Biola_Catalog_19910101NA

University Catalog Table of Contents UNIVERSITY INFORMATION General Information ............................1 Historical Sketch

GRADUATE PROGRAMS Talbot School o f Theology ................. G-l General Information........................... G-l Master of Divinity Program................G-5 Master of Arts Program in Ministry..................................... G-9 Master of Arts in Ministry Prerequisite T rack ...................... GT1 Master of A rts................................... G-12 Master of Arts Program in Christian Education.................... G-14 Master of Arts Program in Marriage and Family Ministries..................G-16 Master of Theology Program.......... G-17 Doctor of Education Program......... G-19 Doctor of Ministry Program ........... G-23 Departments and Course Descriptions................................. G-26 Independent Studies........................ G-43 Talbot Graduate Student Awards....G-45 Rosemead School o fPsychology ...... G-47 School o fIntercultural Studies ........G-63 School o fA rts and Sciences ............G-73 Appendix ...........................................A-l Index

Special Programs ...............................24 Biola Abroad Biola-Israel American Studies Program Latin American Studies Program Summer Session Interterm Army ROTC Air Force ROTC Undergraduate Program ................... 27 Admission Procedure Transfer Students Advanced Placement Program College Level Examination Program Challenging a Course Classification of Students Community (Junior) College Transfer Academic Standards School Honors Biblical Studies and Theology Requirement General Education Requirement Student A ctivities ............................... 31 Devotional Life Associated Students Student Missionary Union Athletics Student Publications Forensics Student Ministry UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM COURSE DESCRIPTIONS A r t ............................................................... 34 B ib lica l S tud ies ........................................ 37 B iochem istry ............................................. 46 B iological Science .................................... 40 Business A dm in is tra tio n ........................ 43 C hem istry .................................................. 46 Christian E d u ca tio n ........... ................... 47 C omm un ica tion ....................................... 50 Computer S c ience .................................... 54 E duca tion .................................................. 55 E n g lish ....................................................... 57 Foreign Languages ................................... 59 Geography .................................................. 62 H istory ........................................................ 60 H um an ities ................................................ 63 In tercu ltu ra l S tud ies ............................... 64 M a them a tics ............................................. 66 M usic ........................................................... 68 N ursing . ...................................................... 72 Philosophy .................................................. 76 Physical E d u ca tio n ................................. 77 Physical Science ....................................... 79 Political Science ....................................... 81 Psychology .................................................. 83 Social Science ........................................... 85 Sociology .................................................... 85 General S tu d ie s ....................................... 87 Continuing S tu d ie s ................................. 88 A p p lica tio n ................................................ 90

The Mission of Biola University The Objectives of the University Accreditation and Affiliations Doctrinal Statement

The Community of La Mirada The Biola University Campus Library Financial Information .........................6 Adm ission, Registration and Graduation Requirements Admission/Registration Requirements ....13 Undergraduate/Graduate Programs Re-Admission Admission of International Students and Resident Aliens Veterans

Registration Withdrawal Attendance Grades Auditors Academic Load Numbering of Courses Transcript Request Name Changes

Extracurricular Activities Pre-professional Courses Degrees Offered Undergraduate Programs Graduation Requirements .....................18 Requirements for All Baccalaureate Degrees Requirements for all Graduate Degrees Commencement Summary of University Enrollment Fall Semester 1990 Summary of University Graduating Class 1989-90 Academic Year Academic and Behavioral Standards...AS Statement of Satisfactory Academic Progress Academic Probation Appeals Academic Integrity Community Agreements Student Services ................................. 21 Residence Life Housing Commuter Students Food Service Bookstore Student Health Services Campus Safety International Student Relations Counseling Services The Career and Learning Assistance Service Appeals and Grievances

1 GENERAL INFORMATION

General Information Carrying on a tradition of educational excellence that dates back over 80 years, Biola University now encompasses four schools: The School of Arts and Sciences, Rosemead School of Psychology, Talbot School of Theology, and the School of Intercultural Studies. Offering three baccalaureate degrees in 23 majors, 11 masters and five doctoral degrees, Biola’s commitment to academic excellence is firmly rooted in its adherence to an in-depth, knowledgeable and alive Christianity. Each year, over 3,000 students find Biola’s unique blend of faith and learning conducive to their academic and vocational goals. HISTORICAL SKETCH The cornerstone of the original Bible Institute build­ ing in Los Angeles — and the future university— was laid on May 31,1913, and dedicated with these words: “For the teaching of the truths for which the Institute stands, its doors are to be open every day of the year, and all people, without reference to race, color or class will ever be welcome to its privileges.” Spoken by Lyman Stewart, president of the Institute and co-founder of the Union Oil Company, the words capture the vision of Biola’s founders. Stewart, togeth­ er with T.C. Horton, had initiated the Bible Institute, with the first permanent organization taking shape in 1908. By 1912, the school had grown in its outreach and constituency sufficiently to call R.A. Torrey, a lead­ er in the field of Christian Education, as the first dean. The next seven decades have witnessed tremendous growth in the development and outreach of the school. Under the leadership of Dr. Louis T. Talbot, president from 1932 to 1952, the Bible Institute program became a four-year course, leading to degrees in theology, Christian education and sacred music. The School of Missionary Medicine came into being in 1945, laying the foundation for Biola’s current baccalaureate nurs­ ing program. In 1949, the Bible Institute was renamed Biola College. Dr. Samuel H. Sutherland became president in 1952 and with his leadership, the college obtained regional and professional accreditation. Additionally, many new programs of study were introduced, including Talbot Theological Seminary. The demands imposed by the growing student body and the enlarged curriculum prompted the purchase of a seventy-five acre site in La Mirada. Biola moved to the new site in 1959. Dr. Sutherland retired as president in 1970, but continues to lend leadership as a member of Biola’s Board of Trustees. That same year, Dr. J. Richard Chase became Biola’s sixth president. In 1977, the graduate programs ofRosemead Graduate School of Professional Psychologywere acquired by Biola and relocated on the La Mirada campus. The undergradu­ ate programs in psychologywere merged with Rosemead’s graduate programs in the fall of 1981, forming the present Rosemead School of Psychology. Dr. Clyde Cook became the seventh president of Biola

on June 1,1982. Under his leadership, the School of Intercultural Studies was instituted as part of the University, beginning in the fall of 1983. Talbot School of Theology also began in the fall of 1983 as the result of a merger between appropriate undergraduate programs and the graduate programs ofTalbot Theological Seminary. Because of the University’s heritage and commit­ ment, its academic basis is broader than that of the stan­ dard college of arts and sciences. Terminal and preparatory programs lead to service in both church- related vocations and the many other vocations and professions embraced by the present curricula. In addi­ tion, the University is a Christian institution of higher education without any denominational affiliation. From an institute to a university, Biola’s real corner­ stone has remained the same: commitment to Jesus Christ, the inerrancy of Scripture and biblical Christianity, (within an evangelical Protestant frame­ work) as well as to the spiritual, academic and holistic growth of those who are personally committed to Him. THE MISSION OF BIOLA UNIVERSITY The mission of Biola University is to be a Christian university providing education at the baccalaureate and post-baccalaureate levels in biblical studies and theolo­ gy, in the liberal arts and sciences, and in selected applied and professional fields. It is to be Christian in the sense that the biblical Christian world view serves as the all-encompassing framework and integrating basis for the entire content and conduct of the institu­ tion. It is to be a university in the full traditional mean­ ing of the term, with knowledge and understanding being generated and disseminated, with students and faculty continually developing to high levels their cogni­ tive and affective potential, and with society being served beneficially thereby. In combining the two terms, Christian and university, considerable emphasis is placed upon the scholarly integration of biblical faith with all of the fields of learning, and also upon the prac­ tical interrelationships and interdependencies of faith, learning and living as they are developed throughout the curriculum and the life-style. The mission of the University is to produce graduates who are (a) competent in their fields of study, (b) knowl­ edgeable in biblical studies, and (c) earnest Christians equipped to serve the Christian community and society at large. An expanded version of this statement is print­ ed elsewhere in the catalog, for the institution as a whole and also for some of the specific programs. There are two additional “products” of the University, both of which are to be viewed as outgrowths of the task of producing graduates of its baccalaureate and post-baccalaureate programs and not as separate from it. One consists of the scholarly contributions to knowledge and understanding which are generated by students and faculty in the disciplines and in integration with the biblical Christian world view. The other consists of public services as students, facul- ty and staff make their professional and personal exper-

B iola’s environm ent is unique: a close-knit atmo­ sphere combined with exten­ sive university programs and resources. Balancing our outstanding professional preparation is a friendly, caring community with accessibility to faculty, widespread student activi­ ties, and opportunities to cultivate life-longfriendships.

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GENERAL INFORMATION

tise available to the Christian community and to society at large throughout the world. In brief, the mission of Biola University is to equip Christians to impact the world for Jesus Christ, primari­ ly through the ongoing lives of its graduates but also through the in-service work of its present students, faculty and staff. THE OBJECTIVES OF THE UNIVERSITY Biola University seeks to instruct Christian men and women in order to produce graduates who are: 1. Competent in their field of study; 2. Knowledgeable in biblical studies; 3. Earnest Christians equipped to serve the Christian community and society at large. With particular reference to the undergraduate programs, the intention of the University is to seek to produce a graduate who is: 1. Broadly educated in the arts and sciences with a biblical perspective as the foundation. a. One who has broad exposure to the ideas that have shaped man’s thinking. b. One who knows how to use reasoning processes: (1) who can use the processes of investigation, (2) who can reason logically, (3) who recognizes that man cannot rely on reason and experience alone but must also exercise faith. c. One who can communicate and defend his* ideas on the basis of evidence. d. One who has a well-conceived system of values and beliefs which are biblically based and which mediate behavior. e. One who understands and appreciates ethnic and cultural differences. f. One who understands himself, has a good self- image and is striving to realize his potential. g. One who understands the various creative expressions of man’s ideas and feelings in art, drama, music and literature. 2. Competent in his major. a. One who is competently prepared for service in those programs that lead directly to a vocation or profession, with all programs having the potential of preparing students for Christian ministries. b. One who is thoroughly prepared for graduate study in those programs where graduate degrees are offered. 3. Knowledgeable in biblical studies. a. One who has a clear understanding of the content of the Bible commensurate in units with an undergraduate major. b. One who has integrated biblical thought into his major fields of interest. 4. Able through his vocation, church and community to make distinctive contributions to mankind and to enhance the spiritual well-being of those whom and with whom he serves.

a. One who has developed and maintained high moral standards for his own benefit and in order that he might serve as a wholesome example and leader. b. One who expresses through his life a clear commitment to Christ, who is able openly and wisely to share both his knowledge of the Bible and his commitment to Christ with others; and who demonstrate Christian love toward others. c. One who is prepared to fulfill Christ’s commis­ sion to make disciples of all nations. d. One who is sensitive to the total needs of his fellow man and who is equipped to contribute to the meeting of those needs. e. One who holds to the conviction that the Christian is to be a good citizen of the state, one who respects authority, submits to the laws of the land and seeks constructive change through legal channels. *All third person pronouns are usedgenetically. ACCREDITATION AND AFFILIATIONS Biola University holds institutional accreditation by the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. In addition, the institution and certain of its programs are accredited by the American Psychological Association, the Association of Theological Schools, the National Association of Schools of Music, the State of California Board of Registered Nursing, the National League for Nursing, the California Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing. Biola University is authorized to train students under the Veteran’s Bill of Rights. In addition, the college is affiliated with a number of professional orga­ nizations, of which the following are representative: American Anthropological Association; American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education; American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers; American Association of Health, Physical Education and Recreation; American Council on Education; American Guild of Organists; American Intercollegiate Athletic Women; American Library Association; Associated Collegiate Press; Association of Christian Schools, International; Association of College Unions International; American Association of Higher Education; Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities; California Association of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation; California Council on the Education of Teachers; Choral Conductors’Guild (California); Christian College Coalition; Christian Scholar’s Review; College Entrance Examination Board; Council on Post-secondary Accreditation; Evangelical Teacher Training Association; Intercollegiate Press; Music Educator’s National Conference; National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics; Western Association of Graduate Schools; Western Council on Higher Education for Nursing; and Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education.

Man was created in the image of God, after His like­ ness, but the whole human race fell in the fall of the first Adam. All men, until they accept the Lord Jesus as their personal Savior, are lost, darkened in their under­ standing, alienated from the life of God through the ignorance that is in them, hardened in heart, morally and spiritually dead through their trespasses and sins. They cannot see, nor enter the kingdom of God until they are born again of the Holy Spirit. Men are justified on the simple and single ground of the shed blood of Christ and upon the simple and single condi­ tion of frith in Himwho shed the blood, and are bom again by the quickening, renewing, cleansing work of the Holy Spirit, through the instrumentality of the Word of God. All those who receive Jesus Christ as their Savior and their Lord, and who confess Him as such before their fellow men, become children of God and receive eternal life. They become heirs of God and joint-heirs with Jesus Christ. At death their spirits depart to be with Christ in conscious blessedness, and at the second coming of Christ their bodies shall be raised and trans­ formed into the likeness of the body of His glory. All those who persistently reject Jesus Christ in the present life shall be raised from the dead and through­ out eternity exist in the state of conscious, unutterable, endless torment and anguish. The Church consists of all those who, in this present dispensation, truly believe in Jesus Christ. It is the body and bride of Christ, which Christ loves and for which He has given Himself. There is a personal devil, a being of great cunning and power: “The prince of the power of the air,” “The prince of this world,” “The god of this age.” He can exert vast power only so far as God suffers him to do so. He shall ultimately be cast into the lake of fire and brim­ stone and shall be tormented day and night forever. Note: This doctrinal statement, presented here as orig­ inally conceived by the founders o f the organization, has been and continues to be the stated theological position o f Biola University. In addition, the following explanatory notes indicate the organization’s understanding and teaching position on certain points which could be subject to various interpretations: The Scriptures are to be interpreted according to dispensational distinctives with the conviction that the return of the Lord for His Church will be premillennial, before the Tribulation, and that the Millennium is to be the last of the dispensations. The existence of the Creation is not explainable apart from the roles of God as the sovereign creator and sustain- er of file entire natural realm. Concepts such as theistic or threshold evolution do not adequately explain creation. Though there may be many fillings of the Holy Spirit, there is only one baptism which occurs at the time of regeneration. God gives His gifts to His people in His sovereignty and not on demand. The charismat­ ic manifestations (e.g., tongues and healing) had special significance during the revelatory period of the New Testament apostolic era and are not at all a neces­ sary special work of the Holy Spirit today.

DOCTRINAL STATEMENT Inasmuch as the University is interdenominational and yet theologically conservative, the Articles of Incorpora­ tion contain a doctrinal statement which is given below: The Bible, consisting of all the books of the Old and New Testaments, is the Word of God, a supernaturally given revelation from God Himself, concerning Himself, His being, nature, character, will and purpos­ es; and concerning man, his nature, need and duty and destiny. The Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are without error or misstatement in their moral and spiritual teaching and record of historical facts. They are without error or defect of any kind. There is one God, eternally existing and manifesting Himself to us in three Persons — Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Our Lord Jesus was supernaturally conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of a virgin — Mary, a lineal descendant of David. He lived and taught and wrought mighty works and wonders and signs exactly as is recorded in the four Gospels. He was put to death by crucifixion under Pontius Pilate. God raised from the dead the body that had been nailed to the cross. The Lord Jesus after His crucifixion showed Himself to be alive to His disciples, appearing unto them by the space of forty days. After this the Lord Jesus ascended into heaven, and the Father caused Him to sit at His right hand in the heavenly places, far above all rule and authority and power and dominion, and every name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come, and put all things in subjection under His feet, and gave Him to be Head over all things to the Church. The Lord Jesus, before His incarnation, existed in the form of God and of His own choice laid aside His divine glory and took upon Himself the form of a servant and was made in the likeness of men. In His pre-existent state He was with God and was God. He is a divine person possessed of all the attributes of Deity, and should be worshiped as God by angels and man. “In Him dwelleth all the fullness of the Godhead bodi­ ly.” All the words that He spoke during His earthly life were the words of God. There is absolutely no error of any kind in them, and by the words of Jesus Christ the words of all other teachers must be tested. The Lord Jesus became in every respect a real man, pos­ sessed of all the essential characteristics ofhuman nature. By His death on the cross, the Lord Jesus made a perfect atonement for sin, by which the wrath of God against sinners is appeased and a ground furnished upon which God can deal in mercy with sinners. He redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse in our place. He who Himself was absolutely without sin was made to be sin on our behalf that we might become the righteousness of God in Him. The Lord Jesus is coming again to his earth, personally, bodily, and visibly. The return of our Lord is the blessed hope of the believer, and in it God’s purposes of grace toward mankind will find their consummation. The Holy Spirit is a person, and is possessed of all the distinctively divine attributes. He is God.

GENERAL INFORMATION

The Bible is clear in its teaching on the sanctity of human life. life begins at conception. We abhor the destruction of innocent life through abortion-on-demand. Confession before men is viewed as tangible fruit of salvation and not as a qualifying condition for salvation. Biola University does not necessarily deny employ­ ment to persons merely for lack of firm personal convic­ tions on any teaching position in these explanatory notes. However, Biola University does weigh carefully the understanding and personal convictions of employ­ ment applicants on these points as well as the nature of their prospective work assignments, in determining their suitability for employment. TEACHING BIBLICAL STUDIES Teaching biblical studies for academic credit at Biola University is a complex situation. A major goal of all teaching is for the student to gain knowledge and under­ standing of the subject matter as well as familiarity with the methodology of the field. Such a goal is of impor­ tance here. The Scriptures, however, are considered more than academic subject matter. They are the Word of God written for the purpose of revealing God and His actions with the desire of bringing people to harmony with Him. Our acceptance of the divine nature and intent of Scripture gives ultimate meaning and direction to all studies relating to the Scriptures. Entailed in the further­ ance of the divine intent of Scripture are many facets of study ranging from the practical procedures for the prop­ agation of the Christian faith to the highly technical dimensions of critical biblical studies and philosophical theology. Throughout this diversity of endeavors and the wide variety of gifts and skills employed, however, all participants are finally engaged in a common task which may be summarily stated as the understanding, accep­ tance and propagation of the biblical faith. THE COMMUNITY OF LA MIRADA The city of La Mirada is in LosAngeles County, 22 miles southeast of downtown LosAngeles, and is surrounded by such cities as Whittier, Norwalk, Buena Park, La Habra and Fullerton. La Mirada is a suburban residential community with a population of 40,000. Included within the vicinity are several major shopping areas in addition to many other business establishments. La Mirada is situated near many of the outstanding attractions of Southern California. Downtown LosAngeles can be reached in a half-hour’s drive from the campus. Disneyland is 12miles to the southeast and famed Knott’s Berry Farm is six miles away. Within an hour’s drive are such popular beach cities as Long Beach, Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach. Recreational facilities are easily accessible. An 18-hole golf course lies a mile east of the campus and other parks in the area offer opportunity for activities and relaxation. An hour’s drive will take one into the nearby mountains where winter sports are available. Cultural and research opportunities abound in the area Several major universities and libraries are within easy

driving distance ofLa Mirada including the University of California LosAngeles. The University of Southern California the University of California, Irvine and several other state and private institutions. THE BIOLA UNIVERSITY CAMPUS The campus is bounded on the west by BiolaAvenue and on the east by La Mirada Boulevard. It is located between the large east-west thoroughfares of Rosecrans Avenue and Imperial Highway. Approximately three miles to the southwest is the SantaAna Freeway (Freeway 1-5). Students coming to the campus by automobile should follow these directions: coming from the north­ west, leave the Santa Ana Freeway at Rosecrans and travel east to Biola Avenue; coming from the southeast, leave the Santa Ana Freeway at ValleyView and travel north to Rosecrans, then turn right to Biola Avenue, coming from the east via San Bernardino Freeway (10) turn south on the Orange Freeway (57) to Imperial Highway and travel west on Imperial Highway to Biola Avenue. (Note: See inside cover map.) The campus now consists of 95 acres with over 1/2 million square feet of building space in 30 major buildings. Just under half of the space is dedicated to 7 student resi­ dence complexes, housing nearly 1,400 students in a fine variety of living quarters. The rest of the buildings house classrooms, laboratories, auditoriums, offices and students services. Highlights of the buildings include Soubirou Hall, containing specialized classrooms for nursing instruction, along with nursing department facul­ ty offices; LansingAuditorium, a 450-seat concert hall with a fine pipe organ and excellent acoustics; the Rose of Sharon Chapel., a small chapel exclusively reserved for silent prayer and meditation; and a gymnasium-swimming complex with a short-course Olympic pool. On the eastern side of the campus lie the athletic fields. Included are a crushed brick quarter-mile track, an excellent baseball diamond, a soccer field, and tennis courts. Additional recreation facilities are locat­ ed in the 105-acre La Mirada Regional Park, just across La Mirada Boulevard from the Biola campus. In addition, Biola has recently completed a lease- purchase agreement on 20 acres adjoining the main campus which formerly housed an intermediate school. This land includes 58,000 square feet of classroom and office buildings, and over 10 acres of athletic fields available for Biola’s extensive intramural program and for informal recreation. During the 1989/90 school year, several additions to the campus were completed. A three-building residen­ tial complex will serve a variety of needs, from under­ graduate housing in a residence hall to graduate and married housing in apartment-style living. The Student Union Building has been expanded, and the Bookstore has been replaced by a new, larger building. A new energy-efficient Central Plant for heating, cooling, and cogeneration is now complete. The plant provides a cost efficient means of air conditioning our older class­ rooms and residential buildings for the first time.

O ur 95-acre campus is nestled in the city o fLa

M irada, a qu iet, conserva­ tive residential community 20 m iles southeast o fLos Angeles. D isneyland, K nott’s Berry Farm and Southern California beaches and m ountains are ju s t m iles away.

5 GENERAL INFORMATION

THE LIBRARY The Rose Memorial library serves Biola University as the central library facility on campus, supporting the needs of all the undergraduate and graduate programs with extensive resources and a wide variety of services. In addition to more than 206,000 books, the library currently subscribes to more than 850 periodical titles, with a number of bound journal backfiles dating from the nineteenth century. Special holdings reflect Biola’s enthusiasm and scholarly interest in Bible history and translation, the historical roots of fundamentalism and evangelical Christianity, and the worldwide witness of Christian missions. Auxiliary collections embrace extensive microform resources; many reference resources in Braille; comprehensive pamphlet files including maps, charts, mission resources, and a wide variety of topics in the liberal arts; and special holdings of text and curriculum resources appropriate to teacher education. To facilitate study and the use of library resources, the Rose Memorial library provides access to several copy machines, rental typewriters, microfilm readers and read­ er-printers. Study tables and individual carrels can accommodate approximately 400 patrons at any one time. Library services offer trained reference help at all times, with special effort made to relate students and faculty to other important library resources of the southern California area and throughout the nation. Reciprocal borrowing privileges are available for under­ graduate and graduate students to use the impressive resources at California State University at Fullerton. Traditional interlibrary loan services are provided. Computer services, in-house and by network, help scholars to access the national bibliographical data bases of OCLC and DIALOG. Five professional librarians, supported by a dozen regular staff and numerous student assistants, comprise a library workforce dedicated to service over a span of 77 hours per week during the regular semester. MEDIA CENTER The Media Center services the equipment and non­ book instruction needs of the University. Equipment and instructional materials are located on the McNally portion of the campus. The collection of material includes motion pictures and film clips, filmstrips, audio tape recordings, video tape recordings, disc records, overhead transparencies, slides and other types of educational material. Appropriate equipment is avail­ able for large group, small group or individual study of the instructional materials. Production of slides, filmstrips, thermal or diazo transparencies as well as many other services are avail­ able to the faculty upon request THE ROLE OF MICROCOMPUTERS IN THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS OF THE UNIVERSITY Biola University believes that the microcomputer is an increasingly valuable tool and that one of our educa­ tional goals should be to prepare students for a world in

which the computer will continue to play a significant role. Accordingly, it is our desire to integrate computer usage into the university curriculum. Thus, the University provides access to Macintosh microcomputers for every student and requires their use in freshman English. It is the intent of the University, over time, to require the use of these microcomputers over a wide spectrum of the curriculum. The microcom­ puter of choice at Biola University is the Macintosh. The computer centers and Macintosh labs located across the campus help provide the necessary micro­ computer access for students. Additionally many students have chosen to acquire their own Macintosh. This microcomputer, along with a variety of software and hardware accessories, is available for purchase at the Biola Bookstore at very attractive prices for enrolled students. Complete details are provided to all interested students. Because of the cooperative relationship between Biola University and Apple Computers, Inc., the University has access to technological innovations, seminars, technical expertise and on-line telecommuni­ cations with other universities across the nation. In addition, Biola University is involved as a test site for the evaluation and development of innovations from Apple Computer, Inc. COMPUTER CENTER Located within the bookstore, the Computer Center is designed to meet the computer requirements of the campus for hardware, software and related accessories and are available to Biola faculty, staff and registered Biola students at discounts. Featuring Apple’s Macintosh, the Computer Center provides the comput­ ing tools that the students will find useful in their course of study at Biola. Several courses, including Freshmen English, require that students have access to the Macintosh for completion of course requirements. The Computer Center is intended to serve the Biola campus community for computers, related software and accessories. These are sold exclusively to enrolled students, faculty and staff and are strictly for the purpose of enhancing the educational process. All areas of the Biola Bookstore will have special hours during summer and vacation times; reduced hours during Interterm. Please check with the Bookstore. BOOKSTORE The Biola Bookstore is open Monday through Saturday with evening hours Monday through Thursday for the convenience of students, faculty and staff. All required textbooks as well as general books and supplies are available. The bookstore has a large selection of Christian books, and offers Bibles in a vari­ ety of styles and bindings at substantial discounts. Biola insignia clothing and a large selection of cards, supplies, gift items, music, and personal care items are also available.

Since the early 1980s, Biola has integrated computers throughout its curriculum . Several M acintosh labs are located on campus providing each student with access to term inals. Special discount programs are available to students w ishing to purchase Apple computers.

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6 FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Financial Information Biola University seeks to provide a quality education for all its students at the most reasonable cost possible. As a private, non-profit institution, Biola University receives no support from taxes or other public funds. Tuition paid by die students does not cover the costs of providing a quality education. Consequently, every student who attends Biola University receives a substantial subsidy made possible by the gifts of alumni, individual friends, interested churches and, in a few cases, businesses and corporations. The expenses o fstudents at Biola University are shown in thefollowing schedules. The University reserves the right to change all student charges, modify its services, or change its programs o fstudy should economic conditions, curriculum revisions or national emergency make it necessary to do so. APPLICATION FEE An application fee of $35 must accompany each appli­ cation. This fee is nonrefundable. Applications for spring received after January 1, or for fall received after August 1must be accompanied by a fee of $45 rather than $35. ROOM Per Year in residence ha ll............................$2,000-2,440 Per semester............................................$1,000-1,220 MEAL PLAN Meal Tickets (required for all resident students) Per year.................................................... $1,670-1,890 Per semester................... ............................... $835-945

APARTMENT RENT One-bedroom, unfurnished (married couples) $690/month, all utilities included Two-bedroom, furnished (single students) $270/person/month, all utilities included, based on four-person occupancy GENERAL FEES (In addition to tuition, only as applicable to the individual student) Room Reservation D eposit..........................$100.00 * Enrollment Deposit (nonrefundable) Undergraduate...............................................100.00 Graduate Psychology.................................... 100.00 All other programs..........................................50.00 Late Registration — Any time after scheduled registration...................................................... 35.00 Late Pre-registration —Any time after scheduled pre-registration but before end of semester ..15.00 Change of Class Schedule...................................4.00 ** Accident and Medical Insurance (Fall estimate — $98.50; Spring estimate — $98.50; $50,000 maximum).............................................. e s t 197.00 Parking F e e ........................................................17.00 Transcript Fee ......................................................5.00 *Upon notice of acceptance, an enrollment deposit is required. This amount is applicable toward the total expenses during the student’s last semester of enroll­ ment, but is forfeited if the applicant fails to report for the semester for which application was made.

F inancia l A id Office (213 ) 903-4742 Monday - Friday 8:00 a .m . - 4 :30p.m .

BIOLA UNIVERSITY TUITION INFORMATION SUMMER

SEMESTER

SESSION

SESSION

INTERTERM AUDIT

SEMESTER

ANNUAL TUITION

COST

1991

1992

FEE

SCHOOL/DEGREE/PROGRAM TUITION

PER UNIT

PER UNIT

PER UNIT

PER UNIT

Undergraduate Tuition

(12-18 units)

(12-18 units)

(1-11,19+)

(including A.S. fee)

$4,951

$9,902

$413

$168

$185

$50

Special Studen t Tuition (non-degree seeking)

Undergraduate Special Students

4,951

9,902

413

168

185

50

C ontinuing Studies

Adult D egree P rogram

$235 pe r unit;

F irs t Term=$2,820;

Second Term=$3,290;

Th ird Term=$3,525

G raduate Tuition School o fA r ts and Sciences & G raduate Special Students

(includ ing A .S . fe e ) (post baccalaureate except Rosemead)

241 pe r unit

241 p e r un it

241 p e r unit

241 p e r unit*

241 pe r unit

50

School o fIn tercu ltura l Studies (includ ing A S . fee)

Master’s Programs and specials

241 pe r unit 413 p e r unit 413 p e r unit

241 p e r unit 413 p e r unit 413 p e r unit

241 pe r unit 413 p e r unit 413 p e r unit

241 pe r unit* 382 p e r unit 382 p e r unit*

241 p e r unit 413 p e r unit 413 p e r unit

50

Doctor o f Education Doctor o f Missiology

413 pe r unit 413 p e r unit

Talbot School o f Theology (including A S . fee) Master’s P rogram s and specials 241 pe r unit

241 p e r un it 413 p e r unit 749 /Course

241 p e r unit 413 p e r unit 749 /Course

241 pe r unit* 382 p e r unit 695 /Course

241 pe r unit 413 p e r unit 749/Course

50

Doctor o f Education Doctor o f M inistry

413 p e r unit 749 /Course

413 p e r unit 749/Course

Rosemead School o fPsychology (including A.S. fee) M as ter of A rts and specials

(9-16 units)

(9-16 units)

(1-8,17+ units)

5,267 5,267 5,267

10,534 10,534 10,534

439 439 439

407 407 407

439 439 439

439 439

Doctor o f Philosophy Doctor o f Psychology

439 * Summer Session tuition 1991=$149 p e r unit; figures noted above illustrate th e new tuition model for all a s terisked p rogram s beginning In te rterm and Summer 1992.

7 FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Accompanying Fees, Per Semester: Voice students per unit of study.......................35.00 Instrumental students per unit of study..........25.00 Recital Fees (Fees range from $12.00 to $30.00 depending upon length of recital, length and complexity of printed program required. Complete information available in the music office.) Class Instruction (Provides for low student-faculty ratio of approxi­ mately 10:1, additional class hours beyond unit value, and acquisition and maintenance of special­ ized equipment as necessary.) Voice or Guitar.................................................. 55.00 Electronic Piano Lab: Two hours per w eek ..................................... 90.00 (The University has the following organs: a 26-rank, three-manual Schantz; a 12-rank, two-manual Tracker; a two-manual Rogers 110; and two two-manual Rogers 75.) TYPICAL COSTS The combination of tuition, fees and associated expenses at Biola University is sufficiently high that it is necessary for students to carefully calculate their financial resources and costs. The following estimated student budget reflects the average cost to full-time students for the 1990-91 academic year (nine month):

**Required of all students with more than six units and who do not file a “Certification of Insurance Coverage” at the time of registration. Additional coverage is required of all students participating in or practicing for intercollegiate sports. (Yearly fees are based on group rates which are determined at the time of registration.) SPECIAL FEES — UNDERGRADUATE There are special fees for specific labs, clinics, physi­ cal education/recreation and camping courses, etc. See course descriptions for fees. Class and Laboratory Fees......................... $8.00-100.00 Nursing/Business Application F e e ....................... 20.00 Nursing Late Application Fee................................. 10.00 Nursing Liability Insurance (per yea r) ................. 13.50 Commitment and Pinning Service (per year)........ 5.00 RN/LVN Nursing Challenge Examination (per theory and per clinical challenge)........... 50.00

Renewable m erit scholar­ ships are available to high ranking freshm en and trans­ fers. Included are honor scholarships, dean's scholar­ ships, leadership awards, and the ethnic scholars program . Am ounts range from $2000 to fu ll tuition.

SPECIAL FEES — GRADUATE Doctor o fM in istry Program Enrollment Deposit

per course (non-refundable)...................... $100.00 Late Enrollment F ee ........................................ 100.00 Late Project F e e ................................................. 50.00 Dissertation Fee............................................... 749.00

Undergraduate

G raduate Psychology Program Admissions Personal Interview Fee

Off

On

With

Campus $9,902

Campus $9,902

Parents

(non-refundable)............................................ $50.00 Professional Growth Fee (per semester)...... 500.00 (Terminal M.A. students are required to pay the Professional Growth fee for three semesters Students in the Psy.D. or Ph.D. programs pay the fee for a total of ten semesters, including those students who enter Rosemead with transfer credit) Thesis/D issertation B ind ing /M icro film ing Binding (per copy)........................................... $20.00 (University requires 4 copies) Personal binding (per copy) (op t)................. 20.00 Microfilming/Indexing (1 copy required) Doctoral dissertation......................................45.00 Master’s thesis.......................... ...................... 15.00 Copyright — dissertation or thesis (opt.)....... 25.00 (One unit guarantees a minimum of 13 one half-hour lessons for the semester. In some cases up to 15 lessons may be possible.) Fee includes privilege of practice room use of one hour per day. Music Majors: One Unit (one half-hour lesson per week)............... $180.00 Non-Music Majors (per un it)..................................................... 210.00 MUSIC FEES Private Study Per Unit

Tuition & Fees $9,902 Books & Supplies 558 Room & Board 1,512

558

558

5,112 1,638

4,330 1,638

1,638

Personal/Misc. Transportation

684

576

684

$17,894

$14,294 $17,004

TOTAL

Graduate — M aster’s Programs and Specials (except Rosemead) Off (B a s e d o n 12 u n i t s With On p e r s e m e s t e r ) Paren ts Campus Campus Tuition & Fees $5,784 $5,784 $5,784 Books & Supplies 558 558 558 Room & Board 1,512 4,330 5,112 Personal/Misc. 1,638 1,638 1,638 Transportation 684 576 684 TOTAL $10,176 $12,886 $13,776 Doctoral — Ed.D. and D.M iss. (B a s e d o n 12 u n i t s With On Off p e r s e m e s t e r ) Paren ts Campus Campus Tuition & Fees $9,912 $9,912 $9,912 Books & Supplies 558 558 558 Room & Board 1,512 4,330 5,112 Personal/Misc. 1,638 1,638 1,638 Transportation 684 576 684 TOTAL $14,304 $17,014 $17,904

8 FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Graduate Psychology

Notes *Down payments include the amounts shown on this schedule plus inci­ dental charges such as insurance and vehicle registration. Charges other than tuition, room and board m ust be paid in fu ll a t the tim e o fregistration. 3Down payments in the Graduate Psychologyprogram include the amounts shown on this schedule plus incidental charges such as insurance and vehicle registration. Sixty percent o fthe applicable Professional Growth Fee m ust also be paid a the tim e o fregistration. 3Assumes 12 units per semester. FINANCE CHARGES One percent of the unpaid balance shown on each monthly statement will be added to the account as a finance charge. Transcripts (official and unofficial) are normally withheld if a student has a financial obligations to the University. All payments to a student’s account after enrollment should be addressed as follows: Accounting Department Biola University 13800 Biola Avenue La Mirada, California 90639-0001 In addition, to whom the payment is to be credited must be clearly stated. A student is not registered and cannot attend classes until satisfactory financial arrangements have been made with the Student Accounting Office. REFUNDS — WITHDRAWAL Inasmuch as faculty engagements and other commitments are made by the University for the entire year in advance, the following refund schedule has been established in order that the University and the student may share the loss equitably when it is neces­ sary for a student to withdraw from school: Fall and Spring Semester Refund Policy Withdrawal within the first two weeks of classes: 1. Tuition — full amount, less enrollment deposit (students with six or fewer units, $25; auditors, $20). 2. Room — end of the month in which the student officially checks out of the residence hall. Withdrawal after the second week and before the end of the eighth week of classes (exceptfor special programs): 1. Tuition — pro-rated as of end of week in which student withdraws. Week 3 — 80% Week 4 — 74% Week 5 — 67% Week 6 — 60% Week 7 — 54% Week 8 — 47% 2. Room — end of the month in which the student officially checks out of the residence hall. Withdrawals after eighth week of classes: 1. Tuition — no refund. 2. Room— end of the month in which the student officially checks out the residence hall.

With Paren ts $10,534

On Campus $10,534

Off Campus $10,534

Tuition & Fees

Interterm (1st yr.) 882

882

882

Professional Growth Fee Books & Supplies*

1,000

1,000

1,000

558

558

558

Room & Board 1,512

4,330 1,638

5,112 1,638

Personal/Misc. Transportation**

1,638

684

576

684

TOTAL

$16,808 $19,518

$20,408

*$650 for first year students **May be adjusted for practicum travel expense.

PAYMENT OPTIONS A student’s account must be current (no outstanding balances) prior to re-enrollment in subsequent sessions. Cost of tuition, room and board and special fees may be paid in one of the following ways: P lan 1Payment of each session in full on or before the day of registration. P lan 2A down payment at the time of registration with payment of any remaining balance by the first payment due date (October 15 - fall semester; March 15 - spring semester). Down payments include 60%of the balance of tuition, room and board charges less confirmed financial aid plus 100%of incidental charges such as insurance and vehicle registration. No finance charges are assessed. P lan 3 A down payment as described in PLAN 2with the remaining balance in three payments (October-December or March-May). Afinance charge of 1%per month (12.68% APR) of the unpaid balance at each billing is added to carry the account All payments are due on or before the 15th of the month as indicated in the billing summary. DOWN PAYMENT Minimum down payments* are calculated according to the following schedule: M aster ’ s and S pecial U ndergraduate P rograms 3 On Campus $4,385 $3,150 Off Campus $3,086 $1,851 1-3 units 100% 100% 4-6 units 75% 75% 7 units and above 60% 60% G raduate E d .D.& D.M iss .3 P sychology 3 On Campus $4,388 $4,825 Off Campus $3,089 $3,526 1-3 units 100% 100% 4-6 units 75% 7 units and above 60% 4 units and above 75%

9 FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Grant equal 100%of the difference between tuition, room and board charges, and the calculated amount of other available resources (including family contribu­ tion, state aid, federal aid, University awards, self-help, federal loans and outside sources.) H onor S cholarships (M inimum half mmoN) .Awarded to highest ranking freshmen and transfer students. Based on academic achievement (GPAand SAT) and extracurricu- lar/leadership activities. Selection begins February 1st No separate application required. Renewable ifGPArequire­ ment met (3.4 firstyear, 3.5 second year, 3.6 third year). D ean ’ s S cholarship ($1,000$3,000) . Awarded to high rank­ ing freshmen and transfer students. Based on academic achievement (GPAand SAT) and extracurricular/leader- ship activities. Selection begins February 1st No separate application required. Renewable with 3.2 Bioia GPA. E thnic S choiars P rogram ($l,000-$3,000). In keeping with Biola’s commitment to attracting a culturally diverse student body, the University has reserved a select number of merit scholarships for students of non-white descent Based on academic achievement (GPA and SAT) and extracurricular/leadership activities. Selection begins February 1st No separate application required. Renewable with 3.2 Bioia GPA. L eadership S cholarships ($1,000^3,000). Awarded to freshmen and transfer students who have demonstrated outstanding spiritual leadership in their community. Minimum 2.5 GPA. No separate application required. Awarding begins February 1st Renewable with demon­ strated leadership involvement at Bioia and 2.75 GPA. M issionary /P aspor ’ s D ependent S cholarships ($1,600). All dependents of pastors or missionaries (primary family income must be through a church or mission board) will be awarded a $1,600 scholarship each year of attendance. Dependents of pastors/missionaries must file SAAC or FAF and the appropriate application (available in the Financial Aid Office) to receive this scholarship. C hristian W orkers D ependent S cholarship ($1,000). All dependents of parents employed by a Christian non-profit organization will be eligible for a $1,000 scholarship. Dependents of Christian workers must file the SAAC or FAF and the appropriate application (available in Financial Aid Office) to receive this scholarship. C hurch M atching S cholarship (Up to $500 from Bioia). Open to all Bioia students. Bioia matches up to $500 of support given by churches to individuals each year of attendance. Checks should come in a lump sum (rather than in monthly installments) within the first month of the semester and be made out to Bioia University. Churches are required to send a letter with their check to Financial Aid Office requesting Biola’s match. Biola’s portion will be pro-rated if student is less than full-time. P resident ' s A ward . Full tuition. Senior standingwith intention to graduate at the end of the school year required, alongwith a minimum 3.60 GPA, attendance at Bioia for at least two years as well as personal qualifications. Music A wards , ranging from $600 to $2,600 are made by the music department to music majors with high- performance and scholastic capabilities. The scholar-

In terterm and sum m er session refund policy 1. Room and Board is pro-rated to the end of the week of official withdrawal. 2. $25 of the tuition charge is considered a registration fee and is non-refundable. 3. Pre/unit refunds are subject to the following schedule: • First week — complete refund, except $25 registration fee. • in a twoweek course — no refund the second week. • In a three or four week class, 30 percent refunded during the second week, none thereafter. • In five week classes, 58 percent the second week, 30 %the third week, none thereafter. Tuition refunds for class changes (where applicable) will be made in the same manner as refunds for with­ drawals (i.e., full refund within first two weeks of class­ es and pro-rated refund after second week until end of eighth week). All refunds must be requested by properly completing and submitting a departure card or class drop form, the official withdrawal date determining the amount of refund. Class, laboratory and activity fees are refundable only if withdrawal is on or before the final date of late registration. Music fees are for private music lessons and are refundable in the same manner as tuition, except no refund after the sixth week. REFUNDS — OVERPAYMENT Payments to student accounts which result in a credit balance will be refunded upon request Refund requests will be processed after the credit balance appears on the student’s monthly statement. FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION It is the desire of Biola University, within the limits of its resources, to provide financial assistance to students with demonstrated need, especially those who, without such aid, would not be able to attend Biola. The Financial Aid Office provides counseling and assistance to students and their families in structuring the most appropriate package of financial aid. The University is committed to locating sufficient financial aid to permit enrollment of every student wishing to attend. This commitment is based on a partnership which includes student and family support; federal and state grants and loans; and financial aid from Biola. Biola University does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color or national and ethnic origin in administration of its scholarship and loan programs. UNDERGRADUATE FINANCIAL AID In stitu tiona l A id B iola S cholarships include academic, honor, and presidential awards. M eeting the D ifference . Biola’s Financial Aid Commitment. The University will provide a Bioia Need

Each year, our F inancial A id O ffice disburses over $8,000,000 in scholarships fo r academ ic achievement, athletics, music, communi­ cation, international students, and finan c ia l need. Our F inancial A id s ta ffalso assists students in applying fo r state and federal grants.

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