Fabey Dental - September 2019

From DJ to Dentist

Memories From My First Job

September 2019

Labor Day is a chance to celebrate the hard work of everyone in the country, especially the work of those whose efforts often go unseen. For me, the holiday has extra resonance because my very first paying gig for my first real job happened over Labor Day weekend. I began my life as a working “adult” (I use the quotes because I’m not sure a college student qualifies as an adult) as a DJ. As much as I’d love to tell you that I was a cutting- edge DJ who filled clubs and introduced people to sounds they’d never heard before, my role was decidedly more workmanlike. I was employed by a company who did events, mostly weddings with the occasional anniversary and birthday party mixed in. It may not have been the DJ-as-the-main-attraction style developing at clubs during that era, but it was an awesome job, and one I still recall fondly. This was long before the days of Apple Music and Spotify. We didn’t have an uncountable number of songs just a few clicks and keystrokes away. What we had were vinyl records. And as a wedding DJ, I needed a lot of them. Thankfully, Philly had a robust record store culture at the time, with shops in every neighborhood catering to every kind of music listener. I still remember the specialty store that sold records primarily intended for the dance floor. Most of their stock was 12-inch singles, a relatively new invention at the time, and it consisted primarily of unofficial releases, AKA bootlegs. Back then, intrepid record- makers would create discs that had songs or versions of songs never released by the artists or the labels affiliated with them. I remember one such record, a 12- inch where one side was a mix of The Jackson 5 tunes, absolutely crushing it at parties.

amount of the money I made went into buying new records. Even though it wasn’t a viable long-term career option for me, I loved the time I spent doing it. In fact, I still have all my records, and it’s fun to see the format coming back into vogue again. While the convenience of streaming is wonderful, there’s some indefinable quality that makes vinyl feel special. That quality is probably why I’ve held onto them for all these years, and I have no intention of seeing them go anywhere. Believe it or not, there are a fewways in which being a dentist isn’t so different from being a wedding DJ. They both require good dexterity and a knack for organization. They’re both jobs where every moment matters. Most of all, though, they are jobs revolving around putting others first. Awedding DJ can’t go on some intrepid journey into the deepest obscurities of their collection because the gig is about making people feel good and giving them a great time. Similarly, dentistry is about focusing on patients’ needs and providing each of them with an experience tailored to them. If you’ve ever been to a wedding where the DJ is an egomaniac or to a dentist who treats you as an anonymous set of teeth, you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about. No matter what job you do, I want to thank you for it. Whether you’re the CEO of a Fortune 500 company or a stay-at-home mom or dad, we all work hard in life. “I still have all my records, and it’s fun to see the format coming back into vogue again. While the convenience of streaming is wonderful, there’s some indefinable quality that makes vinyl feel special.” 1 Published by The Newsletter Pro | www.TheNewsletterPro.com -Dr. Mark Fabey

Fabey Dental 2690 Kingston Rd. Easton, PA 18045

610-810-2704

FabeyDentalStudios.com

Eventually, though, I did the numbers and realized being a wedding DJ wasn’t all that profitable. A good

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