Mattson Financial Services - March 2018

Conflict resolution is never easy work. One wrong move can trigger the fault lines in an already complicated relationship. On the other hand, nothing good comes of allowing an unresolved problem to fester. Finding common ground is a must, even when it’s difficult or painful. We’ve provided resolution practices for both internal and external affairs so that you can be ready to handle any conflicts that come your way. 3 SKILLS YOU NEED TO RESOLVE YOUR NEXT CONFLICT “Good Leaders Ask Great Questions,” a book written by leadership guru John Maxwell, lays out the foundational concepts behind any effective conflict resolution session. Ask questions. If communication is a two-way street, then conflict resolution is a highway. Asking a great question starts the flow of communication. “Why?” is often the easiest and best question to start with. “FiveWhys”by Sakichi Toyoda is a method that you can use to untangle any issue. According to this principle, you can get to the heart of the matter within five times of asking why. Understanding and articulating the core of your issue will help you create a win-win scenario. SEEK FIRST TO UNDERSTAND

Remember that even if your retirement has been top of mind for you, it may not be on their radar. Erin Lowry, author of “Broke Millennial,” reminds us, “Adult children can’t be expected to know how ongoing support is affecting your finances if you haven’t talked to them about it.” If you can help them understand how the change will impact them and maybe even help them plan for it, you can open up that conversation and reduce tension around it. Instead of looking at the end of financial support as a loss, frame it as an opportunity. It’s an opportunity for your child to find financial independence, and while the journey can be rough, it will benefit everyone in the long term.

CREATE AWIN-WIN

In a win-win scenario, your conflict is resolved in a way that satisfies all involved parties. Ensure a win-win by taking these steps.

This simple and delicious one-pot recipe is perfect for a weeknight. It only requires about 15 minutes of hands-on work, but will taste like you spent all day building flavors. It’s a hearty comfort food that’s sure to delight eaters of all ages. LAUREL’S BRAISED CHICKEN AND SPRING VEGETABLES

Acknowledge the issue

Find common ground

Understand all sides

Attack the issue, not the person

Develop a mutual plan of action

Ingredients

COMPROMISE IS KEY

• 1 tablespoon olive oil • 8 small bone-in chicken thighs • 1 cup low-sodium chicken broth • 12 radishes, halved

• 4 large carrots, cut into sticks • 1 tablespoon sugar • 2 tablespoons fresh chives, chopped • Salt and pepper

Most conflicts come from emotional wounds, and those wounds need to be healed. The only way to truly find a solution for both parties is to find mutual compromise. If you are coming from a place of understanding and working toward a win-win, then compromise is a natural stepping stone to conflict resolution. If you aren’t, compromise may just be a way to put a patch on the problem instead of actually solving it. Successful conflict resolution resides in these three ideals, and all of them require emotional intelligence. A certain degree of self- awareness and empathy is the foundation of finding solutions. When these traits are combined with understanding, an effort to find a win-win situation, and willingness to compromise, you’ll find your conflicts resolved in an effective, equitable manner that will maintain relationships for a lifetime.

Directions

1. Heat olive oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. 2. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Brown in pan for 6–7 minutes per side. 3. Remove chicken from pan and scrape off excess fat. Add broth and stir in radishes, carrots, and sugar. 4. Return chicken to pan, placing on top of vegetables. Gently simmer with lid on pan for 15–20 minutes. Finish with chives.

[Recipe inspired by Real Simple]

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