CellCheck Newsletter Decemeber FINAL v1

DECEMBER EDITION 2017

CellCheck ANIMAL HEALTH IRELAND NEWSLETTER Contributing to a profitable and sustainable farming and agri-food sector through improved animal health

CELLCHECK PROGRAMME NEWS

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www.AnimalHealthIreland.ie

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR P11

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH P13

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PROGRAMME UPDATE

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27

AHI gratefully acknowledges the financial and other contributions of our stakeholders.

NATIONAL MASTITIS CONTROL PROGRAMME

CellCheck AnimalHealthIreland.ie Animal Health Ireland, 4-5 The Archways, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 WN27

CELLCHECK PROGRAMME

December News

Finola McCoy, Programme Manager

W elcome to the December CellCheck Newsletter - in the last edition of 2017, we reflect on some of the improvements in national udder health, evident from analysis of the most recent national bulk tank dataset figures. Data analysis also highlights some of the ongoing and emerging challenges that the industry faces, as it continues to work towards the goal for 2020, that 75% of milk supplied will have an SCC of 200,000 cells/mL or less. We have a follow-up article this month from Hazel Sheridan of DAFM, exploring the prudent use of antibiotics, and our monthly tip reminds us of the importance of a dry period……for both cow and milker! In this edition, we also report on the annual CellCheck Milking for Quality awards, and the very successful national event that was held last month, which celebrates the excellence and wonderful achievement of all the winners. Finally, the AHI team would like to wish all of our readers a very happy and peaceful festive season, and best wishes for the New Year.

Back left – David Graham, CEO Animal Health Ireland, Mike Magan, Chairman Animal Health Ireland, Kevin Moran, FBD Young Farmer of the Year (Speaker) and Joe Burns, Joe’s Farm Crisps (Speaker). Front left – Jane and Louis Grubb, Cashel Blue Farmhouse Cheeses (Speakers), Sandra Burns, Joe’s Farm Crisps (Speaker) and Finola McCoy, CellCheck Programme Manager attending the CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

Presentation of special award to the supplier from each of the 14 Milk Processors with the best SCC for 2016 CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards

Fiona Muldoon, CEO FBD Insurance, Jerry Ryan Arrabawn Coop, Martin & Margeret Coffey, David Graham, CEO Animal Health Ireland.

Liam Herlihy, Chairman FBD Insurance, Finola McCoy, CellCheck Programme Manager, Anthony Walsh, Aurivo, collecting the presentation on behalf of their winner, Declan Lynn, Mike Magan, Chairman Animal Health Ireland.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards

Fiona Muldoon, CEO FBD Insurances, Anne and Noel Jennings, David Graham, CEO Animal Health Ireland, Brian O’Flynn, Bandon Coop.

Liam Herlihy, Chairman FBD Insurance, Finola McCoy, CellCheck Programme Manager, Sinead and Kieran Whelton, Mike Magan, Chairman Animal Health Ireland.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards

Fiona Muldoon, CEO FBD Insurance, Susan and Liam O’Dwyer, Padraig Collins, Chairman Callan Coop, David Graham, CEO Animal Health Ireland.

Liam Herlihy, Chairman FBD Insurance, Tom and Mary Ryan, Finola McCoy, CellCheck Programme Manager, Joe Kerrigan, CEO Centenary Thurles, Mike Magan, Chairman Animal Health Ireland.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards

Fiona Muldoon, CEO, FBD Insurance, Eileen and David Hannon, James Lynch, Chairman Dairygold, David Graham, CEO Animal Health Ireland.

Liam Herlihy, Chairman FBD Insurance, Aidan Hickey, Seamus Daly, Dairy Manager Drinagh Coop, Finola Mc Coy, CellCheck Programme Manager Mike Magan, Chairman Animal Health Ireland.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards

Fiona Muldoon CEO FBD Insurance, Geraldine and Padraig O’Scanaill, Sean Molloy, Director of Strategy & Supplier Relations Glanbia, David Graham, CEO Animal Health Ireland.

Liam Herlihy, Chairman FBD Insurance,Breda and Denis O’Connell, John Murphy, Milk Quality Manager Kerry Agri- Business, Finola McCoy, CellCheck Programme Manager, Mike Magan, Chairman Animal Health Ireland.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards

Patricia McMahon, Fiona Muldoon CEO FBD Insurance, Eamon McMahon, Dean O’Neill, LacPatrick, David Graham, CEO Animal Health Ireland.

Mike Magan, Chairman Animal Health Ireland, Rosemarie and Vincent Traynor, Alo Duffy, Chairman Lakeland Dairies, Finola McCoy, CellCheck Programme Manager, Liam Herlihy, Chairman FBD Insurance.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

CellCheck Milking For Quality Awards

Fiona Muldoon CEO FBD Insurance, Michael and Marion White, Eleanor Hayes, Dairy Manager Lisavaird Coop, David Graham, CEO Animal Health Ireland.

Liam Herlihy, Chairman FBD Insurance, Finola McCoy, CellCheck Programme Manager, John Crowe, Andrew O’Neill, Milk Quality Advisor Tipperary Coop, Charlotte and John Crowe, Mike Magan, Chairman Animal Health Ireland.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

Guest Contributor

Prudent use of antibiotics - practical steps

Hazel Sheridan, Medicines Division, Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Backweston, Co. Kildare.

A ntimicrobial resistance, or AMR, has been described by the World Health Organization as “a crisis that must be managed with the utmost urgency”. The key driver of resistance is the use of antibiotics in both human and animal populations. The use of antibiotics in both human and animal populations has increased significantly in recent years. In humans, this is due to increasing population size, pressure on resources and increased longevity. In animals, this is occurring in response to factors such as intensification to meet increased demands for animal protein and downward pressure on food prices. In order to keep antibiotics working as effective disease treatment options for humans and animals it is essential that we use them in a way that will retain their effectiveness (prudent use). Our ability to trade our products of animal origin also requires us to be able to demonstrate that antibiotics are being used, only when absolutely necessary and in line with international guidelines on prudent use. In general, prudent use of antibiotics means using antibiotics in accordance with 5 key principles:

1. Right advice 2. Right animal 3. Right drug 4. Right dose 5. Right duration

Right advice means, antibiotics are only being prescribed by the veterinary practitioner who has real knowledge of the animal health situation on your farm. This knowledge may involve results of laboratory tests, somatic cell counts etc, conversations with advisors but it must also include an element of physical examination of the facilities, processes and animals on your farm. Facilities and processes can be drivers of disease outbreaks. As an example, incorrect use of disinfectants can actually damage teat skin and make bacterial mastitis more likely. In addition, some animals are more at risk of developing mastitis than others. Looking at all these elements in a joined-up way, will help identify interventions that can prevent outbreaks of disease in the first place and thus can remove the need to use antibiotics at all. For example, culling chronically affected animals, handling the teats with cleaned gloved hands, ensuring animals and teats are clean, properly maintaining milking machines and using teat sealants are ways in which mastitis can be prevented that will reduce the current dependence on mastitis tubes at dry off. Getting the right advice is crucial to a successful outcome.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Right animal means, antibiotics are only being used where an animal has a bacterial disease (in this case bacterial mastitis), since antibiotics are only effective against bacteria. Antibiotics are completely ineffective against viruses and fungi. It is a waste of money to use antibiotics in an animal unless you are treating a bacterial disease, nor should they be used in situations where an animal is not yet sick, as is often the case in blanket dry cow therapy. There are other ways to prevent mastitis developing in an animal or in a herd, and in the face of the ever increasing threat posed by AMR, these should be exhausted first, before resorting to the use of antibiotics to prevent disease or to stop disease spreading from one animal to another. Right drug means, that the antibiotic being prescribed by your veterinary practitioner is the one that will kill the particular type of bacteria causing this particular outbreak of mastitis. Bacteria have been on this planet a lot longer than us. This they have been able to do because they are very adaptable. If antibiotic resistance starts to develop within a herd, continuous use of these same tubes at dry off will accelerate the problem. In time, the resistant bacteria will outnumber the susceptible bacteria. The tube will become less and less effective until, eventually, it will not work at all. The way to monitor the development of bacterial resistance to tubes you are using, and thereby protect your investment, is to carry out regular antibiotic susceptibility testing on milk samples. Right dose and right duration means ensuring that you use your tubes precisely as laid out in the veterinary prescription. When a medicine is being approved for use in animals (or humans), it undergoes a safety, quality and efficacy assessment. The results of this safety, quality and efficacy assessment will be attached to the medicine’s approval in the formof themedicine’s summary of product characteristics (SPC). The SPC for each product approved for use in Ireland is available on the Health Products Regulatory Authority’s website click here . Medicines must be used in accordance with those conditions if they are to have the effect they are designed to have (in this case to kill bacteria that are causing mastitis) and this effect is to be maintained over time. The purpose of the prescription, and the labelling on the product, is to ensure that you are clear on the conditions that need to be complied with if the tubes are to be effective. In particular, it is vital to ensure that the correct dose is administered for the weight of the animal; under dosing is a key driver of antibiotic resistance, while over dosing is a waste of money. Similarly if you do not continue to treat the animal for the full course, as per your prescription, you are favouring the development of antibiotic resistance, because some of the offending bacteria will be left alive, even though the animal itself may appear to be cured.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

CELLCHECK TIP OF THE MONTH Everyone needs a break!

[Click here] for previously published tips

W ith the better milk price this year, some farmers may be tempted to continue milking cows as long as they keep producing milk. However, this could prove to be a costly exercise in the long run. It is important to remember that every cow needs a dry period before she calves again, and starts her next lactation. Every farmer and milker needs a dry period too! This is your chance to take a break from the routine, which is important for your own mental and physical health. For the cow, this is the time when mammary tissue regenerates, repairs and prepares to produce milk again. It is also the period when cows have an opportunity to reach the optimal body condition score, in preparation for calving and the start of the next breeding cycle. The general recommendation is that cows need a dry period that is at least 42 days long. To ignore, or significantly shorten the dry period, could have a detrimental effect on the productivity of the herd in 2018. Shorter dry periods can also increase the risk of antibiotic residues in milk after calving, if sufficient attention is not given to the minimum dry period duration of the product. Just because the product was fine to use last year on cows that had a 7 week dry period, doesn’t automatically mean that is ok to use this year in cows that might only be dry for 6 weeks! The dry period is also an ideal time to deal with those high SCC cows, or chronic cases of mastitis. While factors such as the bacteria involved can influence the outcome, generally treating infected cows with dry cow therapy (DCT) delivers a better cure rate than treatment during lactation.

Remember! Hygiene at drying off is absolutely crucial-what you do now will have an impact on udder health in 2018.

See the CellCheck Farm Guidelines for more information on this topic.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

Programme Update Annual progress in national udder health

O ne of the key objectives of the CellCheck programme has been to establish a national bulk tank somatic cell count (SCC) database. The primary purpose of this is to monitor progress and trends in the udder health of the national herd. In the absence of a national SCC database, the results from milk recording herds in Ireland were used as a proxy for national performance, which while detailed and informative, account for only one-third of Irish dairy herds. By comparison, the national SCC dataset captures information on more than 95% of the Irish milk pool. The establishment of this database has been facilitated by the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine (DAFM), in partnership with the dairy co-ops and processors. Preliminary analysis of this dataset shows a continued positive trend in the national udder health (Figure 1), with an increase in the proportion of both herds and milk volume with an annual SCC <200,000 cells/mL. (Figure 2)

Figure 1. Annual average SCC (2007-2016)

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

Programme Update

Analysis of national sales data for intra-mammary products also shows a positive trend, with a reduction in the ‘defined course dose’ (DCDvet) for in- lactation products, which indicates a reduction in the number of mastitis treatments administered during

lactation. This analysis looked at sales data from 2003 to 2015, with DCDvet per 100 animals per year reducing to 46.56 in 2015 from a high of 69.91 in 2008. (Fig 3). However, the same analysis also suggests that blanket dry cow antibiotic therapy is practised on almost 100% of Irish farms, which in light of the increasing awareness and focus on prudent antibiotic use no longer aligns with international best practice and thinking. Figure 2. Annual increase in the proportion of herds/milk volume with an SCC <200,000 cells/mL

REDUCED IN-LACTATION INTRAMMARY USE

70

60

50

40

30

Defined course dose per 100 animals per year

20

10

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

Figure 3. Estimated on-farm antimicrobial usage of in-lactation intramammary antimicrobials in Ireland between 2003 and 2015.

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

Programme Update

Further data analysis identifies additional ongoing challenges for the industry, such as the low uptake of milk recording in Irish dairy herds (Fig. 4). This is likely to be a potential obstacle to continued progress in udder health, as many herds with an annual SCC between 200 and 400,000 cells/mL will have limited ability to make further udder health improvements without the individual cow information required to take appropriate action and make effective management changes.

Figure 4. Annual number of dairy herds in Ireland participating in milk recording (2010-2016)

The national SCC database is also what enables us to run the very successful annual CellCheck Milking for Quality Awards programme. This year’s award ceremony, which is reported on elsewhere in the newsletter, is based on the 2016 SCC results. The award plaque, which is sponsored by FBD, is given to the 500 milk suppliers nationally with the lowest, weighted annual average SCC. Suppliers must have at least 9 months of SCC results to be considered eligible. We continue to see increasing levels of excellence even among the top suppliers in the country, with all 500 winners of the 2016 awards having an SCC of 78,000 cells/mL or less, compared to the winners of the 2013 awards who all had an SCC of 103,000 cells/mL or less- a phenomenal achievement!

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

CELLCHECK REGIONAL COORDINATORS

A Resource and Point of Contact for CellCheck Activities in your Area

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Tom Starr 087 6697010

Mícheal Guinan 086 3511852 micheal.guinan@aurivo.ie Mayo/Sligo Aurivo

tstarr@arrabawn.ie Tipperary/Limerick National Co-op

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John Fitzpatrick 086 0426567

Sean McCarthy 066 7163200 sean.mccarthy@kerry.ie Kerry/Clare Kerry Agribusiness

fitzpatrickj@glanbia.ie Kilkenny/Laois/Carlow/ Kildare/Dublin Glanbia

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Sinead Treanor streanor@carbery.com 023 8822369 West Cork Carbery Group

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Andrew O’Neill 086 1836505 aoneill@tipperary-coop.ie Tipperary Tipperary Co-Op

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Tom Downes 087 2564669

Denis Guiry 086 8098639 dguiry@dairygold.ie Cork/Tipperary/Limerick Dairygold

downest@lakeland.ie Longford/Monaghan Lakeland Dairies

Brendan Dillon 087 2626851 BrDillon@glanbia.ie

Cork/Waterford/ Wexford/Wicklow Glanbia

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CELLCHECK NEWSLETTER • DECEMBER EDITION 2017

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