employees. The coupons will allow Chamber members to enjoy valuable gifts from several Greater Oklahoma City Chamber member companies in 2019, including American Banjo Museum, Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, Oklahoma State Fair, Inc., RIVERSPORT Adventure Parks and YMCA of Greater Oklahoma City.

Leadership Notes

The heart of our community L ast month I received a letter from a family who had recently visited Oklahoma City from Arizona. The Magdaleno family was traveling on I-44 at 3:30 a.m. when their horse trailer disconnected from their truck, causing a major accident. Thankfully, no one was injured and Oklahoma City residents were able to do what they do best: take care of people. The letter from the Magdaleno family described the compassion and care they felt from the first responders, including the Rescue Ladder 14 team. They told me about how staff from the National Reining Horse Association brought veterinarians to the scene to care for their horses and how a business owner located a horse trailer that allowed the Magdalenos to safely transport their horses back to Arizona. The Magdalenos closed their letter thanking our community for its generosity and goodwill, and I want to echo their gratitude. Whether you call it loving your neighbor or the Oklahoma Standard, our community shines brightest when we show compassion for other people. Kindness is at the heart of our community and I hope we will continue to keep that tradition moving forward.

Roy H. Williams, CCE President & CEO

READ ROY’S VELOCITYOKC STORY OF THE MONTH

Sincerely,

“Take a quick peek inside the AICCM” VELOCITYOKC.COM/ ROYSPICK

Roy H. Williams, CCE Chamber CEO & President

9

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Feb. 12 Member Orientation Time: 8:30 to 10 a.m. Location: Chamber offices, 123 Park Ave. okcchamber.com/orientation Feb. 13 MegaLunch Time: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Location: Oklahoma Credit Union Association, 631 E Hill St. okcchamber.com/megalunch Feb. 20 Chamber Forum Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Location: Vast, 333 W Sheridan Ave. okcchamber.com/pathway Feb. 21 Ambassador Meeting Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Location: Main Event Entertainment, 1441 W. Memorial Road okcchamber.com/ambassador March 7 Chairman’s Breakfast Time: 8 to 9:30 a.m. Location: Cox Convention Center, 1 Myriad Gardens okcchamber.com/stitt March 12 Member Orientation Time: 3:30 to 5 p.m. Location: Chamber offices, 123 Park Ave. okcchamber.com/orientation2 March 20 Chamber Forum Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Location: Vast, 333 W Sheridan Ave. okcchamber.com/forum

New event offers networking, resources for small businesses To help you strengthen your business, the Chamber is launching a new event on the first Friday of the month starting in March.Enlighten, a lunch-and-learn event part of the Business University suite of programming, will provide small business networking and education resources exclusively to Chamber member businesses. Event topics will offer easily applicable and timely tips for small business owners and managers, including ways to finance a business expansion, things to consider before filing your taxes, marketing your small business and more. In March, attendees will learn how to build an effective employee benefits program. The event will be held at Walker Terrace, 1300 N Walker Ave., on March 1 from noon to 1 p.m. A $25 ticket includes a boxed lunch. Seating is very limited, so register at OKCChamber.com/events to ensure you have a seat. Special thanks to Signature Sponsor MassMutual Oklahoma.

Register for events online and view a complete event calendar at okcchamber.com/events.

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Save your spot for D.C. Visit on May 1-2 Decisions made in our nation’s capital have a significant impact on our businesses and our community. From regulation and infrastructure development to investments in our nation’s defense, Oklahoma City – and our companies – feel the consequences of choices made there. Join the Chamber and local leaders on a two-day trip to Washington, D.C., May 1-2, to advocate for pro- business legislation in the nation’s capital. The annual event includes personal briefings with Oklahoma’s U.S. senators and congressmen and a reception on Capitol Hill with federal officials and defense leaders. On the second day, sessions will cover specific topics of interest on issues critical to our community. Cost is $800 per person and includes one night’s lodging at The Intercontinental Washington D.C. - The Wharf, 801 Wharf Street NW, and all affiliated events. Visit OKCChamber.com/dc to reserve your spot. Special thanks to Signature Sponsor American Fidelity Assurance Company.

Gov. Kevin Stitt to speak at his first Chairman’s Breakfast Gov. Kevin Stitt will speak to guests at the upcoming Chairman’s Breakfast on Thursday, March 7, from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Cox Convention Center, 1 Myriad Gardens. Gov. Stitt will outline the major objectives for his first year in office and discuss key objectives that will impact businesses. Tickets are $40 for Chamber members and $60 for nonmembers. Tables of 10 are available for $750. Register for the event online at www.okcchamber.com/stitt. Special thanks to Signature Sponsor Cox Communications and Host Sponsor Renaissance Oklahoma City Convention Center Hotel & Spa. THE POINT - FEBRUARY 2019 11

Economic growth projected to continue, report finds

A ccording to the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber’s 2019 Economic Forecast, the Oklahoma City metro economy is expected to continue its growth after a healthy year in 2018. Positive Oklahoma City metro job growth in 2019 is expected to increase by 2.1 percent or 13,600 jobs. However, a modest slowdown in activity could be forthcoming and the state and local economies are vulnerable to national uncertainties. If national conditions weaken in the second half of 2019, this could result in a noticeable drag on local and state forecasted growth. Strong economic conditions at both the national and state levels helped to bring about a second consecutive year of positive job growth in the metro in 2018. Overall nonfarm annual job growth was 2.5 percent or 15,900 jobs in the Oklahoma City MSA. The largest percentage year-over-year job gains were found in the Oil & Gas (+12.7 percent), Administrative Support (+8.6 percent), Leisure Services (+5.0 percent), Wholesale Trade (+4.2 percent), Manufacturing (+3.3 percent) and Professional & Business Services (+2.8 percent) sectors.

The Oklahoma City metro ended 2018 with an annual average unemployment rate for the year just above three percent (3.3 percent), with monthly unemployment rates ranging as low as 2.6 percent and as high 3.8 percent. Oklahoma City finished out the year ranked among the lowest ten unemployment rates for large metros (over 1 million population). November 2018 brought about the lowest monthly unemployment rate (2.6 percent) the Oklahoma City metro had experienced in nearly eighteen years. As a contrast, it is important to see how area population growth helps to offset low unemployment and increase total labor force. Population continues to be an impressive story for Oklahoma City. When official 2018 U.S. Census population figures are released, it will show that the Oklahoma City metro population has now grown to be 1.4 million. By 2020, the metro is expected to have added nearly 200,000 people over the past decade. Since 2005, the Oklahoma City metro has averaged a 1.5 percent annual growth rate, nearly double that of the nation. If the region is able to sustain that growth rate, it will reach 2 million in population by the year 2040.

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Following national trends, urbanization continues to benefit the two largest metros in the state. This is specifically seen in looking at how much of the state’s economy and growth can be attributed to the Oklahoma City and Tulsa metros. Combined, Oklahoma City and Tulsa MSAs now account for 70 percent of the state’s GDP, 66 percent of personal income, and 60 percent of total population (or $7 out of every $10 of goods & services, two out of every three dollars of personal income and three out of every five people). Job Growth from Chamber-Assisted Companies 2018 brought about the third year of a five-year economic development program called Forward Oklahoma City V. This is the fifth iteration of the Forward campaign that has provided longer- term strategic planning to the region’s economic development initiatives over the past twenty years. Since 2017, 15,390 jobs with payroll in excess of $700 million and $958 million in capital investment has been announced by Chamber-assisted companies. As part of that program, overall metrics are tracked for

Chamber-assisted companies in a number of different areas: new start-up companies assisted, job growth from existing companies as well as new-to-market firms, wages, capital investment and growth in the tax base. In 2018, Chamber-assisted companies announced plans for the creation of 7,380 jobs with an annual average salary of $47,086. In addition, those same companies announced more than $496 million in capital investment. The Greater Oklahoma City Chamber ended 2018 with 74 active projects in its economic development pipeline. The pipeline tracks companies or projects that are potentially looking to relocate or expand in the Greater Oklahoma City region. The largest number of projects by facility type included Manufacturing, Distribution, Office/Shared-Services, and Aviation. The 2019 Economic Forecast will be released on Feb. 14. Read the publication at that time at OKCChamber.com/forecast.

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Progress still needed on justice reform, CJAC executive director says

A lthough the United States continues to lead the world in the number of citizens under the authority of the criminal justice system, 2018 witnessed champions of justice reform across the county achieve victories in their relentless quest to successfully chip away at the injustice in America’s criminal justice system. In Oklahoma, a report co-published by Oklahomans for Criminal Justice Reform and FWD.us shows the number of people entering Oklahoma prisons in 2018 grew 11 percent after a slight decline between 2016 and 2017. The bipartisan political organization that advocates for immigration and justice reform notes the influx of 10,777 prisoners admitted in 2018 by state corrections officials was “the highest single-year total of all time.” “Although we’ve made much progress, there is still much work to be done in Oklahoma,” said Timothy Tardibono, executive director of the Oklahoma County Criminal Justice Advisory Council. “Whether it be the types and numbers of people being sent to prison, or the conditions the prison population experiences at the Oklahoma County Jail, the progress we see is steady but

still slow. We know what the issues are, it’s time now to move forward and resolve them.” Oklahoma County is the only county in the state without a county sales tax dedicated to funding its jail and daily criminal justice system. The two recently elected county commissioners say improvements at the county jail will be their top priorities. District 1 Commissioner Carrie Blumert and District 3 Commissioner Kevin Calvey both campaigned on the need to end overcrowding and improve conditions at the Oklahoma County jail. Both commissioners called jail conditions, and criminal justice more broadly, one of the most urgent issues facing the county. Although both agree that a new facility is likely the best solution in the long term, the two commissioners said they hoped to pursue other ideas to improve conditions in the near term, including using MAPS 4 funds for something related to the jail or a holistic treatment center near the jail and exploring whether it makes sense to jail people accused of nonviolent offenses. Tardibono says that nothing should be ruled out. “We are looking at a wide range of reforms,” he said.

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“Those reforms include the pretrial release process, governance, costs, fines and fees, booking and releasing low-level offenders or citing them and release like most municipalities do, and expediting the diversion determination before they are booked into the jail.” Despite the statewide increase in prison populations, Tardibono says there are ongoing improvements in safely reducing the jail population in Oklahoma County. “In fact, we are starting to see the jail population reduced to numbers we haven’t seen in over a decade,” he noted. “That is good news for improving public safety while also decreasing costs to the taxpayer. Yet even with this progress, we still have a jail that is overcrowded and difficult for staff to provide needed services.” Tardibono says that the next steps are to continue to improve the justice system while the community imagines what a future facility looks like. “Previous discussions in our county have always been about building a bigger facility,” he said. “The current conversation is exploring whether it’s smarter to build smaller with the concept of a justice center that facilitates more options than we have in the current jail. Some of these other options could include ideas like

quicker booking and release, on-site connection to local providers, a facility housing minimum and/or medium level offenders in appropriate settings and a hub for case monitoring and accountability. Those are the options other cities and counties are building into their new or renovated facilities and those are the solutions we need here to increase public safety and to interrupt the addiction cycle some of our neighbors are trapped in.” Tardibono also hopes that the overdue justice reinvestment funding could be allocated in the upcoming legislative session. “That funding will provide much-needed services in Oklahoma County for addiction treatment and recovery. We are making progress and the big challenge is how to keep the momentum moving in the right direction.” Read the original article and the most recent Oklahoma County Criminal Justice Advisory Council report at VeloCityOKC.com/justice.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ABOUT JUSTICE REFORM EFFORTS THROUGHOUT OKLAHOMA AT VELOCITYOKC.COM.

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Feature on GreaterOklahomaCity.com highlights OKC foodie scene

O KC’s renaissance has been fertile turf for ambition; one result is redefining the restaurant arena. Oklahoma City isn’t a fly- over city — it’s a food destination. The Chamber’s newest feature story on GreaterOklahomaCity.com is helping tell that story as it chronicles Oklahoma City’s development as a cuisine capital. “Food City,” which can be read at GreaterOklahomaCity.com/yum, details what diners can expect when feasting on all that Oklahoma City restauranteurs have to offer, starting with a tour of Oklahoma City’s districts. From one of Oklahoma City’s first food districts, the Historic Farmers Public Market founded in 1928, all the way to the newer redevelopments of the Plaza, Paseo and Uptown districts,

each area’s distinctive flavor is highlighted. The feature story also dives into the influence that global cuisine traditions have had on the Oklahoma City food scene. “Food City” is one of three featured stories on GreaterOklahomaCity.com with the goal of capturing the region’s ongoing renaissance. “A River’s Rise” chronicles the redevelopment of the Oklahoma River and “Brilliant: Soaring Science from a Rising Bio Campus” shows how companies in Oklahoma City are pushing the boundaries in the world of biotech. All three stories, which are housed under the resources section of GreaterOklahomaCity.com, have a goal of sharing Greater Oklahoma City’s story with a broader audience.

READ ALL OF THE FEATURE STORIES ON GREATEROKLAHOMACITY.COM

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Learn how the Pathway Project will change our schools

C urrently, the Oklahoma City Public School district’s facilities are operating at about 60 percent of capacity and the district faces $11 million in reduced state funding over the next two years based on projected enrollment declines. With those realities in mind, the district is undertaking an important reenvisioning of its future with their Pathway to Greatness Project. The Project is the district’s next step in aligning its resources to provide equitable learning opportunities for all students. After a thorough assessment of the district’s facilities, a detailed demographic study, input from staff and stakeholders, and multiple community meetings, the district now has three potential solutions that will help invest more in each individual student. At the February

Chamber Forum, attendees will hear about the proposed paths, all of which include increased access to learning opportunities, better support for teachers, added social support for students, and more resources for students. Individual tickets for this event, which is on Feb. 20 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Vast, are $35 for Chamber members and $55 for nonmembers. Half-season series ticket packages are also still available. Reserve your seat to five luncheons for $150. Learn more at OKCChamber.com/pathway. Special thanks to Series Signature Sponsor Cox Business and Series Corporate Sponsor ADG, PC.

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Exhibit at the Chamber’s first State of Health Event

T he Greater Oklahoma City Chamber is launching a new event in 2019, and its members have a chance to be a part of it. e State of Health event, scheduled for May 13 at the Cox Convention Center, 1 Myriad Gardens, will highlight the successes and opportunities surrounding the health care landscape across the Greater Oklahoma City region. Public, private and nonprofit leaders will also discuss community wellness initiatives, health care industries and opportunities for growth. For $300, Chamber members can exhibit at the event and connect with more than 500 corporate, city and state leaders who are interested in the region’s health care industry. Corporate and small business sponsorship opportunities are still available for $3,000 and $300, respectively. The small business sponsorship is limited to Chamber member companies with fewer athan 50 employees. Contact Meredith Manley, senior event manager, at mmanley@okcchamber.com or 405-297-8964 to reserve your booth space or to sponsor the event. Special thanks to Signature Sponsor BKD CPAs & Advisors and Host Sponsor CIGNA HealthCare.

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Speak up for businesses this legislative session D uring the 2019 legislative session, the Chamber will actively lobby on behalf of the business community to improve economic development and quality of life in Greater Oklahoma City––but the Chamber can’t act on its own. The Chamber also relies on its members to engage with legislators and help move the agenda of Oklahoma City’s growth forward.

Ways to speak up for your business:

• Contact your elected officials and leaders at the state Capitol by phone, email, letter or an in- person visit. You can find contact information for all elected officials in the 2019 Public Policy Guide at OKCChamber.com/ppg. • Stay informed on the issues. Visit OKCBusinessAdvocate.com to learn more about issues that will impact Oklahoma City businesses and sign up for “The Business Advocate” newsletter at that link. • Connect with the community. The Chamber’s events throughout the year are the perfect way to stay informed on the issues facing Oklahoma City while meeting legislators and other business leaders. For more information about the Chamber’s advocacy efforts or the Business Advocacy Center, contact Derek

In order to help you fully maximize your impact on the political process, the Chamber’s advocacy website, OKCBusinessAdvocate.com, allows you to easily identify your elected officials and the most effective ways to communicate with them. The site also contains the Chamber’s public policy priorities and updates on the progress of the Chamber’s lobbying efforts at the Capitol. Throughout the legislative session, Chamber members can opt to receive “The Business Advocate” – an email newsletter featuring timely updates on the status of priority legislative issues. The Chamber also encourages business leaders to act as a grassroots advocate for issues that are important to the economic stability of the region.

Sparks, government relations manager, at dsparks@okcchamber.com or 297-8933.

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ECONOMIC INDICATORS

Oklahoma City Metro Among Top 20 Most Economically Diverse in Nation

Distributive Services Knowledge- Intensive Business Services

Oklahoma City MSA

15.4%

10.5%

10.1%

10.3%

6.9%

14.2%

32.6%

Capital-Intensive Manufacturing Finance, Insurance &Real Estate Healthcare Government Other

Typical US Metro

18.4%

13.7%

11.7%

11.2%

10.5%

7.2%

27.4%

0%

10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

% of Jobs in Industry

Source: Emsi. 2018.4. A rank of 1 is most favorable.

For comprehensive Economic Indicators and Regional Data, please visit your Greater Oklahoma City Chamber Economic Development Division at greateroklahomacity.com/economicindicators or contact Eric Long, Research Economist – 405-297-8976; elong@okcchamber.com • Primary job labor or “functional labor” is defined as employment in industries whose primary market is not their local one or are export-based industries. • The Oklahoma City Metro area is the 18th most economically diverse metro area of 382 metros in the United States according to the Emsi industry diversity index. • Even job distribution across industry clusters provides economic stability for a region. Diversity protects communities from the risks associated with dependency on any one industry’s performance.

Give your bottom line the boost it’s been looking for. We have resources, rebates and energy efficient upgrades to help you lower your energy costs and reduce your usage. Learn more at oge.com/business . LOWER COSTS, LARGER PROFITS.

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GRAND OPENINGS Ribbon-cutting ceremonies are a great member benefit. To view more photos, see the schedule of upcoming Grand Openings or subscribe to the Grand Openings calendar, visit www.okcchamber.com/grandopenings.

Redbud Dental of Edmond 18001 N. Western Ave., Suite 106 Edmond, OK 73012

First United Bank – Downtown 512 N. Broadway Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73102

CBD Plus USA 10932 N.W. Expressway Yukon, OK 73099

Chicago Title Oklahoma 3600 NW 138th St. Oklahoma City, OK 73134

Mazaheri Law Firm, PLLC 3000 W. Memorial Road, Suite 230 Oklahoma City, OK 73120

CBD Plus USA 6511 N. May Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73116

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WELCOME NEW MEMBERS

COR E Charli Bullard Real Estate, RE/MAX Preferred Real Estate Ms. Charli Bullard................. 414-6215 9520 N. May Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73120 www.charlibullard.com A S SOC I A T E Conco Construction Contractors - General Mr. Kyle Blasdel............(316) 943-7111 3051 N. Ohio St. Wichita, KS 67219-4132 www.concoconstruction.com COR E Directors Life Assurance Insurance Ms. Linda M. Sargent............ 842-1234 9020 N. May Ave., Suite 120 Oklahoma City, OK 73120-4495 www.directorslife.tv P A R T N E R + DuraCoatings Holdings, LLC Coatings - Protective Manufacturers Mr. Jay Hudson...................... 692-2249 13920 S. Meridian Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73173 www.dciind.com E X E CU T I V E P A R T N E R + + + Express Employment Professionals Employment Agencies Mr. Bob Funk, Jr..................... 272-9000

COR E Gulf Coast Commercial, Inc. Contractors - General Mr. Mark Stroud.................... 802-7862

COR E Pro Tech Mechanical, Inc.

ADV I SOR AC Owen Construction Construction Companies Mr. Aaron Owen..................... 285-9333 1376 Fretz Drive Edmond, OK 73003-5713 www.ac-owen.com COR E AGI Consulting, LLC Consultants Ms. R. Robyn Assaf, J.D......... 525-0777 4312 N. Classen Blvd.

Air Conditioning & Heating - Commercial Ms. Brea Hatch..................... 285-0215 13408 Railway Drive Oklahoma City, OK 73114-2272 www.ptmech.com COR E Radisson Hotel Hotels & Motels Ms. Pat Mayandie................. 601-0062 4716 W. I-40 Service Road Oklahoma City, OK 73128 www.radisson.com/oklahoma-city-airport A S SOC I A T E VOX Audio Visual Audio-Visual Equipment & Supplies Mr. Jeff M. Bezdek................. 231-1912 1015 N. Broadway Ave., Suite 120 Oklahoma City, OK 73102-5849 www.voxaudiovisual.com COR E Vox Audio Visual Elite Services Audio-Visual Equipment & Supplies Mr. Matt Kuykendall.............. 802-4121 1015 N. Broadway Ave.

14711 Bristol Park Blvd. Edmond, OK 73013-1894

P A R T N E R + Heartland Payment Systems Financial Industry Technology Services Mr. Lance Haffner.................. 531-3050 3932 S. Boulevard Edmond, OK 73013-5775 www.heartland.us Ittybam Computer Software Developers Mr. Daniel France.........(702) 582-8497 1141 W. Sheridan Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73106-7848 www.ittybam.com ADV I SOR Latham Consulting Group Consultants Mr. Matt Latham................... 826-8114 COR E Pendergrass Promos, Inc. Advertising - Specialties Mr. Kevin Pendergrass..(888) 354-3554 1530 N. Harrison St., Suite 261 Shawnee, OK 74804 www.pendergrasspromos.com ADV I SOR Price Lang Consulting Public Relations Ms. Emily Lang...................... 417-4036 2000 E. 15th St., Building 300 COR E 1138 NW 34th St., Suite 4 Oklahoma City, OK 73118 www.lathamconsulting.group

Oklahoma City, OK 73118 www.agiconsultingllc.com

COR E Audi Oklahoma City Automobile Dealers Ms. Kimberly Jackson............ 605-1282

1300 N. Broadway Extension Oklahoma City, OK 73114 www.audioklahomacity.com

COR E Behavioral Innovations Mental Health Services Dr. Crystal Hernandez...(855) 782-7822 14828 Serenita Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73134 www.behavioral-innovations.com COR E Bolt Venture Capital, LLC Investments Mr. Sam Rainbolt................... 659-8512 1900 NW Expressway, Suite 550 Oklahoma City, OK 73118 COR E CBD Plus USA - Surrey Hills Health Services Ms. Erin Galbraith........(833) 422-3758 10932 N.W. Expressway, Suite A Yukon, OK 73099 www.cbdplususa.com

Oklahoma City, OK 73102 www.voxaudiovisual.com

5816 NW 135th St., Suite A Oklahoma City, OK 73142 www.expresspros.com

COR E Factory Obscura

Edmond, OK 73013 www.pircelang.com

Amusement / Entertainment / Attractions Ms. Laura Massenat............. 326-7248 718 W. Sheridan Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73102-2412 www.factoryobscura.fun

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Investment Management Retirement Planning Wealth Preservation Trust Services Financial Planning Estate Planning Risk Management

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PAYING IT FORWARD

I admire the Y for taking part in bringing these troops here and seeing to it that they have a place they can come before they make the trip to Ft. Sill. - FLOYD Every Tuesday night, Floyd and his daughter Susan volunteer their time at the YMCA Military Welcome Center at Will Rogers World Airport. Veterans themselves, they share stories and brief new recruits on what to expect.

Donate today, for a better us tomorrow.

YMCAOKC.ORG/GIVE

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consulting | implementation | solutions 405.456.9507 wsi-summit.com/chamber Digital Marketing simplified

Kristin uses social media and websites like Facebook or BuzzFeed, but takes the information she finds there with a grain of salt. “They’re definitely not my top sources. When you use social media as your primary source of news, you’re getting a lot of opinions. You’re not always getting facts,” she says. AMERICANSARE3XMORE LIKELY TOTRUST NEWSPAPERSTHANSOCIALMEDIA FOR LOCALNEWS. – AMERICAN PRESS INSTITUTE

I’ll check out social media sites to see what everybody is talking about, and then I turn to

The Oklahoman to get the facts.

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Kristin – Subscriber

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*Source: OPUBCO Brand Survey 2016

THE POINT - FEBRUARY 2019 24

give the WARMTH of hope

feedthechildren.org

ART CAN MAKEAN IMPACT

An Allied Arts employee giving campaign is the solution to enhancing employee engagement at your workplace, while inspiring your team to support the arts. With you, art can empower & motivate!

Contact: Shannon.Lockwood@alliedartsokc.com Donors who contribute $50 or more receive an OKCityCard. Download our new app to view our exclusive discounts.

DAVID HAGER Devon Energy Corporation Vice Chair, Forward Oklahoma City STEVE HAHN AT&T Oklahoma Vice Chair, Membership JUDY J. HATFIELD, CCIM Equity Commercial Realty, LLC Vice Chair, Military and Aerospace BRADLEY W. KRIEGER Arvest Bank Vice Chair, Government Relations BILL LANCE The Chickasaw Nation Vice Chair, Member Health Care Initiative TOM J. MCDANIEL American Fidelity Foundation Vice Chair, MAPS Development 2019 OFFICERS

THE POINT! ISSUE #3528 - February 2019 Editorial staff: Kaylee Terracina, Nate Fisher, Cynthia Reid

PERCY KIRK Cox Communications Chair RHONDA HOOPER Jordan Advertising Immediate Past Chair JOHN HART Continental Resources Treasurer

JENNY LOVE MEYER Love’s Travel Stops and Country Stores Vice Chair, Marketing and Communications J. LARRY NICHOLS Devon Energy Corporation Vice Chair, Strategic Planning NATALIE SHIRLEY National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum Vice Chair, Convention and Visitor Development KENT SHORTRIDGE Oklahoma Natural Gas Company Vice Chair, Community Initiatives SEAN TRAUSCHKE OGE Energy Corp. Vice Chair, Economic Development ROY H. WILLIAMS, CCE Greater Oklahoma City Chamber President & CEO

Designer: Josh Vaughn

297-8900 thepoint@okcchamber.com www.okcchamber.com www.twitter.com/okcchamber www.facebook.com/okcchamber The Point (ISSN 1075-6264) is published monthly by the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber, 123 Park Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73102.

DAVID E. RAINBOLT BancFirst Corporation Corporate Secretary CLAYTON I. BENNETT Dorchester Capital Vice Chair, Strategic Planning TERESA ROSE CROOK Communities Foundation of Oklahoma Vice Chair, Education CARL E. EDWARDS Price Edwards & Company Vice Chair, Innovation and Bioscience

e-mail thepoint@okcchamber.com.

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