OrthosportsPT_Aches & Pains? Posture Might Be the Cause

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ACHES & PAINS GETTING YOU DOWN? YOUR POSTURE MIGHT BE THE CAUSE!

Do you suffer from daily or recurrent aches and pains? If so, your posture may be the culprit. Just think about the number of hours a day we spend staring at a computer screen, hunched over our desks, or staring at our phones. That creates a lot of stress on the neck and back, especially if you are slouched, titled forward, or looking down for prolonged periods of time. How Bad Does Posture Affect You? Changes to your posture can negatively affect your body, and you may find yourself experiencing some of the following symptoms: If your posture contains a forward head tilt: This forward-head posture creates a strain on the neck, which can result in neck pain, shoulder pain, arm

pain, chronic headaches, and lower back pain. Tilting your head forward for long periods of time shortens the muscles in the back of the neck, and can result in soreness throughout multiple parts of your body. If yourposturecontainsslouchingof themid-back: If you slouch themiddle of your back, you can drive your head forward and alter the way your ribs naturally align. By doing this, you may experience pain in the slouched region of the mid-back, in addition to pain in the neck. If this is your average standing posture, it is important to seek physical therapy treatment right away – over time, standing like this day after day may cause internal issues, as it creates pressure on your lungs, heart, and digestive system.

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ACHES & PAINS GETTING YOU DOWN? (Continued) If your posture includes sitting for long periods of time: When you sit for prolonged periods of time, the muscles in your hips and legs will stiffen. When thesemuscles become stiff, they tighten andwill pull on the lower back, causing pain. The joints also lose their range of motion, which can cause soreness or achiness in the hips, legs, and back, and can create issues with your gait. The way in which you walk can also have an effect on your posture. When you have improper posture, your center of gravity changes. This can cause your balance to decline, which can cause pain when walking, thus creating a vicious cycle of overcompensation and pain. The most common symptom of poor posture is lower back pain, although pain can be present in other parts of the body, as well. The back muscles constantly contract to keep you upright, and they overcompensate when you slouch or hunch over. Over a period of time, constant poor posture can create an unusual amount of wear and tear on the lower back, which can increase the risk of arthritis in the spine. What Can You Do About It? It can be difficult to correct poor posture, but there are a few steps you can take on your own to try and help: 1. Sit properly. If you are at a desk for extended periods of the day, make sure your stance is okay. Sit upright, place your feet flat on the floor, and try not to cross your legs. Make sure there is a small gap between the back of your knees and the chair. Having a chair with strong back support and padding is also recommended for making your upright position more comfortable. 2. Take stretch breaks. If you are an office worker, it is not secret that most of the day is spent with limited levels of mobility. It is important to make sure that you get up every 30 minutes or so, and take a small walk, at least for a minute ACHES & PAINS GETTING YOU DOWN? (Continued) If your posture includes sitting for long periods of time: When you sit for prolonged periods of time, the muscles in your hips and legs will stiffen. When thesemuscles become stiff, they tighten andwill pull on the lower back, causing pain. The joints also lose their range of motion, whic can cause soreness or achiness in the hips, legs, and back, and ca create issues with your gait. The way in which you walk can also have an effect on your posture. When you have improper posture, your center of gravity changes. This can cause your b lance to d cline, which can cause pain when walking, thus creating a vicious cycle of ver ompensation and pain. The most common symptom of poor posture is lower back pain, although pain can be present in other parts of the body, as well. The back muscles constantly contract to keep you upright, and they overcompensate when you slouch or hunch over. Over a period of time, constant poor posture can create an unusual amount of wear and tear on the lower back, which can increase the risk of arthritis in the spine. What Can You Do About It? It can be difficult to correct poor posture, but there are a few steps you can take on your own to try and help: 1. Sit properly. If you are at a desk for extended periods of the day, make sure your stance is okay. Sit upright, place your feet flat on the floor, and try not to cross your legs. Make sure there is a small gap between the back of your knees and the chair. Having a chair with strong back support and padding is also reco ended for making your upright position more comfortable. . T ke stretch breaks. If you are an office worker, it is not s cret hat m st of t day is spent with limited l vels of mobility. It s important to make sure hat get up every 30 minutes or so, and take a small walk, at least for a minute

Call 716.839.3705 (Amherst) or 716.634.1578 (Clarence) to schedule today! Call 716.839.3705 (Amherst) or 71 .634.1578 (Clarence) to schedule today!

or two. This will help in loosening up your muscles and joints, as well as initiating a stronger blood flow. 3. Exercise. Exercise is incredibly important, especially if your job produces several hours of inactivity. When you exercise, you are stretching and strengthening certain muscles of your body, including problemareas such as your neck and back. Taking even a small amount of time to walk or jog around the neighborhood every day can highly improve your overall gait. 4. Set up your office properly. If you work from an office all day, it is important to have a proper ergonomic setup. Make sure that you are at a proper height with your desk chair and computer, so you don’t have to slouch or lean forward. Additionally, make sure your chair has the proper lumbar support needed to help you sit straight while you’re working. These simple steps can help tremendously with your overall posture. HowPhysical Therapy Can Help If these at-home treatments don’t work, it is important to consult help from a physical therapist. Simply standing up straight is a fight against gravity, and if you have been standing the wrong way for several years, it may be difficult to change it on your own. However, physical therapists are dedicated to getting you on back on track to a pain free, and risk free life. They will evaluate your posture and gait to determine the best treatments necessary for you, and then they will create a treatment plan unique for your needs. They can improve your posture, eliminate your pain, and get you back to doing the activities you love to do. If you are experiencing pain, and you think it may be a result of your posture, give us a call today at our Amherst (716-839-3705) or Clarence (716-634-1578) locations. We will help you get back to a comfortable posture with just a few sessions.

Relieve Pain In Minutes Try this exercise to loosen your lower back.

PRONE ON ELBOWS Lie on your stomach, hands beside your shoulders. Push with your arms up on to your elbows. Hold for 10 counts then return to start position. Repeat 8 times.

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The Benefits of Staying Active Even in the Cooler Months! The Benefits of Staying Active Even in the Co ler Months! The Benefits of Staying Activ Even in the C oler Months! h B s of ta in Active ven in the Co ler Months!

venture out in the cold. However, simply stepping outside can have positive effects. Sunlight can act as a natural mood booster, which may even increase motivation to exercise. • Absence of heat/humidity. Too much heat or humidity can sometimes feel suffocating. During colder months, this isn’t an issue. In fact, exercising in the cold can feel invigorating, as the crisp air can increase your energy. You run out of breath easier when it is hot and humid, so when that is taken away, you may be able to work out for longer periods of time. • Immune system boost. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, even just a few minutes of outdoor exposure during the winter can help prevent against both bacterial and viral infections. While cold weather exercise is important, icy walkways unfortunately pose a higher risk of falling and injury. Call us today if you need help staying balanced. We want to help you enjoy the activities you love! venture out in the cold. Howev r, simply stepping outside can have positive effects. Sunlight can act as a natural mood booster, which may ev n increase motivation to ex rcise. • Absence of heat/humidity. Too much heat or humidity can sometimes feel suffocating. During colder months, this isn’t an issue. In fact, exercising in the cold can feel invigorating, as the crisp air can increase your energy. You run out of breath easier when it is hot and humid, so when that is taken away, ou may be able to work out for longer periods of time. • Im une system boost. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prev ntion, even just a few minutes of outdoor exposure during the winter can help rev nt ag inst both bacterial and viral infections. While cold weather ex rcise is mportant, icy walkways unfortunately pose a higher risk of falling and injury. Call us today if you need help staying balanced. We want to help you enjoy the activities you love! venture out in the cold. However, simply ste ping outside can have positive effects. Sunlight c n act s n tural mood b oster, which may even incr ase mo vati n to exercise. • Absence of heat/humidity. T o much heat or hum dity can sometimes f el suffocating. During colder months, this isn’t an issue. In fact, exerc si g in the cold can feel invigorating, as the crisp air can increase your energy. You run ut of breath asier when t is hot and humid, so when tha is taken awa , you may e able t w rk out for long periods of time. • Immune system boost. According to the Centers for Disease C ntrol and Preve tion, even just a few minutes of outd or exposure during the winter can help prevent against both bacterial and v ral infections. While cold weather exerc se is important, icy walkways unfortunately pose a higher risk o falling a d injury. Call us today if you n d help staying b lanced. We want to help you enjoy the act vities y u love! ventur out in the cold. However, simply step ing outside can have posit ve f ects. Sunlight can act s a natural mood b oster, which may even increase motivation to exercise. • Absenc of heat/ umidity. To much heat or humidity can someti s f l suffocating. During colder months, t is isn’t an is ue. In fact, exercising in the cold an fe l invigorating, as the crisp a r can increase your energy. You run o t of breath asier when it is hot and humid, so when tha is aken away, you may be abl to w rk ut f r longer periods of time. • Immune system bo st. Ac ording to the Cent rs for Disease Control and Prevention, even just a few minutes of outd or exposure during the winter can help prevent against both bacterial and viral infections. While co d weather ex cise importan , icy walk ys unfortuna ely pose a hig er risk of falling a d injury. Call us today if you ne d help staying balanced. We want to help you enjoy the activi es you l ve!

Daily exercise is an important part of staying healthy and promoting wellness. It seems easier to get up and exercise when it is warm out, but there is actually evidence to support the benefits of working out in the cold. Depending on the type of workout, exercising in colder weather can actually have amore positive effect on the body than exercising in the heat. According to a study titled “Exercise in the cold,” found in the Journal of Sports Sciences, temperatures hovering around 50° Fahrenheit are optimal for high or moderate intensity workouts. Conversely, low intensity workouts are better performed indoors during colder months, as sufficient metabolic heat may not be generated well enough to offset the cooler environment. Exercise also helps loosen muscles that may become stiff in the winter months. Additional benefits to exercising include: • Sunlight intake. Vitamin D is important! Many people lack Vitamin D in the winter, due to a scarcity of desire to Daily ex rcise is an important part of staying healthy and promoting wellness. It seems easier to get up and ex rcise when it s warm out, but there is actually evidence to support the benefits of working out in the cold. Depending on the type of workout, ex rcising in colder weather can actually have amore positive effect on the body than ex rcising in the heat. According to a study titled “Exercise in the cold,” found in the Journal of Sports Sciences, temperatures hovering around 50° Fahrenheit are optimal for high or moderate intensity workouts. Conversely, low intensity workouts are better performed indoors during colder months, as sufficient metabolic heat may not be generated well enough to ffset he cooler environment. Exercise also helps loosen muscles that may become stiff in the winter months. Additional benefits to ex rcis ng include: • Sunlight intake. Vitamin D is important! Many people lack Vitamin D in the winter, due to a scarcity of desire to Daily exerci e is an important part of staying healthy and promoting wellne s. It s ems asier to get up and exercise when it is warm out, bu there is actually vid nce to support the benefits of working out in the cold. Depending on he type of workout, exerc s g in colder weather can actually h ve amore positive effect on the body than exerc s g in the heat. According to a study itled “Exercise in the cold,” fou d in the Journal of Sports Sci nces, tempe atures hovering around 50° Fahr nheit are optimal for high or mod rate intensity workouts. Conversely, low intensity workouts are better performe indoors during colder months, as sufficient metabolic heat may not be gen rated well enough to offset the c oler environment. Exercise also helps l osen mu cles that may become stiff in the winter months. Add tional benefits to exercis g include: • Sunlight intake. Vitamin D is important! Many eop e lack Vitamin D in the winter, due to a scarcity of d sire to Daily exercise is an importan part of staying healt y and prom ting wellnes . It se ms a ier to get up and exercise when it is warm out, but here is actually evidence to sup ort the benefits of working out in he cold. Dependi g o the type of w rk ut, exercising in colder weather can actually have amore posit ve ef ect on he body than exercising in the heat. Ac ording to a study ti led “Exercise in the cold,” found in the Journal of Sports Sciences, t mp ratures hovering around 50° Fahrenheit are optimal for hig or moderate inte si y work uts. Convers ly, low inte si y work uts are better perfo med indo rs during colder months, as ufficient metabolic heat may not be generated w ll nough to offset the co ler enviro ment. Exercise al o helps lo sen muscles tha m y become stif in the winter months. Ad it onal benefits to exercising i clude: • Sunlight in ake. Vitamin D s importan ! Many people lack Vitamin D in the winter, due to a scar ity of desire to

“ I would absolutely recommend OrthoSports to anyone!” PATIENT SUCCESS SPOTLIGHT “ I would absolutely recom end OrthoSports to anyone!” PATIENT SUC ES SPOTLIGHT “ I would absolutely reco mend OrthoSports to anyone!” PATIENT SU CE SPOTLIGHT I would absolutely recom end rt oSport o anyone!” ATIENT SUC ES POTLIGHT

“I want to compliment the entire Amherst and Clarence team for helping me with my lower back pain. I worked with Kelly the most. She was professional and knowledgeable about every question I had. I would absolutely recommend OrthoSports to anyone and would like to thank them for a job well done.” - C. J. “I want o compliment he ntire Amherst and Clarence team for helping me with my lower back pain. I worked with Kelly the most. She was professional and knowledgeable about every question I had. I would absolutely recommend OrthoSports to anyone and would like to thank them for a job well done.” - C. J. “I wan to complimen the entire Amherst and Clar nce team for helping me with my lower back pain. I worked with Kelly the most. She was professional and knowledgeable about every question I had. I would absolutely reco mend OrthoSports to a yone and would like o thank them for a job well done.” - C. J. “I want to compliment the entire Amherst and Clarence t am for helping me with my lower back pain. I worked with Kel y the most. She was profes ional and knowledgeabl about every question I had. I would absolute y recom end OrthoSports o anyone and would ike to hank them for a job wel done.” - C. J.

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These questions can help you start that conversation. Pain Questions • Why do I have pain? • How long will it take for me to heal from this injury or surgery? Managing Pain: Questions To Ask Your Health Care Provider Asking questions about your treatment plan is a great way to ensure that your health care provider understands your goals and that you can partner in your care. These questions can help you start that conversation. Pain Questi ns • Why do I have pain? How long will it take for me to heal from this injury or surgery? Managing Pain: Questio s To Ask Your Health Care Provider Asking questions about your treatment plan is a great way to ensure that your health care provider understands your goals and that you can partner in your care. These questions can help you start that conversation. Pain Questions • Why do I have pain? How l ng will it take for me to heal from this injury or surgery? Managing Pain: Questions To Ask Your Health Care Provider Asking questions about your treatment plan is a great way to ensure that your health care provider understands your goals and that you can partner in your care. These questions can help you start that conversation. Pain Questions • Why do I have pain? • How long will it t ke for me to heal from this injury or surgery? Self-Management Questions (What can I do?) • What activities should I avoid? • How can I speed up the healing process? • How can I go back to what I was doing before I had pain? • Is there anything else I can to do to feel better? Managing Pain: Questions To Ask Your Health C re Provider Asking questions about your t eatment plan is a great way to ensure that your health car o understands your goals and that you can partner in your care. These questions ca l that conversation. Pain Questions • Why do I have pain? • How long will it take for me to heal from this injury or surgery? Managing Pain: Questions To Ask Your Health Care Provider Managing Pain: Questions To Ask He lth Care Provid Asking questions about your treatment plan is a great way to ensure that your health care provider understands your goals and that you can artner in your c re. These questi ns can elp you start that conversation. Pain Questions • Why do I have pain? • How long will it take for me to heal from this injury or surgery? Self-Management Questions (What can I do?) • What activities should I avoid? • How can I speed up the healing process? • How can I go back to what I was doing before I had pain? • Is there anything else I can to do to feel better? Managing Pain: Questions To Ask Your Health Care Provider Asking questions about your treatment plan is a great way to ensure that your health care provider understands your goals and that you can partner in your care. These questions can help you start that conversation. Pain Questions • Why do I have pain? How long will it take for me to heal from this injury or surgery? Self-Management Questions (What can I do?) • What activities should I avoid? How can I speed up the healing process? go back to what I was d ing before I had pain? Is there anything else I c n to do t feel better? Medication Questions (If Applicable) • Why are you giving me this medication? What will it do for me? How long do I need to take it? at will happen to me if I take this medication? What is the risk f addicti n? What is the effect of not taking this medicati n? Managing Pain: Questio s To Ask Your Health Care rovider Asking questions about your treatment plan is a great way to ensure that your health care provider understands your goals and that you can partner in your care. These questions can help you start that conversation. Pain Questions • Why do I have pain? How long will it take for me to heal from this injury or surg ry? Self-Management Questions (What can I do?) • What activities should I avoid? • How can I speed up the healing process? go back to what I was d ing before I had pain? Is there anything els I c n to do t f el better? Medication Questions (If Applicable) • Why are y u giving me th s medication? What will it do for me? How long do I need to take it? • What will happen to me if I take this medication? What is the risk of addicti n? hat is the effect f not taking this medication? • Is this medication an opioid? Are ther other medications I could take instead? Are there ther options, such as physical t erapist reatment, that I can try instead of (or in addition to) medication? M naging Pain: Questions To Ask Your He lth Care rovider king questions about your treatment plan is a great way to ensure that your health care provider derstands your goals and that you can partner in your care. These questions can help you start t conversation. ain Questions Why do I have pain? How long will it t ke for me to heal from this injury or surgery? lf-Management Questions (What can I do?) What activities should I avoid? How can I speed up the healing process? How can I go back to what I was doing before I had pain? Is there anything else I can to do to feel b tter? edication Questions (If Applicable) Why are you giving me this medication? What will it do for me? How long do I need to take it? What will happen to me if I take this medication? What is the risk of addiction? What is the effect of not taking this medication? Is this medication an opioid? Are there other medications I could take instead? Are there other options, such as physical therapist treatment, that I can try instead of (or in addition to) medicatio ? anaging Pain: uestions To Ask Your ealth C re Provider Pain Questions • Why do I have pain? • How long will it take for me to heal from this injury or surgery? Self-Management Questions (What can I do?) • What activities should I avoid? • How can I speed up the healing process? • How can I go back to what I was doing before I had pain? • Is there anything else I can to do to feel better? Self-Management Questions (What can I do?) • What ctivities should I avoid? • How can I speed up the healing process? go back to what I was d ing before I had pain? Is there anything else I c n to do t feel better? Self-Management Questions (What can I do?) • What activities should I avoid? How c n I spe d up the healing process? How c n I go back to what I was doing before I had pain? Is there anything else I c n to do t f el better? Medication Questions (If Applicable) • Why are you giving me this medication? What will it do for me? How long do I need to take it? • What will happen to me if I take this medication? What is the risk of addiction? What is the effect of not taking this medication? • Is this medication an opioid? Are there other medications I could take instead? • Are there other options, such as physical therapist treatment, that I can try instead of (or in addition to) medication? Self-Management Questions (What can I do?) • What activities should I avoid? • How can I speed up the healing process? • How can I go back t what I was doing before I had pain? • Is there anything else I can to do to feel better? Medication Questions (If A plicable) • Why are you giving me this medication? What will it do for me? How long do I need to take it? • What will happen to me if I take this medication? Wh t is the risk of addiction? What is the effect of not taking this medication? Asking questions about your treatment p understands your goals and that you can that c nversati n. Medication Questions (If Applicable) • Why are you giving me this medication? What will it do for me? How long do I need to take it? • What will happen to me if I t e this medication? What is the risk of addiction? at is the effect of not taking this medication? Is this medication an op oid? Are there other medications I could take instead • Are there other options, such as physical therapist treatment, that I can try instead of (or in addition to) medication? • Is this medication an opioid? Are there other medications I could take instead? • Are there other options, such as physical therapist treatment, that I can try instead of (or in additi n to) medication? Self-Management Questions (What can I do?) • What activities should I avoid? • How can I speed up the healing process? • How can I go back to what I was doing before I had pain? • Is there anything else I can to do to feel better? Asking questions about your treatment p understands your goals and that you can that conversation. Medication Questions (If Applicable) • Why are you giving me this medication? What will it do for me? How long do I need to take it? • What will happen to me if I take this medication? What is the risk of addiction? What is the effect of not taking this medication? Medication Questions (If Applicable) • Why are you giving me this medication? What will it do for me? How long do I need to take it? W at will happen to me if I take this medication? What is the risk of addiction? What is the effect of not taking this medication? • Is this medication an opioid? Are there other medications I could take instead? Are there other ptions, such as physical therapist treatment, that I can try instead of (or in additi n to) medication? Medication Questions (If Applicable) • Why are you giving me th s medication? What will it do for me? How long do I need to take it? at will happen to me if I take this medication? What is the risk of addiction? What is the effect of not taking this medication? • Is this medication an opioid? Are ther other medications I could take instead? Are there other optio s, such as physical therapist treatment, that I can try instead of (or in addition to) medication? • Is this medication n opioid? Are there other medications I could take instead? • Are there other options, such as physical therapist treatment, that I can try instead of (or in addition to) medication? Pain Questions find more information and a physical therapist our area, visit ChoosePT.com . For more inf rmation, call your physical therapi at 716.839.3705 (Amherst) or 716.634.1578 (Clarence) today! Medication Questions (If Applicable) • Why are you giving me this medication? What will it do for me? How long do I need to take it? • What will happen to me if I take this medication? What is the risk of addiction? What is the effect of not taking this medication? • Is this medication an opioid? Are there other medications I could take instead? • Are there other options, such as physical therapist treatment, that I can try • Is this medication an op oid? Are there other medications I could take instead • Are there other options, such as physical therapist treatment, that I can try instead of (or in addition to) medication? For more inf rmation, call your physical ther is at Managing Pain: Questions To Ask Your Health Care Provider To find more information and a physical therapist

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