Razumich & Delamater P.C. November 2018

OPENING STATEMENTS NOVEMBER 2018 WWW.LAWYERSREADYTOFIGHT.COM 317-934-9725 | INFO@RDLAWOFFICE.COM

FROM THE DESKS OF Razumich & Delamater

MAKE EVERY DAY A CELEBRATIONWITH THESE ODD NOVEMBER HOLIDAYS!

1. Men Make Dinner Day 2. Look for Circles Day 3. Sandwich Day 4. King Tut Day

16. Have a Party With Your Bear Day 17. World Peace Day 18. Occult Day 19. Have a Bad Day Day 20. Absurdity Day 21. World Hello Day 22. Go For a Ride Day 23. Buy Nothing Day 24. All Our Uncles Are Monkeys Day 25. National Parfait Day 26. Shopping Reminder Day 27. Pins and Needles Day 28. French Toast Day 29. Square Dance Day 30. Stay Home Because You’re Well Day

THE HISTORY BEHIND THANKSGIVINGTRADITIONS T urkey , F ootball , and B lack F riday

5. Gunpowder Day 6. Saxophone Day 7. Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day 8. Dunce Day 9. Chaos Never Dies Day 10. Forget-Me-Not Day 11. Veterans Day 12. Chicken Soup for the Soul Day 13. World Kindness Day 14. World Diabetes Day 15. National Philanthropy Day

“There is one day that is ours. Thanksgiving Day is the one day that is purely American.” –O. Henry

In our lifetimes, Thanksgiving hasn’t changed all that much. Sure, you may have modernized the menu and begun posting your family photos to Instagram, but the tried-and-true quartet of family, football, grub, and gratitude has been in place for generations. While it’s easy to take holiday traditions as a given, each one has a fascinating history all its own. Christmas trees, Valentine’s chocolate, and other de rigueur activities often have strange, unexpected origins. With that in mind, let’s take a look at the backstories behind some of the essential Thanksgiving traditions. TURKEY Unlike other items on this list, it’s likely that turkey has been a staple of Thanksgivings since the first Thanksgiving in 1621. At the time, the holiday didn’t even have a name, and it was still more than 200 years away from being officially recognized by Abraham Lincoln. There are only two primary source documents detailing the meal between the Massachusetts colonists and the Wampanoag natives, and one of them mentions the famous Thanksgiving bird explicitly. Plymouth County Governor William Bradford described the menu in his journal “Of Plymouth Plantation,”which is one of the earliest accounts of life in colonial America. “Besides waterfowl,” he wrote, “there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc.” As the colonists moved throughout the continent, they brought turkeys with them. In fact, there was even a specific role, called a “turkey drover,” for the person who would shepherd the birds from one part of the country to another.

-John Razumich and Joe Delamater

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